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How will you vote on June 23?

  • Leave

    Votes: 30 27.8%
  • Leave but unlikely to vote

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Stay

    Votes: 68 63.0%
  • Stay but unlikely to vote

    Votes: 6 5.6%
  • Undecided but will vote

    Votes: 3 2.8%
  • Undecided and unlikely to vote

    Votes: 1 0.9%

  • Total voters
    108
  • Poll closed .
13721 - 13740 of 13903 Posts

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Discussion Starter #13,723
Tesla ? Every car they sell makes a loss. They will be made mincemeat by German EV. Witness new Golf & Porsche EV. Class leaders already first time off the production line.
I don’t see how other car companies will survive in the future. It’s taken so how and so much effort to achieve the range electric cars have today, when Tesla finally reaches the magic figure, say 500 miles range and VW is still on 300 it will be game over for the completion. Other manufacturers may catch up in time but their product will cost more, Tesla being the first will have the best economies of scale. I suspect the car market of the future maybe a monopoly.
 

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I'm on a mission from god to cheer up Remoaners.


Much appreciated... though I would prefer that the elusive and loosely- defined, yet certainly promised, positive impact of Brexit be both real and self-evident! The results will speak for themselves.

It’ll be funny to watch how long the EU continues to be blamed for problems in the UK.

It’s also hilarious that BoJo crossed May’s red line of a border in the Irish Sea.
 

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Living the dream...
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Much appreciated... though I would prefer that the elusive and loosely- defined, yet certainly promised, positive impact of Brexit be both real and self-evident! The results will speak for themselves.

It’ll be funny to watch how long the EU continues to be blamed for problems in the UK.

It’s also hilarious that BoJo crossed May’s red line of a border in the Irish Sea.
Well if we hadn't faffed around for three and a half years with remainer's fighting and screaming and delaying Brexit every inch of the way, with parliament using every trick in the book to delay it's progress, then the positive impact of Brexit may well be 'now' be known.
 

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Sorry folks but both sides of the argument have been sold pups. Short term everyone agrees it will be slightly adverse. Long term it's impossable to compare both scenarios accurately. That's why the whole thing has come to resemble a Celtic/ Rangers match. You've all been sucked into to believing your own team is the best & will WIN today's game.
 

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Well if we hadn't faffed around for three and a half years with remainer's fighting and screaming and delaying Brexit every inch of the way, with parliament using every trick in the book to delay it's progress, then the positive impact of Brexit may well be 'now' be known.
That horrible thing that is a parliament. Luckily there is her majesty.
 

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Well if we hadn't faffed around for three and a half years with remainer's fighting and screaming and delaying Brexit every inch of the way, with parliament using every trick in the book to delay it's progress, then the positive impact of Brexit may well be 'now' be known.
Your daily reminder that had the ERG and DUP voted for the deal last Spring, the UK would have left then as originally intended *

* ultimately there would have been no real change - the date the UK leaves the transition period would still have been 31.12.20. The delays in approving the withdrawal agreement didn't lead to a change in that date. They just reduced the time available for negotiating the trade deal.
 

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Your daily reminder that had the ERG and DUP voted for the deal last Spring, the UK would have left then as originally intended *

* ultimately there would have been no real change - the date the UK leaves the transition period would still have been 31.12.20. The delays in approving the withdrawal agreement didn't lead to a change in that date. They just reduced the time available for negotiating the trade deal.
And for your 'daily reminder' it was Gina Miller and the like that forced the government into giving MP's the vote over triggering Article 50. I wonder how much that cost the country in extending the damaging period of 'uncertainty'. Anyway that is all history now, and now negotiating the trade deal will be a whole different ball game to the withdrawal agreement...
 

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Theresa May announced at conference in 2016 that article 50 would be triggered by the end of Q1 2017. Article 50 was triggered in March 2017, so the Miller case ultimately did nothing to delay it.

As we know, there was no real rush for the government because May then promptly called an election.
 

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Average UK wages rise above pre-financial crisis levels
About 180,000 more people are in work – taking employment level to 32.9 million


https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/feb/18/average-uk-wages-rise-above-pre-financial-crisis-levels

Average wages in Britain have risen above their pre-financial crisis level for the first time as workers begin to repair the damage to their finances after a 12-year squeeze on living standards.

In a significant moment after a lost decade for British workers, the Office for National Statistics said average weekly earnings, excluding bonuses, have reached a fresh peak in real terms. This means pay packets adjusted for inflation are worth more than they were before the 2008 crash – although only just.

An increase of 1.8% took pay excluding bonuses to £474 in the year to December, moving it £1 above the pre-downturn peak of £473 recorded in March 2008, the ONS said.

The annual rate of growth in earnings slowed in December, however, and average pay packets including bonuses are still 3.7% below the pre-financial crisis peak.

Growth in average weekly pay packets, excluding bonuses, dropped to 3.2% in the three months to December, down from 3.4% in November. Growth in total wages, including one-off awards, fell to 2.9% from 3.2% a month earlier.

John Philpott, the director of the Jobs Economist consultancy, said the return to peak wages had come as a result of weaker inflation rather than a boom in pay packets. “Employees can be said only to have limped back to their pre-crisis pay level,” he said.

The number of people in work jumped in the final three months of the year despite heightened political uncertainty over Brexit and the election, with about 180,000 more people starting work – taking the UK’s employment level to 32.9 million.

The unemployment rate remained steady at 3.8%, the lowest level since the mid-1970s, as the number of people out of work fell by about 16,000 to just below 1.3 million.

In a reflection of precarious conditions for a growing proportion of the workforce, the number of people on zero-hours contracts reached a high of 974,000 last year.
 

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And a far cry from the economic meltdown that many doom mongers on here have been predicting for the past three years....
 

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I'm genuinely not sure if that Guardian article is posted here as piece of good news, to boost the morale, or as a bad news and call for change...

Britain just got where we were 12 years ago, which is one of the worse performances among the western economies.

This graphs is from 3 years ago but situation didn't change dramatically since then:
https://www.economist.com/britain/2018/09/06/britains-unemployment-is-ultra-low-but-its-wages-are-ultra-measly


Wage growth was in the last decade was not spectacular, to say the least...
 

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I'm genuinely not sure if that Guardian article is posted here as piece of good news, to boost the morale, or as a bad news and call for change...

Britain just got where we were 12 years ago, which is one of the worse performances among the western economies.

Wage growth was in the last decade was not spectacular, to say the least...
And?

I mean... have you thought what the implications of what you're saying might be?
 

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And nothing. Absolutely nothing. I was just curious if you think that British wage growth since the recession was decent, or maybe too slow.
I agree with you. Wage growth during the last decade of EU membership was too slow. That was the Brexiteer argument too. They said leaving the EU would help improve matters. And here we are today, out of the EU, with wage growth rising above inflation.
 

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I agree with you. Wage growth during the last decade of EU membership was too slow. That was the Brexiteer argument too. They said leaving the EU would help improve matters. And here we are today, out of the EU, with wage growth rising above inflation.
Somehow I thought that might be your interpretation, just wanted to make sure... ;)
 

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Highrise Runner
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I think you need a lot more of wage growth to cope with the increasing prices - as is and as will be. Houses ("increasing prices seen as 'confidence' rather than shortage of stock available - yeah right) and food. Prices on the increase (yep, Brexit!). Government spending - also on the increase, thus government lending - as is and will be - on the increase. Thus, inflation - once more, on the increase, thus wages....

Besides all the marketing and good economic news show, the graph of geogregor shows exactly what "penny less" means. Inflation that kills economic growth and makes people poorer. I guess sometimes you can be on the wrong side of the graph, let's just get emotions in swing and sing all is well and the fault of the EU!
 
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