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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello

I have decided to open this thread considering the fact that there are so many people out there like myself who are considering starting a new life in Canada and are in desperate need of advice, tips, suggestions anything really
which could make the whole process much easier

So please if you have any information, links, phone numbers, forms, in regard to the migration process put them in here :)

Also you are welcome to discuss anything else and get to know those potential new canadian residents :p

that's all from me for now :cheers:
 

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Richmond Hillite
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Ha, funny, because I'm going in the reverse direction. I'm moving back in around 5 years.

But if you choose to come here, welcome :cheers: .
 

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Canadian eh!
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I to have headed in the opposite direction been in Perth since January. I will say this. The immigration process is long heading down to Australia. Took 7 months for me to receive a four year visa. That was with an immigration service handling all the paperwork and a sponsorship from my employer. I would suspect it wouldn't be much quicker heading up the other way.
 

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Banned
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Now someone tell me please
considering that i have finished university only a couple of years ago
and i have about 2 years experience in a full time job
under which program should i apply to migrate to Canada?
Which region is the easier to get in?
and why there is no migration program aimed for Yellowknife considering that they need more people up there?
 

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Salad Days Are Here
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We have migration plans for Fort McMurray - all they need is just some fuckload of housing. Of course, they can't start building up until they get their water treatment plant and a few other infrastructure changes.

We don't encourage movement north because, quite simply, we wouldn't be able to bring ourselves up there. Fort McMurray, Grande Prairie, Prince Rupert are basically the most northern cities where people want to go - and only because of the job opportunities there. There isn't much jobs had up there in Yellowknife, Whitehorse and Inuvik. However, if the Trans-Bering Railway (via tunnel) is built, there would be lots of job openings there. Right now, those cities serve a mostly governmental and national defense role.
 

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Richmond Hillite
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Yes, take a hard look at Fort McMurray. Real nice blokes up there. Alberta is booming and Fort McMurray is exploding. To be quite honest, Alberta probably has the highest living standard in Canada right now and if you want to move away from the beaten path, Fort McMurray is prime for it.
 

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Proud Torontonian
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I think Fort McMurray has the highest per capita income in Canada right now. I think.
 

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Canadian eh!
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As well as a very high cost in everything else.

pallo82 what is your employment field? If you don't mind telling. That will influence where in Canada you should move to. Great opportunities exist in most fields.
 

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Moderator
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I think Fort McMurray has the highest per capita income in Canada right now. I think.
But when you're paying $500,000 for a vinyl siding clad glorified trailer it means nothing. Fort McMurray is swimming in money, but it possibly the ugliest collection of municipal vomit on the planet.

They could build the most beautiful town in the world, but opted for what looks like an Indian reservation with nicer finishes.

Pallo82: You first need to recognize that Canada is a massive country that differs widely. One of the beauties of Canada is that you can find a place that suits almost every taste. The trick is to do your homework. Do you want urban, suburban, rural, or remote? Sophistication or hillbilly? Mountains or plains? Ocean or inland? French or English? Rich or poor? Homogenous or diversity? Booming or stagnant? Old or new? Cultural or sterile? Moderate climate or harsh? Dynamic communities or dull?

Believe it or not, many prefer dull and sterile to dynamic and diverse. They want predictable conservative places to live in. It all depends on who you are and to recognize yourself for who you are.
 

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Salad Days Are Here
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Though, can you blame them? Seriously, the next major route connection is in Edmonton where you have a 2 lane highway and a piddly little railroad there. Of course you're going to expect them to build their houses with what is available.

Of course, that has been my argument in all these boom times. Somethings get to be too scarce to build with.
 

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Registered
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Now someone tell me please
considering that i have finished university only a couple of years ago
and i have about 2 years experience in a full time job
under which program should i apply to migrate to Canada?
Which region is the easier to get in?
and why there is no migration program aimed for Yellowknife considering that they need more people up there?
You should try the skilled worker class immigration unless you have family already living here or have an crud-load of money. Try the self-assessment tool on the CIC website.
 

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Premium Member
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30,816 Posts
I've been thinking of moving to Canada lately, it's been at the back of my mind.

If everything is correct by the time I graduate college in 2010, I would be good enough to pass on their points system as a skilled worker (well actually as I scored a 77). But the whole thing about "Canadian experience" when it comes to jobs is really a big obstacle, I have heard of college graduates driving taxis in Toronto, and I wouldn't want to do that, especially if getting a better job in the US would be the alternative.

I'd like to move to Toronto. I actually lived there for a small time when I was young, and visited the city frequently (last time in 2001, but I'm going there for business in the summer). I love that city.

Anyone know more about this, and can possibly help? Thanks. :eek:kay:
 

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But the whole thing about "Canadian experience" when it comes to jobs is really a big obstacle, I have heard of college graduates driving taxis in Toronto, and I wouldn't want to do that, especially if getting a better job in the US would be the alternative.
Well, I know a number of university graduates who are "underemployed", if that's what you mean. The same is true in the States, though. How many English (or architecture ;) ) majors does the world need?

You'd better do some research about whether your degree/qualification is transferable before you decide to come here. I'm not an expert, but I'd imagine American qualifications would be as transferable as they get, as far as these things go.

You often hear stories about immigrants working in factories, driving taxis etc., because their medical/engineering/whatever degree from "insert country here" is non transferable or requires a lot of training to meet our standards.
 

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Yes, take a hard look at Fort McMurray. Real nice blokes up there. Alberta is booming and Fort McMurray is exploding. To be quite honest, Alberta probably has the highest living standard in Canada right now and if you want to move away from the beaten path, Fort McMurray is prime for it.
Alberta does not have the highest standard of living in Canada... the economy is incredible but it's moving too fast. There are very serious housing shortages; forget the fact that it's becomeing unaffordable, but there are people who are employed who simply can't find a place to live. It's bad enough that some people are living in Provincial Parks near Fort McMurray through the winter. That's insanity. Another symptom of Albertas success is that fewer people are working in the social services, such as day care. Alot of families can't cope.

Having said that, there is certainly huge potential in Alberta, and it would be a smart move for someone migrating here. Calgary and Edmonton are nice enough cities (I personaly like Edmonton better, but that's just me).

You could also consider the Maritime provinces. There's a reverse-exodus situation there where so many young people have moved out to Alberta, that companies are having trouble finding people to work. It's also where you'll probably find the best value for living cost.

Ontario is where you'll find the most diverse economy, and the largest variety of urban experience. You have Toronto, which as you know is the largest city here. It's relatively safe, exciting, multicultural and is growing at a very fast rate. Ottawa is a smaller city, but very beautiful and clean. Hamilton is gritty, but is the cheapest large city in Canada, and is an easy commute to Toronto. There are other smaller cities throughout the Province that have excellent economic momentum (Kitchener/Waterloo, Guelph, London, etc).

British Columbia is arguably the most beautiful province in Canada, and if you enjoy outdoor water or alpine activities, it's literally paradise. Vancouver is incredible. However, outisde Vancouver and Victoria, there isn't much happening.

Don't forget Quebec... of Canada's big three cities, Montreal is inexpensive, and as such it retains a very youthful and artisitic vigour. Basic French will help for getting around. Fluent French would be required for working though.

Depending on what field you are in, there are many small cities throughout the country that are very nice... Winnipeg, Regina, Halifax, Saskatoon.. mostly underatted, forgotten, but all great places to live.

Since you are so enamoured with the North, I'd suggest Edmonton. First, you'll get a job no problem. Second, you can see if you're really cut out for a northern climate. Third, once you're settled, you're a flight or a long road trip away from the Northwest Territories.

Hope that helps.
 

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Banned
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
But when you're paying $500,000 for a vinyl siding clad glorified trailer it means nothing. Fort McMurray is swimming in money, but it possibly the ugliest collection of municipal vomit on the planet.

They could build the most beautiful town in the world, but opted for what looks like an Indian reservation with nicer finishes.

Pallo82: You first need to recognize that Canada is a massive country that differs widely. One of the beauties of Canada is that you can find a place that suits almost every taste. The trick is to do your homework. Do you want urban, suburban, rural, or remote? Sophistication or hillbilly? Mountains or plains? Ocean or inland? French or English? Rich or poor? Homogenous or diversity? Booming or stagnant? Old or new? Cultural or sterile? Moderate climate or harsh? Dynamic communities or dull?

Believe it or not, many prefer dull and sterile to dynamic and diverse. They want predictable conservative places to live in. It all depends on who you are and to recognize yourself for who you are.

Hey i am back , sorry was in the brig for a few days :lol:
Anyway thanks for your response. I Know Canada quite well and i know how diverse it can be. All right so first i'd like to live somewhere where it's very very cold in winter so I guess my major options would be Winnipeg or Yellowknife, but on the other hand i wouldnt mind living in Vancouver as it doesnt get very hot in summer. I certainly dont want to live with hillbillies lol so i guess Alberta is out of the question , can you suggest a few sophisticated cities in Canada? I like mountains , i dont mind English or French, reasonably rich would be nice however low cost of life is more important to me. i like new architecture, not very fond of very old buildings and styles. I definitely want a cultural city with lots of film festivals, etc. Harsh climate as i said before :) I don't care about the community as i am more of a homebody person so i dont go out a lot apart from some outings with friends

So what do you suggest ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
which field are you in? Some cities have strength which could fit in your profile.
Well well... let's start with the studies i have done
- i have completed a bachelor of arts (with major in Italian and Modern Hebrew) at the University of Melbourne
- After my first degree i completed a Graduate Diploma of Education with methodology in Italian and ESL (which is your equivalent of teacher training college)
- I have completed a cabin crew course , i have first aid certificate, responsible service of alcohol, and that s about it i think

Despite my studies in the fields previously mentioned right now i work as a consultant in the tourism industry and i think that's the career path i want to follow, but said that if i got accepted into Canada i would take ANY JOB so if anyone has a job to offer me feel free to msg me :p

In the long run the sort of jobs i would consider within the tourism industry are:
- travel service consultant (i d love working in a travel agency!)
- Airport check in (where they check your tickets and weight your luggage)
- Passport control officer
- Fligh attendant
- Working for an airline
 

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Salad Days Are Here
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Winnipeg and Edmonton are good bets. Edmonton and Calgary are not really full of hicks. Yellowknife, Grande Prairie are smaller cities which have their own flavour. Churchill has a nice little tourism industry there - frolick with the polar bears and the sort.
 

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Premium Member
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Well, I know a number of university graduates who are "underemployed", if that's what you mean. The same is true in the States, though. How many English (or architecture ;) ) majors does the world need?

You'd better do some research about whether your degree/qualification is transferable before you decide to come here. I'm not an expert, but I'd imagine American qualifications would be as transferable as they get, as far as these things go.

You often hear stories about immigrants working in factories, driving taxis etc., because their medical/engineering/whatever degree from "insert country here" is non transferable or requires a lot of training to meet our standards.
Thanks! :D
 
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