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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Ethiopia's Teff grain set to be the world's next super food​


http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/wellness/teff-ethiopias-nutritious-grain/2014/04/08/0954563e-b9ab-11e3-9a05-c739f29ccb08_story.html
http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/poverty-matters/2014/jan/23/get-taste-for-teff-ethiopia-superfood
http://www.newser.com/story/181229/will-ancient-grain-teff-be-the-next-super-food.html

Under a searing midday sun, a herd of cattle circles atop a pile of golden teff, thrashing the wheat-like grain, a method that has been practiced by Ethiopian farmers for centuries.
The crop, mostly grown in the Horn of Africa, is a key part of the country's heritage and a crucial food staple, but is also gaining increased interest abroad among health afficionados seeking a nutritious, gluten-free alternative to wheat.
"Ethiopians are proud of the crop because it is almost our identity," said Solomon Chanyalew, director of the Debre Zeyt Agricultural Research Centre, a teff research hub.
"But these days, teff is getting global attention," he said.
Relatively unknown outside of Ethiopia - for now - the cereal is predicted to replace quinoa as the latest global "super-food."
But a ban on exports to control price hikes at home has left farmers tied to local consumers, limiting their contribution to growing markets abroad.
The poppy-seed sized grain is renowned for its nutritional qualities. Mineral-rich and high in protein, teff is also a slow-releasing food, ideal for diabetics, and sought after by people with a gluten intolerance or Celiac disease.
"Teff is not only gluten-free, which is an increasingly important aspect of foods that is being sought out, but it's also incredibly nutritious. Many people consider teff to be a super-food," said Khalid Bomba, CEO of Ethiopia's Agricultural Transformation Agency.
In Ethiopia, teff is used to make injera, a spongy fermented pancake topped with meat or vegetable stew and consumed with an almost religious devotion, often three times a day.
In the West however, where it is touted by celebrity chefs and health-conscious Hollywood stars, the grain is most commonly ground into flour and used to make biscuits, breads, pastas and even teff juice.
It is also a resilient crop; it can grow between sea level and 3,000 meters and is both drought- and flood-resistant, ideal for Ethiopia's dry highlands.
But despite its versatility, Ethiopia's 6.5 million teff farmers struggle to meet local demand - let alone growing demand from abroad - with limited access to seed varieties, fertilizers and modern machinery that would allow for higher yields.
Teff also suffers from a lack of research since it is considered an "orphan crop," unlike global crops like rice, wheat, and maize, which are widely studied and well-funded.
"People don't want to work on teff, basically, it's not paying," said Kebebew Assefa, one of only two full-time teff researchers in Ethiopia.
Regardless, productivity has climbed to bridge the supply gap, with the introduction of 19 new teff varieties and improved farming techniques.
In the last four years, yields have increased from 1.2 to 1.5 million tons per hectare, which Khalid said bodes well.
"The production increases are what gives us the confidence that Ethiopia will be able to compete at a global level when it comes to tapping into the increasing demand from consumers in Europe, in London, or New York or Brisbane," he said.
An estimated two million tons per hectare is required to reach export potential.
For now, the ban on exports remains in place to avoid the pitfalls of quinoa in Bolivia, where most people could not afford the staple crop after the surge in global popularity.
The price of teff - $72 per quintal - is already too expensive for the majority of Ethiopians who earn less than two dollars per day.
But farmers are eager to export their teff, well aware of the higher prices they can fetch.
"I want to sell it abroad because it's going to have a good market and I will earn good money and it will bring good motivation for my work," said Tirunesh Merete, 60, who has been growing teff for nearly four decades.
Neighbouring farmer Amha Abraham said he is keen to make more money, but recognizes that local markets need to be fed first.
"If we export teff to other countries then we can get a lot of money, but we must provide first for our country's consumption," he said, standing near a giant pile of golden teff stalks, used for roofing and as cattle feed.
Until the export ban is lifted, Ethiopian farmers remain excluded from a growing international industry, with teff products appearing on shelves in health food stores across North America and Europe.
"Everybody has started talking about gluten-free," said Rob Roffel, CEO of the Dutch company Consenza, which produces gluten-free foods from teff grown in the Netherlands.
"The demand for gluten-free foods mainly was for Celiacs... but what we see now more and more is other target groups interested in teff flour," he said, adding that his business has grown 30 percent annually since 2006.
In the meantime, Khalid said he has high hopes for teff.
"If you look at what's happened with quinoa, it's a $150 million market in five years and teff is actually much more nutritious and much more resilient than quinoa," he said.
"So we think there's a much bigger market opportunity for teff."
 

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Its great that its gaining popularity, hopefully the lowly farmer (in Ethiopia) get their rewards from it. Of course popularity may have a downside too..like more farmers in different parts of the world growing it now.
 

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Its great that its gaining popularity, hopefully the lowly farmer (in Ethiopia) get their rewards from it. Of course popularity may have a downside too..like more farmers in different parts of the world growing it now.
Like mentioned in the first video, Ethiopian farmers are not profiting from teff since large commercial exports are banned to keep the local prices in check.

I was about to create a thread regarding this, whats yall opinion on banning teff exports?

I understand the governments fear, but the consequence is that countries like Greek are now exporting teff to markets around Europe, our farmers are missing out.
This might be a the wrong strategy in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It looks like Teff is getting the world by surprise, though it is sad our farmers aren't benefiting from it. Banning it completely was a very hasty and stupid decision, the least they could do is limit Teff export to foreign investors until the national Teff production level rises to an optimum level.
 

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Didnt know it was banned. Maybe its to keep prices low in the internal market.

I think banned or not tho, once popularity gained and prices rise on the world market, there would be no way to stop other countries from jumping on board. It really is a double edged sword. U.S. farmers in Nebraska and Idaho have been also growing/selling it for a while now btw.

The best we can do is market our teff as the most genuine and native and hope that our quality tops the rest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

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You can't patent nature. That's silly.

I think banning its export because of increased demand is misguided. So is concern of worldwide competition. Ethiopia is also the birthplace of coffee. The fact that there is worldwide demand for coffee did nothing to hurt the local economy; to the contrary, it became the country's most prized export commodity.

I think what businesses should be doing is adding value to teff and exporting these products. It's better than exporting the raw grain anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Coffee is a luxury commodity, if the price soars people can live another day with out one, Teff is the primary option of food for most of the country . If the price soars as it will, it would be catastrophic. But like is said it could be reserved for foreign investors up until production level makes it possible to deal with price hikes
 

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I really dislike the fact that non Habesha farmers are profiting from selling Teff. I especially despise the Dutch for what they did. The Dutch have always profited from backstabbing naive people, see East India company VOC where they plundered Asia from it's resources and the whole reason The Netherlands is a first world country and so wealthy without any resources because of taking advantage of people. They also became rich of slavetrade which they are trying to hide from the historybooks.

I have to deal with these people on the daily, they are never nice without them wanting to use you. Whom they'll kick to the curb when they don't need you.

We need to start exporting ASAP and maybe incentivise the crop. I refuse to buy western grown Teff, which won't help the Ethiopian community. I am still waiting for Ethiopia to export it as they Do Coffee so everyone knows Ethiopian Teff is the best and the original grain.

They are selling Dutch GMO Teff at all the supermarkets and Ethiopia is seeing none of the money it deserves.
 

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Teff ( ጤፍ ) – the next big "superfood"?

Chia seeds, quinoa and coconut everything. These products have taken over the shelves of modern supermarkets all over the world in the quest for a healthy diet. Now there's a new contender to add to the gluten-free mix: the Ethiopian grain teff.

Teff is the smallest known grain in the world, tinier even than a poppy seed. It's used most commonly in the flatbread injera, which is eaten across East Africa. But teff can also be added to cakes, noodles, cookies and muffins, eaten as porridge or used as a polenta replacement.

Hailed by some as the next big "superfood", just how super is this ancient little seed?






ህንዶች በበርካታ የንግድ ዘርፍ ዉስጥ እየተሳተፉ ነዉ።

 

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Row Planting of Teff - ጤፍን በመስመር መዝራት

Teff is an important cereal crop in Ethiopia. Traditional planting approaches require high inputs and result in low yields, including postharvest loss due to the high levels of seeds used in planting. This video describes a row planting technique that reduces input costs and increases yield. One-tenth the level of teff seeds are used in row planting, as compared to the traditional planting approach, resulting in significantly more efficient use of teff grains in agricultural production.




Source = SAWBO Scientific Animations Without Borders​
 

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Teff is an important cereal crop in Ethiopia. Traditional planting approaches require high inputs and result in low yields, including postharvest loss due to the high levels of seeds used in planting. This video describes a row planting technique that reduces input costs and increases yield. One-tenth the level of teff seeds are used in row planting, as compared to the traditional planting approach, resulting in significantly more efficient use of teff grains in agricultural production.




Source = SAWBO Scientific Animations Without Borders​



Don't we have the capacity to do the animation domestically than by some foreigners? When are we going to learn from our mistakes and be self relied?? It is so stupid such foreign dependency approach. There are emerging animators who are doing better than this production. :bash::eek:hno:​
 
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