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Bring Constantinople back
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm looking for information about the Thai Canal project.
This canal could reduce distance between Japan/Chian and Middle Est/Europe and let ships avoid the Strait of Malacca and it's pirats.

Here is a map with the 3 existing routes: Malacca, Sunda and Lombok/Makassar. All of them are dangerous beause of maritime piracy.
 

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I really hope they create that Canal but I believe Singapore would probably object to it since a huge part of their income is from their ports.
 

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^I dun think S"pore will object..they'll probably get a big stake in the project.

Malaysia with the co-operation of China and Iran will construct a kind of 'Kra canal' like pipeline to transport oil across the Northern part of the Malay Peninsular.

Apparently China wants to bypass the Straits of Malacca which is considered a US influenced territory.Meanwhile, China has a naval base in Myanmar and their influence on te pipeline is secured.SO in the future, there'll be less prospects of a US embargo or blockade on oil supplies to China. Malaysia,having displayed its neutrality in the past is proven as excellent partner for this project.
 

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Proud Torontonian
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Yeah, you can be sure that Singapore will either be offered a part of the project or be given huge compensation.
 

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凹凸
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New pipeline to bypass Malacca Strait

Kuala Lumpur (Agencies) - Malaysian, Indonesian and Saudi Arabian firms on Monday signed agreements for construction of a pipeline that aims to divert 20 per cent of oil flowing through the strategic Malacca Strait, the project owner said.

The pipeline would also bypass Thailand, which has long debated a similar project across the southern isthmus. The new pipeline is to avoid Thailand by several kilometres by cutting through all three Malaysian border states, but just below the Thai frontier.

Malaysia's Trans-Peninsula Petroleum Sdn Bhd said it signed an agreement with Malaysia's Ranhill Engineers and Constructors Sdn Bhd and Indonesia's PT Tripatra to build the pipeline at an estimated cost of $7 billion over seven years.

Trans-Peninsula Petroleum, the owner and promoter of the project, said it signed separate memoranda of understanding with Bakrie and Brothers of Indonesia to supply pipes, while Al-Banader International Group of Saudi Arabia will provide the oil.

Prime Minister Abdullah Ahmad Badawi first announced the development earlier this month as part of the government's effort to develop Malaysia's northern region.

"We have always wanted to do more for that area and that also will take care of the eastern corridor," he said at the time.

Badawi witnessed the signing with Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono on the sidelines of the annual World Islamic Economic Forum, aimed at boosting cooperation among Muslim communities.

"When the entire project is completed in 2014, TRANSPEN pipeline will divert about 20 per cent of oil transiting through Straits of Malacca, proportionately easing the congestion in the Straits," Trans-Peninsula said in a statement.

Half of the world's oil shipments currently pass through the 960-kilometre (595-mile) Strait of Malacca, the busiest seaway in the world, which links the Indian Ocean and the South China Sea.

The Strait was notorious for pirate attacks but security officials, who fear the economic and strategic ramifications of any disruption to the vital maritime traffic, say security has vastly improved.

"Everyone can use the pipeline. It is to direct traffic away from the international waterway of the Straits of Malacca," Rahim Kamil Sulaiman, chairman of Trans-Peninsula Petroleum, told a news conference.

In its statement, Trans-Peninsula said the pipeline, about 300 kilometres in length, will cut across Malaysia's northern states of Kedah, Perak and Kelantan. It will have support facilities for deep-draught tankers at either end.

Rahim said the oil will come mainly from the Middle East but also from Africa for "the East Asian oil market".

He said "we have made known our projects to both China and Japan, especially China".

Government data in China say the country's crude oil consumption rose 7.1 per cent year-on-year in 2006.

Phase one of the oil pipeline project is expected to begin in 2008 after land acquisition and environmental and social impact assessments, Trans-Peninsula Petroleum said.

Plans call for an initial 48-inch (122-centimetre) pipeline with a throughput of two million barrels a day and storage capacity of 60 million barrels. It would be operational by 2011, the company said.

After four to five years of operation, capacity would be upgraded to a maximum of 180 million barrels of storage and six million barrels per day throughput, it said.

Deputy Prime Minister Najib Razak has said the proposed project was intended to reduce transport costs and security risks for tankers on the Malacca Strait.

"It's a very expensive solution to a problem that doesn't seem that severe, frankly," said Jason Feer, of energy market analysts Argus Media Ltd in Singapore.

While traders would save three days' sailing time, the logistics involved and the cost of using the pipeline would leave "a pretty marginal benefit," he said.

"In the end, the big test will be, will banks loan them money to build this?" Feer said.
 

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The concept is quite good, since the Strait of Malacca has a huge piracy problem as well. However, what's the elevation difference on the two sides? Will there be a lot of locks to make the crossing?
 

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Grand canal is a vision of the future
24 August 2015
China Daily Excerpt

The plan to build a huge waterway in Thailand would help stimulate regional and global trade

China's Belt and Road Initiative will gradually reshape Eurasia, but within this grand vision of a new Silk Road, it is the construction of the Kra Canal in southern Thailand that could have the greatest impact.

No official announcement has been made on the realization of this gigantic infrastructure project, but some analysts and business insiders are expressing support for a waterway that would connect the Andaman Sea and the Gulf of Thailand at the latitude of the Kra Isthmus, the narrowest part of the Malay Peninsula in southern Thailand.

The canal, which would cost at least $30 billion, about 8 percent of Thailand's GDP, and take 10 years to build, would not only create jobs in the country and beyond, but also facilitate global trade and stand as a symbol of international collaboration.

An artificial channel connecting the Indian Ocean and the Far East would affect the geopolitical dynamics of Southeast Asia, but it would not have to be detrimental to the core interests of Singapore, whose proximity to the Strait of Malacca has been an element of its success.

In the context of rapidly growing economic exchanges between Asia, western Eurasia and Africa, the Kra Canal would not be a substitute for the Strait of Malacca but a necessary complement. A quarter of internationally traded goods crossing the Strait of Malacca have congested the stretch of water between the Malay peninsula and Sumatra. As China heads toward becoming the world's largest economy, the opening of another trading conduit closer to continental Southeast Asia is the answer to an objective need.

In the long term, the flourishing economy of Thailand would not hurt any member of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, but the prosperity of 67 million Thai people would enrich an increasingly important grouping.

By shortening the distance between the Indian Ocean and the Far East by more than 1,000 kilometers, the Kra Canal would benefit international business. It would also create new opportunities for the countries located close to the new route. In shaping a general diplomatic environment favorable to the realization of the artificial waterway, the options offered to Myanmar and Vietnam should be studied and emphasized.
 

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this is good idea,but if these plans happen. That means making port in the Straits of Malacca (Malaysia and Singapore) will be deserted
 

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They haven't started yet? I can understand why China may have decided to put the Nicaragua canal on the back-burner (it being on the other side of the world), but this one is right in their backyard.
 

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Surprised this wasn't posted yet:

Thailand rejects Kra Canal idea

Michael Mackey
12 October 2015


Senior officials have underscored the Thai government's clear rejection of plans to build a canal crossing the Kra Isthmus in southern Thailand.

"It won't happen because it's not feasible," Chula Sukmanop, then-director general of the Marine Department told IHS Maritime.

The second problem is the cost of the project fails to bring sufficient returns although if built it would make Asia-Europe shipping routes three to five days faster by cutting out the need to go via Singapore and its congested waters.

"The cost of investment when we consider the return is not [worth it]," Sukmanop added.

However, Sukmanop said there would be another plan to boost investment at ports on the southern coasts, the Andaman Sea on the west, and the Gulf of Thailand on the east, and connect them with land infrastructure to allow goods to move across Thailand.

"There is going to be a railway," Sukmanop said. Plans for a rail network connecting the two ports, Satun on the Andaman and Songkhla on the Gulf of Thailand had been submitted with an environmental impact assessment for the project pending, he added.

Sukmanop's remarks follow a statement on the official news agency National News Bureau of Thailand (NNT) that the Ministry of Foreign Affairs had "brushed aside rumours" of a Thailand-China deal to build a canal through the Kra Isthmus.
 
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