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I'm surprised a direct connection is being made, as the cost is very high, considering the existing subway entrance sits right in front of the Opera House. But I guess if they are going to have to install a new elevator from the street anyway, as part of an overal access improvement for the subway...might as well kill two birds with one stone.

I hear the ROM is also getting a direct subway connection as well.





KGB
 

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rbt said:
It seems the new Opera House at Osgood station will be connected via staircase and elevator. I wasn't entirely sure whether it would be or not due to possible noise concerns.

See note in: http://www.city.toronto.on.ca/ttc/pdf/osgoode_station_elevator.pdf
Noise concerns?
Streetcars on Queen.
Subway on University.
Major hospitals not too far away.
Bell tower at old city hall.
Traffic like crazy.

Noise concerns? What possible difference could direct subway access have?

Our "Brampton Chic" opera house will be, to be certain, the best damn opera house for the buck, and I'm sure the accoustics will be very good, but I'd be stunned, abasltsly stunned, if you could not feel or hear the subways and streetcars.
I'm sure ti will be fine, but I'd recomend not seeing an oera during rush hour!
 

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Are Be said:
Noise concerns?
Streetcars on Queen.
Subway on University.
Major hospitals not too far away.
Bell tower at old city hall.
Traffic like crazy.

Noise concerns? What possible difference could direct subway access have?

Our "Brampton Chic" opera house will be, to be certain, the best damn opera house for the buck, and I'm sure the accoustics will be very good, but I'd be stunned, abasltsly stunned, if you could not feel or hear the subways and streetcars.
I'm sure ti will be fine, but I'd recomend not seeing an oera during rush hour!
Well the building itself sits on rubber "shoes" so no vibrations will be felt inside the hall. And noise, I would really believe they'd have prepared for that.:D
 
G

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Are Be said:
Noise concerns?
Streetcars on Queen.
Subway on University.
Major hospitals not too far away.
Bell tower at old city hall.
Traffic like crazy.

Noise concerns? What possible difference could direct subway access have?

Our "Brampton Chic" opera house will be, to be certain, the best damn opera house for the buck, and I'm sure the accoustics will be very good, but I'd be stunned, abasltsly stunned, if you could not feel or hear the subways and streetcars.
I'm sure ti will be fine, but I'd recomend not seeing an oera during rush hour!

The subway won't be an issue...no way they'd spend all that money to make it accoustically sound and then ruin it with subway noise.

If they did, it would be such a ridiculous error.
 

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A Toronto Star article:

Expect to be wowed


MARTIN KNELMAN

For the past two or three years, the insiders of Toronto's opera world have been getting sneak previews of the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts. We've seen the models, we've seen the drawings, we've heard the speeches, we've watched the computer animation.

But walking through the House That Jack Built with architect Jack Diamond in person, wearing a suit and tie as well as a hard hat and construction boots, is a whole different experience.

"Wow!" only begins to cover it.

Perhaps that is because after two decades of opera-house foreplay, during which Toronto acquired an international reputation as a city addicted to delay, I was thrilled to get concrete proof that, hey, this time they really are building the place.

It would be stretching the truth to say it is anywhere close to finished. But the spaces are formed, so taking a guided tour, combined with a few imaginative leaps, gives a tantalizing sense of what we'll find come the fall of 2006 when we can return — minus the hard hats and construction boots — for a night at the opera.

Looking out from the stage, on the lowest level, Diamond explains: "We've all talked a lot about how intimate this auditorium was going to be, but people who come to look the place over are nevertheless amazed at just how true that has turned out to be."

Indeed, with only 2,000 seats (compared with more than 3,000 at the Hummingbird) the new house has the feel of a gently flowing jewel box, floating up through five graceful levels with a traditional horseshoe shape.

None of the seats is cursed by those familiar problems. In this house, you will never be sitting more than 40 metres from the stage. You'll never be squished under a sound-deadening concrete canopy. And your view will never be blocked by a railing.

"If you look up there," Diamond suggests, pointing to the upper levels, "you'll see how the balconies swoop up slightly at the side as the seats turn the corner of the horseshoe. That means those seats won't be problematic the way they often are at other houses."

Every seat has been carefully tested for acoustics and sightlines, with both opera and ballet in mind.

"Our greatest achievement has been economy of means," Diamond boasts. "We did not have an extravagant budget, so we could not do a lot of whimsical things. There are no arch conceits. Yet we have not lost anything. That is because we had to spend the money on the right things."

Putting it another way, Diamond remarks: "It's easy to design a building that makes you gasp but doesn't work. It's harder to design one that works while still making you gasp."

He claims this one falls into the latter category.

Acoustically, the challenge was that no noise leaks into the auditorium, R. Fraser Elliott Hall, despite its proximity to busy city streets and the University subway line.

Next comes a short history of concert hall acoustics theory, succinctly explained by Diamond at his most professorial.

The point: There are two kinds of noise — airborne and structure-borne — requiring two different solutions. Thick walls can eliminate type-one noise, but type-two noise calls for a higher-tech approach. In this case, rubber pads throughout the structure, along with physical gaps, eliminate the possibility of noise transference.

So when you're in the middle of Il Trovatore or Die Walküre, you won't hear the rumble of the subway train or the rattle of a taxi. You also won't hear people at the hotel across the street having a great party.

"Noise was the number one problem," Diamond confides. "But one of the most significant discoveries we made is that the more you do to reduce noise, the better your chances are of hearing every nuance within the performance."

In other words, the show will sound better than it would had there been no noise problem to solve.

But apart from noise, how will the building relate to the familiar scene around Queen St. W. and University Ave.?

"This is not a building that is set at the end of a grand vista," says Diamond. "We have deliberately made it fit in with Toronto's genius of having continuous and animated streetscapes — while at the same time expressing the excitement of the horseshoe, contrasted with the drum of the theatre. Our approach is not a conceit; instead it is an inherently correct way of shaping the forms to meet certain requirements."

But despite the no-nonsense, get-the-job-done approach, Diamond indulged in one grand signature flourish — the spectacular City Room on the west side through which people will make their way to and from the auditorium.

It's a multi-level flight of fancy whose motto is, above all, transparency. It features a special kind of glass that creates the illusion it isn't there. Or to state the obvious: From outside you can see what's going on inside, and from inside you can see what's going on outside.

Traditional European opera houses took an elitist approach to the question of coming and going. There were often grand baroque entrance halls for the upper set, while the common folk had to trudge up Dickensian staircases at the side to reach the upper balcony.

Diamond, on the contrary, takes a democratic, Toronto approach. There's an entrance to the lobby directly from the subway, accessible even to TTC users who don't have opera tickets. There's no divide segregating patrons with expensive tickets from those with cheaper tickets.

"We've created a huge lantern to give the opera a distinctive sense of place while still conforming to the discipline of the street," says Diamond.

A special kind of low-iron glass gives those on the inside a sense of connection with the city they wouldn't get looking through ordinary glass.

Those inside will know exactly where they are, and they'll feel connected to the city. Before and after the performance, the City Room provides an opportunity for strutting and gawking that Federico Fellini would have appreciated.

And if ever there was a perfect movie set, it's the all-glass Cinderella staircase that flows up, up, up through the lobby to the amphitheatre. Near the top, it becomes not just a staircase but a mini-theatre suitable for lunch-time chamber concerts and cozy discussion groups.

At the moment, it's intermission time, and there is still a long way to go. But some enchanted evening before too long, I'll be back to catch the final act.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Noise concerns? What possible difference could direct subway access have?

You can regularly hear the subway screeching of trains stopping or going around the curve at St. Andrew within the Sun Life buildings during rush hours when the doors are open.

Perhaps it's strictly an insolated elevator connection so that the sound won't be able to reach the opera house airborn OR they'll have a double door system that doesn't allow both doors open at the same time during performances.

I'm sure it's been considered. I just didn't expect them to have a connection because that's by far the easiest way to deal with it.
 
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