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Rahim Katchi
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Mimar Koca Sinan (d. 1588), the 'Great Architect Sinan', was appointed chief royal architect to the Ottoman court by Sultan Süleyman I in 1539. During his fifty-year career he designed and constructed hundreds of buildings, including mosques, palaces, tombs, schools, madrasas, hospitals, hospices, caravanserais, aqueducts and bridges. The most celebrated of all Ottoman architects, Sinan is renowned in particular for his mosques, where his inventive experimentation with centralized domed spaces -- often compared with parallel developments in Renaissance Italy -- produced monuments in which the central dome appears weightless and the interior surfaces are bathed in light. His distinctive architectural idiom left its imprint on the Ottoman capital of Istanbul, and across the vast empire that extended from the Danube to the Tigris.
 

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Rahim Katchi
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1,048 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
The Şehzade Mosque

Şehzade Camii is an Ottoman imperial mosque located in the district of Fatih, on the third hill of Istanbul, Turkey. It is sometimes referred to as the “Prince's Mosque” in English.

The Şehzade Mosque was commissioned by Sultan Suleiman I in memory of his eldest son, Prince Mehmet, who died of smallpox at the age of 21 in 1543, though the cause for his death is disputed. It was the first major commission by the Imperial Architect Mimar Sinan, and was completed in 1548. It is considered by architectural historians as Sinan's first masterpiece of classical Ottoman architecture.

http://en.wikipedia.org
 
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