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Where is this reflection and what is it?


Looks like it is the "Dirty Angel", as we have always known it in our family! The South African War Memorial, for those who died in the Boer War, to be more accurate.



The reflection looks like it may be on (though the actual 'angle' doesn't look quite right for this) the office block next to Haymarket Hub that is the converted Tatler Cinema (though many people think the Tatler building was demolished).

I like the photo, very unusual!
 

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Looks like it is the "Dirty Angel", as we have always known it in our family! The South African War Memorial, for those who died in the Boer War, to be more accurate.

The reflection looks like it may be on (though the actual 'angle' doesn't look quite right for this) the office block next to Haymarket Hub that is the converted Tatler Cinema (though many people think the Tatler building was demolished).

I like the photo, very unusual!
Got it in one........:)

The angel was of course removed during the construction of the Metro Station and Haymarket and was repaired and cleaned up before re-attachment. Those repairs in 1975-78 included the replacement of Victory's wings being replaced in fibreglass, the Newcastle atmosphere over the years having destroyed the bronze to such an extent that they were in danger of dropping off! - further repairs and refurbishment took place in 1992.

Always strikes me as rather sad that this memorial perhaps doesn't get the recognition that it deserves, By that I mean there are no remembrance ceremonies held here as far as I know. Fair enough there will be no one alive today who fought in the Boer War but I'm sure you get my drift.

Unveiled by Sir Laurence James Oliphant (General Officer Commanding in Chief for Northern Command) on 22 June 1908.

The memorial had originally been planned to be raised by public subscription but increased expenditure and delays to the build led to the City Council having to subsidise the cost. Cost was £4,707 and only £3,350 had been raised by the public.

The memorial was to commemorate those who fell in the Boer War and the sculptor was Thomas Eyre Mackin. The figure on the top represents Victory and the figure below is Northumbria offering her palm to her fallen sons who are listed on the four shields around the base. Every local soldier who fought in the war was given the honorary freedom of the city.

Grade II* Listed, this is the text from http://lbonline.english-heritage.org.uk/BuildingDetailsForm.aspx?id=304624&search=y

Building Name: SOUTH AFRICAN WAR MEMORIAL
Parish: NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE
District: NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE
County: TYNE AND WEAR

LBS Number: 304624
Grade: II*
Date Listed: 12/11/1965
NGR: NZ2481164862

NZ 2464 NE NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE HAYMARKET
16/306
12/11/65 South African War Memorial
(formerly listed in Barras Bridge)
G.V. II*

War Memorial. Dated and signed T.EYRE MACIKLIN INVT ET SCULPT 1907; inscribed - Montacutelli. brothers, founders, London, on relief.

Sandstone ashlar with bronze sculpture. Wide octagonal steps to base with bronze shield, pictorial low relief panel and garlands; large figure at east bearing unfurled flag and clasping tall octagonal tapered column with inscription commemorating those of the Northumbrian regiments who died in the South African War, 1899-1902. Heroic-sized winged Victory on top.




 

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6ft of fun.
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Always strikes me as rather sad that this memorial perhaps doesn't get the recognition that it deserves, By that I mean there are no remembrance ceremonies held here as far as I know. Fair enough there will be no one alive today who fought in the Boer War but I'm sure you get my drift.
My Great Grandfather went to the Boer War with the Elswick Battery (he lied to be able to go, as he was under-age). I've got a piece of 'trench art' that he sent back home - a decorated pin cushion with 'Think of me' on it. he survived, obviously, otherwise I wouldn't be typing this now :lol:

One of the six field guns is on display at the TA centre in Blyth - we went to see it a few years ago, it was quite emotional!

Here's the back story, if anyone's unfamiliar - it's a crap website for adverts and popups, but the information is interesting.

http://socyberty.com/military/working-the-guns/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Elswick12pdr12cwtBoerWar.jpg

http://www.flickr.com/photos/newcastlelibraries/4089114986/ flikr/Newcastle Libraries

http://www.flickr.com/photos/newcastlelibraries/4089115506/in/photostream/ flikr/Newcastle Libraries
 

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Agreed, definitely Cross House, plenty of pictures of Cross House here . . .

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=63511757&postcount=1179
Yes that was quickly identified :)

The above link doesn't seem to work, so try this one @ http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?p=63534699&highlight=cross+house#post63534699

There is a good account of the fire of 23rd December 1919 @
http://www.bpears.org.uk/genuki/NBL/Newcastle/cross.html

Couple of shots taken, 3rd February 2011:



 

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cogito ergo sum
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One of my favourite buildings - I'm not quite sure why ;)
There could not be any rational explanation for that affinity!


The reception area is quite unusual in layout (and was moreso before it was re-designed internally about 10 or more years ago). I guess its largely due to the challenge of such an unusual shape (tapered towards the door vestibule) and slightly rising floor (with the door at the lowest point).
 

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cogito ergo sum
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So here's a little test:

1. Where is this?
2. What did it used to be?
3. What is it now?

Couldn't mistake that frontage.
Its the (former) synagogue on Eskdale Terrace in Jesmond, now the Art Department of Newcastle Central high School (and well worth a visit during one of their open days if you can manage it).
 

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Couldn't mistake that frontage.
Its the (former) synagogue on Eskdale Terrace in Jesmond, now the Art Department of Newcastle Central high School (and well worth a visit during one of their open days if you can manage it).
That was quick - must make these a little harder :)

Doers anyone know if this building is Listed? - I cannot see anything

Built in 1914-5 by Newcastle Architect Marcus Kenneth Glass in an Art Deco interpretation of Byzantine Revival style. This is the last intact Synagogue by Glass in the UK.

Evidently much of the interior features of the Synagogue were removed/remodelled when it was converted into the school building.

It was the former home of the Jesmond Hebrew Congregation which closed in 1986.





Some 1912 views from the City Library Collection @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/newcastlelibraries/4076488744/sizes/o/in/photostream/





 

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cogito ergo sum
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Evidently much of the interior features of the Synagogue were removed/remodelled when it was converted into the school building.
Yes, almost completely, though that magnificent window remains. There is now a floor thoughout the building at the level of the original balcony, which greatly increases the available space but has removed the opportunity to see and appreciate the scale, proportions and detailling of the synagogue.

Note too that the two 'tablets of stone' at the top of the facade were also removed. Thanks to these pictures, we can see how they completed the curved part of the facade more appropriately that the flat top in present times.
 

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OK - a non-illustrated question. Which church occupied that site before the synagogue was built there?
 

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cogito ergo sum
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I can't wait to learn the answer to that question. Whatever was there seems to have had a short life - I can see nothing on the 1867 map, no mention in Dendy (1904), my 1919 Godfrey Edition OS map of Jesmond ends just a few doors away, and it building must have begun well before 1920.

BTW WilfBurnsFan, I agree that there's surely no reason for us to confine these questions to pictorial clues. Any challenge to the grey matter is welcome (if it really is a challenge and not just a 'google-quiz'!).
 

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One of my favourite buildings - I'm not quite sure why ;)
Here's a sketch of CROSS HOUSE in 1760 when it was occupied by a "well to Newcastle Citizen" and is described as a 'mansion'. In those days it was in a desirable location surrounded by the homes of Newcastle's best families.

Evidently the buildings at this location have been known as Westgate House.

Amongst its occupants were Ralph Carr the founder of the "Old Bank" in Newcastle, he was living there in 1767. Later occupied by the Vicar from St John's Church, Rev. Henry Wildey Wright and it was known locally as St John' Vicarage. This occupation ceased in 1879 when the Rev. Wright moved to Charlotte Square and the house was then devoted to business use with the old name being retained.

The sketch is by Mr W H Knowles.

(Source : North Country Lore and Legend - August 1889)

 

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That was quick - must make these a little harder :)

Doers anyone know if this building is Listed? - I cannot see anything
It is not listed but it is on the LOCAL LIST.

ID: 85. Former Jesmond Synagogue (Central New High School for Girls),
Eskdale Terrace, Jesmond,
Ward: South Jesmond
Original Nomination Number: 173

Unfortunately can't get the remaining text to copy properly!!

Have a look here, on page 81;
http://www.newcastle.gov.uk/wwwfileroot/regen/ldf/Local_List_List_of_Sites.pdf

Cheers
GBDT
 
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