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Okay so I completely forgot about Gateshead East and West!

So there is 11 in total, I miscounted my original list (i'm not so good at this as it turns out 😂)

Core Area as defined by council plan
(Jesmond does creep in, but let's ignore that one, what I was trying to define was which railway stations built as stops for Newcastle or Gateshead 'Centre'.)

I counted Manors as one.

Named so far...

1.) Central
2.) Manors combined
3.) Gateshead East
4.) Gateshead West
5.) Forth Street
6.) Oakwellgate
7.) Greensfield
8.) Redheugh
9.) New Bridge St./ Carliol Square
10.) ?
11.) ?
 

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No.9 ;were two separate stations belonging to different railways when built .
No.3 & 4 ; A strange one , at times treated as two stations by the railway but run as one
 

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There was a temp station on the Quayside at Close, there's the New Bridge St Yds that might have had passengers, there was Byker stn, roughly under Morrisons, Heaton& Byker and St Peters, but some of those might be too far out.
 

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The Close was to receive passengers from Redheugh by boat before the rail bridges were built and it didnt have a rail connection-but good call. New Bridge St and Carliol Square were separate stations as Sielfield said. Shot Tower is definitely one of them as the temporary terminus of the Newcastle and Carlisle-it’s sometimes incorrectly known as Railway St. Dunston might be outside your area
Forth St is distinct from Forth, the former being a goods station.
 

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1.) Central
2.) Manors combined
3.) Gateshead East
4.) Gateshead West
5.) Forth Street
6.) Oakwellgate
7.) Greensfield
8.) Redheugh
9.) New Bridge St./ Carliol Square
10.) Railway Street
11.) The Close

Yes, the The Close was a kind of trick question. Although not a Railway 'Station' it was a place to go to get a train (albeit not directly!)

I'm currently reading The High Level Bridge and Newcastle Central Station by John Addyman and Bill Fawcett published for the 150 year anniversary of the two.

Fascinating history of the rival railway as it tried further and further to encroach into Newcastle and then over the Tyne.

Admittedly, I always thought that Carliol and NBS station were the same. Can see now i was wrong. Got there in the end though!
 

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Newcastle Infirmary planned as the Newcastle and Carlisle terminus with plans deposited in 1840 and actually shown as extant on the 1841 Collard map.
Pilgrim St on land acquired next to the Royal Arcade as the planned terminus of the Newcastle and North Shields,Carliol Square always being thought of as temporary.
Spital was acquired but no plans laid as access to the quay was seen as more important, the N and C had agreed to build a new quay at Skinnerburn to Herds House and an inclined plane/stationary engine would take the railway down to the river. The quay was never completed, though started by Grainger. Interestingly the stationary engine worked incline was opened from Redheugh up to Greenesfield and you can still see this alignment and the enlarged arch for it under the KEB.
 

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According to The High Level Bridge and Newcastle Central Station by John Addyman and Bill Fawcett, the Newcastle and Carlisle Railway were the first group to propose railways in Newcastle, to improve Tyne Valley links as the only other road was the Hadrian's Wall Military road built in the Jacobean conflict.

Their initial 1825 plan was a railway, much like what eventually occurred South of the River, that straddled the North Bank of the Tyne all the Way to the Tyne Bridge.
However, as authorised in 1829 but never built, was a line that went North of the Infirmary to Thornton Street.

Instead, this line was built up to Railway Street in 1839, where for 8 year this was used as a terminus until the line was extended to Forth St. looping South of the Infirmary in 1847.
 
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