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Shanghai's Bund had a short piece of elevated highway loop that was torn down not long ago as part of the Bund makeover.

But Seoul did an incredible job of turning an urban tar hell hole into a breathtaking place of incredible quality, an oasis in the middle of the city.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d0/Korea-Seoul-Cheonggyecheon-2008-01.jpg


What is most astonishingly is that the torn down highway was NOT replaced by anything similar or of even higher capacity (like in Shanghai with an underground tunnel). I have not heard of any similar as radical project anywhere else. But if someone knows one I'd love to hear about it as well.
 

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Oh No He Didn't
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The Big Dig project in Boston removed the elevated portion of I-93 in Downtown and replaced it with a tunneled section. The project was the most expensive highway project in US history and costs approximately $14.6 billion in total.


Here is a photo of the old elevated highway.






And here are a few photos of the new underground highway along with the park called the Rose Kennedy Greenway, that occupies the previous space where the elevated highway once stood.

Big Dig
Rose Kennedy Greenway
 

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***Alexxx***
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Birmingham, England has half of it elevated Inner Ring Road removed. There is now a much smaller surface level boulevard...

This is how it used to look in the 90s...


And now...
 

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I'd really like to see the Big Dig in Boston in person. We've been debating burying a major elevated highway for decades, but the more we build right up against it, the more obstacles we've created to accomplish that.
 

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Journeyman
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In the other thread Seattle's "little big dig" is discussed. We're replacing the viaduct on Downtown's central waterfront, a six-block tunnel, and three blocks of surface divided highway with a 9,000' deep bore bypass tunnel. After an election to stop this massively flopped a year ago, it's now well into preliminary work, with a giant pit being dug for the boring machine.

A deep tunnel isn't easy. But it does avoid much of the surface disruption involved with shallow tunnels. Of course it only works with the bypass concept...you can't have exits from 100+ feet down.

A surface boulevard will serve "local" traffic headed Downtown or to the northwest of Downtown.

Oh hell, this from the other thread is all relevant:

This is a map. http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/Projects/SR99/Tunnel/PojectMap.htm

Regarding the current viaduct along Elliott Bay, here is what's envisioned for that stretch. It's early...construction would be after the tunnel is done and the viaduct goes away, starting in 2016. Basically an expanded surface roadway and a fair amount of new public space. (The tunnel will only be close to a portion of this at the south end.) http://waterfrontseattle.org/downloads/Waterfront_Seattle_Design_Summary_July2012.pdf
 

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The Big Dig project in Boston removed the elevated portion of I-93 in Downtown and replaced it with a tunneled section. The project was the most expensive highway project in US history and costs approximately $14.6 billion in total.
Not a very good model for public works.

While it boosted the Massachusetts economy and no doubt the pockets of many contracters & politicians for a decade, the Big Dig didn't turn out to be a very practical or prudent project.

Lets try to do better next time!
 

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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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I'd really like to see the Big Dig in Boston in person. We've been debating burying a major elevated highway for decades, but the more we build right up against it, the more obstacles we've created to accomplish that.
The Central Artery project resulted in some newly developable parcels, the Rose Kennedy Greenway which is a nice series of park islands where the elevated highway once stood, and of course, rerouted traffic that churns below. Unfortunately, the parcels are too large and singular, bland, boxy residential developments with little character are being built on them. So while a good portion of space was reclaimed, it hasn't improved the urban fabric as much as everyone had hoped. Toronto can definitely do far better than this. :yes:

 

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Oh No He Didn't
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Not a very good model for public works.

While it boosted the Massachusetts economy and no doubt the pockets of many contracters & politicians for a decade, the Big Dig didn't turn out to be a very practical or prudent project.

Lets try to do better next time!
The Big Dig project also involved building the new Ted Williams Tunnel in addition to replacing/burying the Central Artery and despite the price tag, was well worth it since traffic from Logan Airport now has easier access to the rest of Boston instead of relying on the Sumner/Callahan Tunnels.

That being said though they should have done a better job of choosing the contractors, because of the shoddy workmanship.
 

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The problem I have with the big dig in Boston ist that it was in first line a highway expansion program and only as an afterthought a program to make downtown more pedestrian friendly and lively.

The ugly truth is unless you create monstrous highway infrastructure, you'll always end up with bottlenecks. And according to some reports the traffic situation is worse than ever (http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2008/11/16/big_dig_pushes_bottlenecks_outward/). That comes as no surprise as the downtown highway passage has massively increased capacity, overloading the more peripheral highways and possibly making also traffic within downtown worse as roads there are naturally limited. Induced demand here we come.

Moreover while the surface definitely improved vastly and crossability and pedestrian attractiveness greatly improved, in many parts the surface is still dominated by large multi-lane roads with heavy traffic.

Instead investing that fortune into expanded highway structures, it would have been interesting if all that money had gone into improved public transportation, bike infrastructure, pushing TOD developments, also outside of downtown... instead of spending only a part of the vast budget on doing that.
 

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***Alexxx***
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Are they planning to fill the area left after the elevated road with something? Looks rather empty as it is now.
There will be plans, I'm not sure on the exact details, I think the land is all being sold but I also know that one of the HS2 stations is meant to be near there so they maybe waiting until that is built.
 
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