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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)

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If this thing gets built it will be iconic. But I fear it will be way too costly (read $$$ Billions $$$). One can only hope.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
16 Aug 2010

Tehransar Project, Tehran, Iran
Design : Daneshgar Architects

A Large Scale Urban Development Project

We have a clear vision of what we are dreaming. We dream of making a platform for social interactions. We dream of maximizing the quality of living within every moments of daily life. We dream of a city with high standards of living, working, studying & entertaining. Tehransar site makes our dreams become true.

Tehransar Project
image from the architect

For the benefit of the project we have employed the notion of water in shape of a symbolic star which divides the building ground into 5 inhomogeneous zones:

Zone 1 & 2 for Shopping in an inspiring atmosphere
Zone 3 for entertainment & taking part in leisure activities
Zone 4 for accommodating cultural and educational facilities
Zone 5 for positioning hotels and first class accommodation possibilities

A network of circular road and suspended cable railway affords the internal connection of these zones with each other.


Tehransar Project Tehran, Iran - Building Information

Type: Public Development
Location: Tehran, Iran
Client: Private
Architect: Armin Daneshgar

Daneshgar Architects is an architectural practice led by Dr. Armin Daneshgar with its central office based in Vienna, Austria.
Source: e-architect.co.uk
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Design Narrative
Architecture Discussion by Lee Miles - 7 Sep 2010

TEHRANSAR:

The first project of two is Tehransar urban development, Tehran. A western fringe area of Tehran the area has a profound history of industry and enterprise. The design produced is by Dr Armin Daneshgar as his studio considers the best manner in which to regenerate the area as a new social and economic enterprise.

The Tehransar project represents a fantastic opportunity to raise the profile of Iranian design, and add another chapter to its long lineage, I hope its potential is reached and its native culture is retained, rather than overwritten. The project itself looks hugely ambitious, but also very realistic. Credit is surely due here to the architects for finding the correct balance between the idealistic, and the pragmatic.

In this sense it is a progressive piece, one that hints at the future of Tehran as growing city. And for this reason alone the project is absolutely vital. Visually the sinuous sweeps and angular landscape create an interesting and dynamic language. Aesthetically pleasing I’m sure this would provoke a sense of pride and joy from the residents, and envious glances from its neighbours.

Aside from the lack of regional relativity the design as explained seems to hinge around principles of modernism. The zoned areas appear like mechanical components of a great machine. But to consider an urban, inhabited, environment, as a mechanical entity has its perils. Throughout the 1950s oil rich South America appropriated the ideas of Le Corbusier, and CIAM, and applied them to their cities. Years later as urban living changed this met with disastrous results. Cities such as Brasilia are now burdened by this preference; the great spans of distance too far for any pedestrian to traverse, a dependence on the automobile, and zones of development too static and fixed to adapt to change. The Tehransar urban design should refer back to this perhaps, and reflect upon the lessons learned. In terms of logistics it seems well served by cable car and footpaths, and the geometry of the buildings is powerful and inspiring. But the large scale spans of land, the divide created by adding water, and the zoned top down approach, could be better refined to better create an epitome of Iranian urban design.

Iran has far greater heritage and history than most of its more famous, younger, Middle Eastern cousins. With a pre-history that narrowly supersedes the cradle of civilization that was ancient Mesopotamia, the republic has substantial architectural heritage. To neglect this would be a shame, and I am surprised to see this level of regionalism omitted from the project. The resulting visuals imply a distinctly generic style. In such sensitive projects emphasis must be upon a controlled dialogue of cultural exchange. Adopting a westernised approach is one way of handling the design; it is of course very valid and may appease the aspirational tastes of residents. But to really capitalise on the unique opportunity, and to empower the population with a unique identity may require a more organic and regionalised philosophy.

The most prominent and foremost observation, I feel, is it’s unfortunate lack of cultural identity as communicated via the visuals. The renders present an ambiguous environment, it is difficult to perceive how such benefits as high standards of living, working, studying & entertaining manifest, but also exist within the daily society of Tehransar. This unfortunately undermines the true valuable nature of the project. I am certain consideration has been paid to keeping the design relevant and contextualised, but with such a culturally significant site, the potential it represents is too incredible to go underused.

In an area as rich and animated as Tehran perhaps a more sophisticated and sensitive approach is needed, or at least portrayed through accurate visuals. However I feel this is a firm step forward, with strong conviction. To paraphrase Walter Gropius, architecture is often a great barometer of democracy. Architecture of this scale has the power to invoke real optimism, and I really hope the project is implemented with due consideration to the cultural identity it seeks to synchronize with, and further develops the urban landscape of Tehran.
e-architect.co.uk/articles/design_narrative.htm
 

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It doesn't look like one of those buildings that has an eternal beauty to it. I doubt it will always look good no matter what time or age we are living in. It might look nice now, but if built everybody would probably be driving past it talking about how ugly it is in a decades time, just like we do now with those awful buildings from the 60s and 70s.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
^^
I heard once IKIA's 3 phases are completed or atleast the second, they will close MEHR and switch the domestic flights also to IKIA and they will build on MEHR ground commercial buildings or a huge park (not sure)
Sounds great. Tehransar and Mehrabad will have a brand new image in 6 years then.
 

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^^It's just in a stage of an idea until now. We have to wait until IKIA is capable to manage both international and national passengers. But IKIA has big problems until yet.
Anyhow, it would be really great, if the huge area gets a park or anything else that Tehran needs, but due to lack of place it wasn't possible until then.
 

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I think it's ugly, it has to much wannebe modern looks.. They should build up a nice skyline in harmony, not just some weird ugly big ass buildings spreaded here and there.
 

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