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Israel's Bank Leumi to lead Tel Aviv rail funding

JERUSALEM, Nov 26 (Reuters) - The group planning to build a light rail system in Tel Aviv said on Monday it chose Bank Leumi to lead financing of part of the 10 billion shekel ($2.58 billion) project.

Leumi, Israel's second largest bank, will lead a consortium of Israeli banks in providing funding of up to 3 billion shekels towards financing the railway, said MTS, which will build and operate what will be Israel's largest intracity railway.

It said in a statement the funding would be completed by May of 2008 and comprise two parts -- a short-term loan for the time the system is being built and a longer-term loan for operating the railway.

The government is also providing part of the funding.

MTS is set to start work on the light rail system next year. The first 23 km line comprising 33 stations, part of which will be underground, is slated to open in 2014.

Investment firm Africa Israel leads the MTS group with a 22 percent stake. It also includes German engineering firm Siemens , Chinese infrastructure company CCECC, Portuguese firm Da Costa Soares , Dutch transport company HTM, and Israel's Egged bus cooperative.
 

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The metropolitan area of Tel Aviv, in Israel, is planned to have a public transport system consisting of four light rail lines and four BRT lines in the future.

The Red Line, the first line of the system, starts at Petah Tikva's Central Bus Station, east of Tel Aviv, and follows the Jabotinsky Road (Route 481) westwards at street level. At the point were Jabotinsky Road and Highway 4 intersect, the line drops into an underground tunnel for 10 km (6.21 mi) through Bnei Brak, Ramat Gan, and Tel Aviv, and emerges again to street level just before Jaffa, were it turns southwards towards Bat Yam. The length of the Red Line will be 23 km (14 mi). The line will have 33 stations, 10 of which will be in the underground section. Its completion/opening date will probably be 2017 at the earliest.
 

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This is the list of stations for the Red Line of the Tel Aviv Light Rail System (north to south). Stations in the underground portion are in bold.

Pinsker Street
Orlev Street
Dankner Street
Bellinson Hospital
Rabin Medical Centre
Shenkar Street
Em HaMoshavot Road(in a branch to LRT Depot)
Aharonovich Street
Ben Gurion Road
Bialik Street
Abba Hillel Road
Tel Aviv Central
Sha'ul HaMelech Boulevard
Yehudit Boulrvard
Carlebach Street
Allenby Street
Elifelet Street

Salame Road
Ben Tsvi Road
Erlich Street
Isakov Street
Baal Shem Tov Boulevard
Mahrozet Street
Ha'atzmaut Boulevard
Rothschild Street
Jabotinsky Street
Balfour Street
Yoseftal Street
29 November Street
Ha'Amal Street
Nisamboim Street
 
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nanar
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Price..but even Sofia build heavy metro or subway, and we can not compare Sofia with Tel Aviv, when money is on the table..Belgrade also decide to build hi capacity metro,there is a model,metro or subway tax for citizans ,companys etc.
But on long term it is more expensive to build LRT istead of Hevy Metro,capacity,time travel,maintaince.Well ,but i must say that configuration of soli ,position of the city,river or not it is very.significant.In Belgrade we conclude that Lrt cost almost same as Hevy metro.,but i must say that we have half of the city on hills,so you have to go undergorund and also,accros the river you can go either on the bridge or under the river .On New Belgrade side ground is flat and send ,so it will go possible on the viaduct or bridge.
On the end we all know that from global exprience to build a metro or subway system was always a political decision.
 

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nanar
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On the end we all know that from global exprience to build a metro or subway system was always a political decision.
Yes, the word "political" comes from the Greek word "polis" which means "city".

So a political decision is not systematical choice (always, everywhere), of subway vs LRT or others transports systems.

If anybody doesn't know well the concerned city, to say "LRT instead of subway is stupid idea" is possibly a stupid sentence. (mainly when some parts will be underground)
I know, you don't say "stupid", @dexmex. :)
 

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Best in your opinion of course. Many may well consider that LRT is the best, and of course those who make these decisions must weigh up what is best technically as well as what is affordable.

For example I would quite like to own a Mercedes AMG car because I think they are the best, but at the end of the day I can only afford a Toyota Camry. Sure I could go and work 2nd and 3rd jobs to afford that AMG (bit like raising taxes etc), but it is just not worth it, so I settle for my very capable, very sensible Toyota.
 

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Globes
http://www.globes.co.il/serveen/globes/docview.asp?did=1000858323&fid=1725
Tel Aviv light rail delayed until 2023
The project is six years behind the schedule set when it was nationalized in 2010, and NIS 3 billion over budget.
30 June 13 18:41, Amiram Barkat

The Tel Aviv light rail's red line will not be ready before 2023, states the project's Dutch auditor, Aegis, in an internal report sent to the Ministry of Finance. The new date is six years behind the current date of 2017.

The highly critical report is based on continuing delays in the project's timetable, NIS 3 billion in cost overruns, and the dismal relationship between NTA Metropolitan Mass Transit System Ltd. general manager Itzhak Zuchman and employees whom he suspects are close to the company's former chairman.

The Tel Aviv light rail project was originally a BOT (build-operate-transfer) project until the franchisee, Metro Transport Solutions (MTS), a consortium led by Africa-Israel Investments Ltd. (TASE:AFIL), was nationalized in December 2010, after it failed to secure financing. The government handed the project over to NTA, a government company which had been responsible for the light rail's infrastructures work. Minister of Transport Yisrael Katz urged the nationalization of the project, overcoming strong objections by then-Prime Minister's Office director general Eyal Gabay, who argued that the government could not do a better job than the private franchisee.

The decision to nationalize the Tel Aviv light rail states, "The project will be fully operational no later than 2017", and set a budget of NIS 10.7 billion. A few weeks ago, NTA estimated the project's budget at NIS 14 billion, saying that the cost overrun was due to the rise in the Consumer Price Index (CPI). However, a simple calculation shows that this factor added only NIS 600 million to the project's cost, leaving an unexplained gap of NIS 3.3 billion.

Under the timetable set in the government's nationalization decision, NTA was due to publish tenders for the main part of the light rail by the end of 2012, including for the procurement of rolling stock, the procurement of traffic and command and control systems, and the digging of subway tunnels by tunnel boring machines (TBM). None of the tenders have been published yet. At the last minute, publication of the rolling stock tender in the first quarter of 2013 was pushed back to September.

The Ministry of Finance said in response, "In line with the government decision, NTA is authorized to build the Tel Aviv light rail project. The company is therefore moving forward on the planning of the Red Line, and recently submitted the planning concept in which NTA will carry out the detailed planning. This concept was reviewed by an auditor on behalf of the Ministry of Finance and the Ministry of Transport, which recommended it. The communications procedures are not the responsibility of NTA by law."

NTA said in response, "The issue of the Dan Region light railway's timetable are still the subject of discussions between NTA, which is responsible for the project, and the auditor."

Published by Globes [online], Israel business news - www.globes-online.com - on June 30, 2013

© Copyright of Globes Publisher Itonut (1983) Ltd. 2013
 

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2023 is a long way off. Is it because all of it is underground or something?

Even building an above ground line only takes 3 or 4 years, max.
 

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Stupid idea why not just build subway system instead of a light rail
I subway line holds no particular advantage over light rail, PROVIDED that the urban planners can spare a dedicated lane for the LRT. The thing to avoid is that the LRT gets stuck in the same traffic jams as the car drivers. My knowledge of Tel Aviv is not spelendid, but I would think that the stretch from Jaffa past Bat Yam would allow to keep the LRT in separate lane?

The critics of this project might want to study the experiences from the first 1-2 metro lines in my native Copenhagen. The Danes are not exactly paupers, but for similar reasons they chose to keep more than half of the line overground.
 

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A light rail can never be as fast as a metro, unless there are no street crossings (full track separation) in which case the light rail pretty much is a metro. The only alternative is that the traffic lights are fully coordinated with the light rail and trains always have green light everywhere.
 

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For anyone not following the Israeli forum, they are digging shafts for the new subway in three locations: Herzl Street in Tel Aviv, Galei Gal (next to the central railway station) in Tel Aviv, and Em HaMoshavot (near the Kiryat Aryeh Railway Station) in Petah Tikva. Here are images from Herzl and Galei Gal:

Herzl corner Yehuda HaLevi, June 1, 2013:













Galei Gal, September 18, 2013:

 
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