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I am not sure you can take this to the bank, but..... look at the scrolls with lions heads in Prudhoe Chare and compare to this blow up from a photo of the Town hall. This is a door on the Eastern side.



I m not 100% sure but they look identical.

There are also what appear to be some bearded faces in above the windows on the second floor [southern edge, between the corinthian columns]. They look like the ones in the Chare.

Actually as an aside have't they got the column order wrong; thought it was meant to be; doric, ionic, corinthian, composite etc.

This might be a wild goose chase, but was the town hall built in 1881 ?

Have lightened the Old Town Hall photo up a bit, and I think you are right!


 

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Not wishing to interrupt Growly Graces "Quiz Question" (above) but just a note to say that the discussion about the re-located Historical Artefacts, from the 'Old Town Hall', 'Old Central Library' and the 'Blackett Street YMCA' etc, is now taking place on the Historic Newcastle thread.
 

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It's tucked away behind the Hanc... sorry, Great North Museum and is part of (demolished) Hospital of the Virgin Mary (or possibly the Holy Jesus) that was on that site, before being rebuilt as sheltered housing down the road at Spital Tongues
 

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Yes it is Mr Wilf, and it's a bit of a surprise when you see it, it remindeds me of Eric Gill.
Would it be there because it's our side the city walls? And is that why the site up at Claremount Road belongs to them because it well out side?
 

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It's tucked away behind the Hanc... sorry, Great North Museum and is part of (demolished) Hospital of the Virgin Mary (or possibly the Holy Jesus) that was on that site, before being rebuilt as sheltered housing down the road at Spital Tongues
So is this incorporated into the building itself, i.e. the Hancock Museum, and is it a new feature?
 

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Hopefully a photo will appear! if not I'll try something else.

Where is this? and Why is it there?

.

It's tucked away behind the Hanc... sorry, Great North Museum and is part of (demolished) Hospital of the Virgin Mary (or possibly the Holy Jesus) that was on that site, before being rebuilt as sheltered housing down the road at Spital Tongues
Yes it is Mr Wilf, and it's a bit of a surprise when you see it, it reminds me of Eric Gill. Would it be there because it's out side the city walls? And is that why the site up at Claremount Road belongs to them because it well out side?

Courtesy of Wikipedia @ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spital_Tongues

St Mary Magdalene Hospital

The first St Mary Magdalene Hospital was founded in the 12th century to care for victims of leprosy, the disease having been brought into Britain by the returning Crusaders. This was sited well outside the town, close to the present-day site of Lloyds TSB bank at the northern end of Northumberland Street. The St Mary Magdalene Hospital was a hospital in the medieval rather than the modern sense, concerned not with curing but with caring. Today, such an establishment would be called an almshouse.

In 1874, the hospital was moved to a new location behind the Hancock Museum, before in turn being replaced in 1959 by 38 purpose-built bungalows in Spital Tongues. These properties are still collectively known as St Mary Magdalene Hospital.

In 1884 the St Mary Magdalene charity opened the Home for Incurables in Moor Lodge, Spital Tongues. Moor Lodge had been built on land that had belonged to the charity for centuries. The charity had previously leased the house and grounds to William Hunter (the coal owner after whom the nearby Hunters Moor was named), so had to pay £500 for the surrender of the lease at this time.

A new home, still extant today, was designed by the architect Edward Shrewbrook and opened with great ceremony in 1893. This occupied the site of the Moor Lodge kitchen garden, and was extended with the addition of the Richardson Wing (providing beds for children) in 1911. The name of the hospital was later changed to St Mary Magdalene Home in 1931 (the same year that the original Moor Lodge was finally demolished, having previously reverted to use as a private dwelling), and it was renamed Hunters Moor Hospital upon becoming part of the National Health Service in 1948. Hunters Moor Hospital was home for the Regional Neurological Rehabilitation Centre until 2007 when the Centre moved to new purpose built accommodation at Walkergate Hospital. The site of Hunters Moor Hospital has been acquired by Dame Allan's Schools for development as a purpose built primary school.
 

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Hi Greg

That's WESTGATE HILL GRANGE - former offices of Stephen Eastern and last time I looked was empty.

The buildings itself isn't Grade Listed but the Griffins at the main door are.
This information courtesy of http://list.english-heritage.org.uk/resultsingle.aspx?uid=1338566



Westgate Hill Grange was built for Mr. John Edward Bowser who was Managing Director of The Bamboro Steamship Limited.
Took a look at this building this afternoon and what a state it is in - high fences up, front is completely overgrown and the place looks really run down.

Also the Grade Listed Griffin's appear to have been removed :eek:hno:
 

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that's useful, but I think it's the squarer shaped one behind - if you superimpose where St Matthews would be built later, it would be on top of all but the Northern part of that building and then would fit the description in the Summerhill area pdf we mentioned earlier.
Well I had a snoop around that area this afternoon and I cannot say that I found any trace of Summer Hill. If any part of it does exist today then it is well tucked away behind St Matthews Church and what I assume to be the workshop of the now defunct Stephen Easten.

 

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Stephen Easten was quite an interesting chap. he was a long-serving councillor in the early C20, was Lord Mayor the year the Tyne Bridge opened (and copped a knighthood for it), and served as chairman of the Corporation Estates and Properties Committee for a long while. He was vehemently against the development of municipal housing in Newcastle, so it was perhaps a bit of a surprise - when the Health Ministry (which also covered housing) was founded after WW1 - that Easten took a job as a senior adviser on housing policy, helping to provide 'homes for heroes'.
 

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Stephen Easten was quite an interesting chap. he was a long-serving councillor in the early C20, was Lord Mayor the year the Tyne Bridge opened (and copped a knighthood for it), and served as chairman of the Corporation Estates and Properties Committee for a long while. He was vehemently against the development of municipal housing in Newcastle, so it was perhaps a bit of a surprise - when the Health Ministry (which also covered housing) was founded after WW1 - that Easten took a job as a senior adviser on housing policy, helping to provide 'homes for heroes'.
Sir Stephen Easten, O.B.E., J.P.
Born in 1867 in Lowick, Northumberland, Stephen Easten moved to Newcastle in 1887 and set up a building firm in 1888. He was elected to the City Council in 1906, was sheriff in 1917.18 and Lord Mayor in 1923.4 and 1927.8. Knighted in 1929, he died in 1936.
Source : Tyne & Wear Archives @ http://www.tyneandweararchives.org.uk/DServe2/dserve.exe?dsqIni=Dserve.ini&dsqApp=Archive&dsqCmd=Show.tcl&dsqDb=Catalog&dsqSearch=(RefNo='DX763')&dsqPos=0
 

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Here's a riddle for you all . . .
What part of Newcastle do we think is being discussed here:-

"No description can convey an idea of it; and accordingly, Ben Jonson amused himself by describing it as an enigma."

And this is part of that enigma, in rhyme:
My altitude high, my body four square,
My foot in the grave, my head in the air,
My eyes in my sides, five tongues in my womb,
Thirteen heads upon my body, four images alone


It would be nice to think that some on here might attempt to deduce this without 'Googling' for references! Clues available tomorrow if necc.
 

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Here's that rhyme in full:
' My altitude high, my body four square,
' My foot in the grave, my head in the air,
' My eyes in my sides, five tongues in my womb,
' Thirteen heads upon my body, four images alone ;
' I can direct you where the wind doth stay,
' And I tune God's precepts twice a day.
' I am seen where I am not, I am heard where I is not,
' Tell me now what I am, and see that you miss not."
 
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