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El Kmart de plaza es el mas grande de PR y uno de los mas grandes de USA. ademas solo hay kmart en autralia,new zeland,guam y saint croix, so no digan del caribe y america.
Exacto, las tiendas en general en Latinoamerica y Europa jamas y nunca son tan grandes como nuestros KMarts, Walmarts, etc.
 

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Gotham City
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American Samoa lawsuit seeks US citizenship

By : The Associated Press



PAGO PAGO, American Samoa - A lawsuit filed by five people from American Samoa argues they should be U.S. citizens by virtue of being born in the U.S. territory.The lawsuit filed this week in Washington, D.C., challenges the constitutionality of federal laws that make those born in American Samoa U.S. nationals but not citizens, like those born in other territories.
American Samoa is the only U.S. territory that doesn't grant citizenship by virtue of birth.
In Puerto Rico, territorial status grants residents U.S. citizenship, but they pay no federal income taxes and cannot vote in presidential elections. Their congressional representative also cannot vote in Congress.
Those born in American Samoa, home to 56,000, are considered nationals, who also don't pay federal income taxes and can't vote for president. Nationals must follow the same procedures for naturalization as those who are permanent legal residents, which includes taking tests on English proficiency and American civics, even though English is widely spoken in American Samoa and public schools teach U.S. history.
"If we are American Samoans, then why not citizens? I believe American Samoans deserve the same right and benefits as all other Americans," said lead plaintiff Leneuoti Tuaua.
Citizenship should be determined by the flag under which someone is born, said Charles Alailima, one of the attorneys representing the group. "The plaintiffs here should not have to ask to be United States citizens."
A U.S. passport issued to those born in American Samoa notes the bearer is a national and not a citizen.
To be eligible to apply for naturalization, those born in American Samoa must leave the territory and live in a state for at least three months. Many say the hassle and expense of the naturalization process prevents them from pursuing citizenship.
American Samoa's nonvoting delegate in Congress introduced a bill earlier this year to make it easier for those living in the territory to become U.S. citizens. Delegate Eni Faleomavaega's bill, which is pending, would allow applying for naturalization directly from American Samoa.
"Among other things, many federal, state and municipal laws require that a person be a U.S. citizen in order to enjoy certain civil, political and economic liberties, such as the right to vote, serve on a jury, bear arms and hold certain forms of public sector employment," the lawsuit argues.
According to the complaint, Tuaua wanted to pursue a law enforcement career in California, but couldn't because of his status as a U.S. national. Tuaua and fellow plaintiffs Fanuatanu Mamea and Emy Afalava live in the territory. Plaintiff Vaaleama Fosi lives in Honolulu, while Taffy-Lei Maene lives in Seattle.
"Recognition by the United States that all persons born in American Samoa are U.S. citizens would significantly advance the Samoan Federation's efforts to increase the political voice of the Samoan community," said the Carson, Calif., nonprofit group, also named as a plaintiff, of allowing American Samoa-born nationals living in the United States a chance to vote for president.


http://www.caribbeanbusinesspr.com/news03.php?nt_id=74013&ct_id=1&ct_name=1
 

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Gotham City
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Congress freezes minimum wage in American Samoa

By CB Online Staff / The Associated Press



PAGO PAGO, American Samoa — Congress passed a bill this week to freeze American Samoa’s minimum wage, responding to employer concerns and a government financial report that suggest automatic increases were harming the U.S. territory’s economy.The U.S. territory’s minimum pay was set to increase by 50 cents in September, but that now stands to be delayed until 2015.
The Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2007 provided for annual 50-cents per hour increases until the rate matched the rest of the United States, where the minimum pay is $7.25 per hour. Increases for 2010 and 2011 were previously delayed by another federal law. The last increase went into effect in 2009, the day after a tsunami killed 34 people in the territory and the same day a tuna cannery shut down.
Minimum wage in American Samoa varies from $4.18 to $5.59 per hour, depending on the industry. The lowest wage is for garment workers and the highest is for those in the stevedoring and maritime shipping industry. Tuna canneries make up the largest private employer, where the rate is $4.76.
The territory’s communal land system allows for many people to live rent-free with their families. A majority of American Samoa land is communally owned by families. But everyday household items need to be shipped to the island, making them much more expensive than in most parts of the U.S.
A report last year by the U.S. Government Accountability Office said employment in American Samoa has declined because of the minimum wage increases that began in 2007. The 142-page report said the decrease in employment was a result of losing a tuna cannery in American Samoa. Employers blamed the minimum wage increase for layoffs, work hour reductions and hiring freezes.
America Samoa’s nonvoting delegate in the U.S. House of Representatives, Eni H. Faleomavaega, said the Senate bill was overwhelmingly approved Tuesday, 378-11. While he supported it, "I take no happiness in the successful passage of this bill because I still stand for fair wages for American Samoa’s workers," he said. "So between now and 2015, it will be up to the American Samoa government and our corporate partners, including StarKist and Tri-Marine, to find new ways of succeeding without further compromising the wages of our fish cleaners because I cannot promise that I will support any more delays after this."
The measure now goes to the president, who is expected to sign it.



Three years ago, StarKist Co. announced the reduction of some 800 positions at StarKist Samoa, citing a competitive industry and higher labor costs. Spokeswoman Mary Sestric said the company is hopeful Congress will again delay the next scheduled increase.
StarKist workers on a morning shift Wednesday declined to comment on the delay.
American Samoa Gov. Togiola Tulafono has said the 2009 cannery closure led to unemployment reaching nearly 20 percent by 2010.
“Congress is to be thanked for preventing further economic calamity in American Samoa and preventing continual increases to the minimum wage which would have led to additional layoffs in our fragile economy,” said local Chamber of Commerce Chairman David Robinson.
Fed report recommends minimum wage cut in Puerto Rico
A recent Federal Reserve Bank of New York report on Puerto Rico’s economic competitiveness included a recommendation that policymakers on the Caribbean island consider lowering the minimum wage as a first step toward improving the island’s dismal jobs scene.
Puerto Rico’s economy has been underperforming for decades and has yet to show concrete signs that it is pulling out of a long and deep downturn that stretches back some six years, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York said in the report issued at the Puerto Rico Chamber of Commerce Convention earlier this month.
The “Report on the Competitiveness of Puerto Rico’s Economy” highlights the challenges facing Puerto Rico’s economy and offers five policy recommendations to make the island more competitive.
The report’s first recommendation is to reduce barriers to job creation and labor participation. New York Fed President William Dudley flagged high unemployment and low labor participation as perhaps the biggest challenges to the Puerto Rico economy.
“Creating jobs and encouraging active participation in the labor market should be a top priority for policymakers,” the report said.
The Fed noted that opportunities for the young and less educated in Puerto Rico are particularly limited, and these workers are in danger of becoming disconnected from the labor market.
“We recommend focusing on policies that spur the creation of job opportunities and improve incentives to work,” the Fed said.
One possible first step would be to consider a young-worker subminimum wage that targets workers under the age of 25. The minimum could be stepped up at regular intervals as the worker continues employment and builds skills with a given firm, so that the worker’s wage would match the federal minimum over a number of years.
The Fed report said a wider reexamination of the application of the federal minimum wage and the design of entitlement programs may also be warranted in order to improve incentives to seek employment and increase the number of jobs available for workers on the island.


http://www.caribbeanbusinesspr.com/news03.php?nt_id=74318&ct_id=1&ct_name=1
 

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Starkist Caribe cerró hace años tal vez para mudarse a Samoa. Y miren ahora. La operación en Puerto Rico tal vez era difícil de justificar con el paso de los años porque el atún que se procesaba en Mayagüez venía del Oceano Pacífico. Había que viajar la mitad del mundo para procesarlo.
 

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SIN PELOS EN LA...LENGUA
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2,677 Posts
American Samoa lawsuit seeks US citizenship

By : The Associated Press



PAGO PAGO, American Samoa - A lawsuit filed by five people from American Samoa argues they should be U.S. citizens by virtue of being born in the U.S. territory.The lawsuit filed this week in Washington, D.C., challenges the constitutionality of federal laws that make those born in American Samoa U.S. nationals but not citizens, like those born in other territories.
American Samoa is the only U.S. territory that doesn't grant citizenship by virtue of birth.
In Puerto Rico, territorial status grants residents U.S. citizenship, but they pay no federal income taxes and cannot vote in presidential elections. Their congressional representative also cannot vote in Congress.
Those born in American Samoa, home to 56,000, are considered nationals, who also don't pay federal income taxes and can't vote for president. Nationals must follow the same procedures for naturalization as those who are permanent legal residents, which includes taking tests on English proficiency and American civics, even though English is widely spoken in American Samoa and public schools teach U.S. history.
"If we are American Samoans, then why not citizens? I believe American Samoans deserve the same right and benefits as all other Americans," said lead plaintiff Leneuoti Tuaua.
Citizenship should be determined by the flag under which someone is born, said Charles Alailima, one of the attorneys representing the group. "The plaintiffs here should not have to ask to be United States citizens."
A U.S. passport issued to those born in American Samoa notes the bearer is a national and not a citizen.
To be eligible to apply for naturalization, those born in American Samoa must leave the territory and live in a state for at least three months. Many say the hassle and expense of the naturalization process prevents them from pursuing citizenship.
American Samoa's nonvoting delegate in Congress introduced a bill earlier this year to make it easier for those living in the territory to become U.S. citizens. Delegate Eni Faleomavaega's bill, which is pending, would allow applying for naturalization directly from American Samoa.
"Among other things, many federal, state and municipal laws require that a person be a U.S. citizen in order to enjoy certain civil, political and economic liberties, such as the right to vote, serve on a jury, bear arms and hold certain forms of public sector employment," the lawsuit argues.
According to the complaint, Tuaua wanted to pursue a law enforcement career in California, but couldn't because of his status as a U.S. national. Tuaua and fellow plaintiffs Fanuatanu Mamea and Emy Afalava live in the territory. Plaintiff Vaaleama Fosi lives in Honolulu, while Taffy-Lei Maene lives in Seattle.
"Recognition by the United States that all persons born in American Samoa are U.S. citizens would significantly advance the Samoan Federation's efforts to increase the political voice of the Samoan community," said the Carson, Calif., nonprofit group, also named as a plaintiff, of allowing American Samoa-born nationals living in the United States a chance to vote for president.


http://www.caribbeanbusinesspr.com/news03.php?nt_id=74013&ct_id=1&ct_name=1
Mientras en Puerto Rico los independentistas y soberanistas de cartón quieren separarnos de Estados Unidos, en otros territorios claman por la igualdad. Que bueno es querer separarse de Estados Unidos, como gritan los seudo patriotas fupistas revoltosos que a cada rato sacan la cara del Ché o de Albizu, pero cogen el cheque de la Beca Pell. Eso sí es hacer la patria. Y luego dicen: "Más que eso nos deben". Sí Ajá, en serio...? Jajaja. POr eso cada elección bajan más. Ya van por el 2 y pico porciento. Yo creo que en estas definitivamente se extinguen. Lo único que salvaría a los albizuístas revoltosos minoritarios es que la US Fish and Wildlife Service los ponga en la categoría de especies en peligro de extinción. :lol:
 

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El Cholero
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26 Posts
estan bonitas las fotos de las demas 3 territorios americanas en el pacifico...hay que acabar de destacar que la población de Guam en total es casi par a la población de Carolina en Puerto Rico...las NMI como Caguas y Samoa Americana como Fajardo

ahora bien...Guam se parece mucho a Puerto Rico debido a que es la isla más popular y desarollada de las islas marianas...y Puerto Rico en realidad tiene una economia casi par a las Islas Canarias de España o Portugal...si hablo en serio PR si e sun país independiente sería la más rica de latinoamerica (hasta más rico que Chile,Argentina y Mexico)...los 114 años que formó como un territorio alejada de los americanos les evolucionaron una mentalidad norteamericana con sabor latino...ósea PR es casi identica a España en las infraestructura y economía corporal...lo malo que tiene PR es que como dicen los portugueses..es un estado sin personalidad Jurídica es decir no se sabe si es un pais o terrorrio americana...por muchos Puerto Rico es un semi-país y su nombre Estado Libre Asociada se le traduce a Free Associated State la cual en verdad is y no una mancomunidad (commonwealth) ya que no es un estado integral norteamericana
 

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Puerto Rico funciona como los 50 estados en muchísimas cosas.

Sobre la población, hace poco escuché que Puerto Rico solamente tiene más población que todos los territorios fuera de los 48 estados continentales incluyendo Alaska y Hawaii. O sea, sumamos las poblaciones de estos dos estados, Islas Vírgenes, Guam, Samoa, Marianas y todos los demás y todavía no igualamos la población de Puerto Rico.
 

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Banned
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172 Posts
Que problema con esta gente de AS, les dan pasaporte, pero no son ciudadanos. Hmmmm esto como que está enredado.
 

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Asistente Moderador SSCPR
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