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Could the canal's of Manchester ever be used as a tourist attraction like they are in Venice? Obviously not to the extent that they are in venice as there is alot of them, but do we have a few routes in the City Centre?
 

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Probably too many locks and possibly too industrial. They don't really go anywere but out towards industrial towns.

Venice's aren't really canals, they haven't been dug they just seperate a load of man made islands in the lagoon.
 

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Well, you could have trips between Worsley (and places like Dunham) and Castlefield as that's a lockless stretch. Building small networks of canals along certain stretches is something that came to mind for me, you could have canals down Bloom street and Richmond street but that would probably be a little gimmicky and impractical.
 
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I've always thought the Bridgewater Canal could be the mainstay of the future of Manchester's tourism industry. like our own tourist route. It does connect central Manchester with Old Trafford, The Trafford Centre, (future WHS) Worsley, and the prettiness of Cheshire. Granted it does need a bit of work. But it can be surprisingly picturesque in the places you mention. It's a shame it doesn't connect directly with this:



Maybe some 21st century canal technology could make the journey less painful.
 

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lol, yeh, Manchester has a lot of things like that.
 

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wiggledypiggleypuddinghed
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i do agree that the canal areas arent promoted enough.. theres some lovely walks etc, that are a nice restbite from the bustle of the main city centre
 

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The cancals in Manchester run behind all the decent buildings and are well below street level. You would have a lovely view of industrial bins.
 

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Manchester has a far better asset in the River Irwell, navigable from the Cathedral to the sea and navigable by 15,000 ton ships from Mode Wheel Locks.
 

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Manchester has a far better asset in the River Irwell, navigable from the Cathedral to the sea and navigable by 15,000 ton ships from Mode Wheel Locks.
Locks! big ones too.
 

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10th February 2008
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Martin Zero

In this video we are in Castlefield in Manchester. We are exploring the history of Canals, warehouses and underground tunnels from the 18th century. What we see is a wonderful example of British industrial history from the 18th century. The start of the industrial revolution . Very much Georgian Britain. This is Episode XI of the River Medlock journey. We have finally entered Castlefield and we see the work of James Brindley Francis Egerton and his engineer John Gilbert the force behind the Bridgewater Canal. Britains first Industrial canal. This journey started out with us Kayaking along the Bridgewater canal and ended up an urbex in an underground tunnel in Manchester. We see the remains of a waterwheel chamber that powered lifting gear for the Grocers warehouse one of the first 18th century warehouses. We also look at Brindley's now altered weir, the flood defence mechanism for Castlefield basin.

 

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Martin Zero

In this video we are in Castlefield in Manchester. We are exploring the history of Canals, warehouses and underground tunnels from the 18th century. What we see is a wonderful example of British industrial history from the 18th century. The start of the industrial revolution . Very much Georgian Britain. This is Episode XI of the River Medlock journey. We have finally entered Castlefield and we see the work of James Brindley Francis Egerton and his engineer John Gilbert the force behind the Bridgewater Canal. Britains first Industrial canal. This journey started out with us Kayaking along the Bridgewater canal and ended up an urbex in an underground tunnel in Manchester. We see the remains of a waterwheel chamber that powered lifting gear for the Grocers warehouse one of the first 18th century warehouses. We also look at Brindley's now altered weir, the flood defence mechanism for Castlefield basin.

He's great Martin. I hope one of the TV networks picks up his ideas and gets it in a larger platform.
 
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