SkyscraperCity banner

141 - 160 of 1179 Posts

·
i've changed my mind
Joined
·
3,836 Posts
RIP.

I heard he lept to his death from the 22nd floor of the Swiss Hotel (above Myer) in Sydney's CBD.
lol @ someone making facebook tribute group... then posting ->

------------------- "FLY" by Celine Dion -------------------

Fly, fly little wing
Fly beyond imagining
The softest cloud, the whitest dove
Upon the wind of heaven's love
Past the planets and the stars
Leave this lonely world of ours
Escape the sorrow and the pain
And fly again

Fly, fly precious one
Your endless journey has begun
Take your gentle happiness
Far too beautiful for this
Cross over to the other shore
There is peace forevermore
But hold this memory bittersweet
Until we meet...

Fly, fly do not fear
Don't waste a breath, don't shed a tear
Your heart is pure, your soul is free
Be on your way, don't wait for me
Above the universe you'll climb
On beyond the hands of time
The moon will rise, the sun will set
But I won't forget

Fly, fly little wing
Fly where only angels sing
Fly away, the time is right
Go now, find the light.

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=24540477598&ref=nf
 

·
Total Jibberish
Joined
·
47 Posts
R.I.P Richard Wright

Richard Wright, founder member of Pink Floyd died today after a short struggle with cancer.

Wright co-wrote five songs on "Dark Side of the Moon," which was released in 1973, spent 14 years on the Billboard 200 album chart and is one of the best selling albums ever.

Wright left Pink Floyd after falling out with Waters during sessions for "The Wall." He rejoined the band in 1987.

Sad day - looks like i will be listening to DSOTM tonight over a couple of ales!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75,850 Posts
Discussion Starter · #145 ·
Cathy Freemans brother was killed last night in car smash. rip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
539 Posts
Richard Wright, founder member of Pink Floyd died today after a short struggle with cancer.

Wright co-wrote five songs on "Dark Side of the Moon," which was released in 1973, spent 14 years on the Billboard 200 album chart and is one of the best selling albums ever.

Wright left Pink Floyd after falling out with Waters during sessions for "The Wall." He rejoined the band in 1987.

Sad day - looks like i will be listening to DSOTM tonight over a couple of ales!
Poor old Rick. :( That was quick - I only heard he had cancer the other day. DSOTM is a brilliant album. Anyone involved in it deserves massive respect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75,850 Posts
Discussion Starter · #147 ·
legends dont come any bigger
Paul newman has died of cancer aged 83
what a brilliant career.
loved him in cool hand luke
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75,850 Posts
Discussion Starter · #150 ·
he was great in towering inferno. him and steve mcqueen were first actors to get 1mil for a movie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,657 Posts
Oh yeah. The Towering Inferno! I was about 6 years old when that came out and I was fascinated :)



What about ''The Sting''? A masterpiece Newman - Redford team up
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75,850 Posts
Discussion Starter · #152 ·
the phantom, Rob Guest died overnight from a stroke aged 57. great actor. rip

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75,850 Posts
Discussion Starter · #153 ·
mowtown legend-lead singer of 4 tops dies aged 72.
Levi stubbs

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75,850 Posts
Discussion Starter · #154 ·
awesome writer
author micheal crichton dies from cancer age66



'Jurassic Park' author Michael Crichton dies at 66
By HILLEL ITALIE – 1 day ago

Michael Crichton, the million-selling author who made scientific research terrifying and irresistible in such thrillers as "Jurassic Park," "Timeline" and "The Andromeda Strain," has died of cancer, his family said. Crichton died Tuesday in Los Angeles at age 66 after privately battling cancer.

"Through his books, Michael Crichton served as an inspiration to students of all ages, challenged scientists in many fields, and illuminated the mysteries of the world in a way we could all understand," his family said in a statement.

"While the world knew him as a great storyteller that challenged our preconceived notions about the world around us — and entertained us all while doing so — his wife Sherri, daughter Taylor, family and friends knew Michael Crichton as a devoted husband, loving father and generous friend who inspired each of us to strive to see the wonders of our world through new eyes."

He was an experimenter and popularizer known for his stories of disaster and systematic breakdown, such as the rampant microbe of "The Andromeda Strain" or the dinosaurs running madly in "Jurassic Park." Many of his books became major Hollywood movies, including "Jurassic Park," "Rising Sun" and "Disclosure." Crichton himself directed and wrote "The Great Train Robbery" and he co-wrote the script for the blockbuster "Twister."

In 1994, he created the award-winning TV hospital series "ER." He's even had a dinosaur named for him, Crichton's ankylosaur.

"Michael's talent out-scaled even his own dinosaurs of `Jurassic Park,'" said "Jurassic Park" director Steven Spielberg, a friend of Crichton's for 40 years. "He was the greatest at blending science with big theatrical concepts, which is what gave credibility to dinosaurs again walking the Earth. ... Michael was a gentle soul who reserved his flamboyant side for his novels. There is no one in the wings that will ever take his place."

John Wells, executive producer of "ER" called the author "an extraordinary man. Brilliant, funny, erudite, gracious, exceptionally inquisitive and always thoughtful.

"No lunch with Michael lasted less than three hours and no subject was too prosaic or obscure to attract his interest. Sexual politics, medical and scientific ethics, anthropology, archaeology, economics, astronomy, astrology, quantum physics, and molecular biology were all regular topics of conversation."

In recent years, he was the rare novelist granted a White House meeting with President Bush, perhaps because of his skepticism about global warming, which Crichton addressed in the 2004 novel, "State of Fear." Crichton's views were strongly condemned by environmentalists, who alleged that the author was hurting efforts to pass legislation to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide.

If not a literary giant, he was a physical one, standing 6 feet and 9 inches, and ready for battle with the press. In a 2004 interview with The Associated Press, Crichton came with a tape recorder, text books and a pile of graphs and charts as he defended "State of Fear" and his take on global warming.

"I have a lot of trouble with things that don't seem true to me," Crichton said at the time, his large, manicured hands gesturing to his graphs. "I'm very uncomfortable just accepting. There's something in me that wants to pound the table and say, 'That's not true.'"

He spoke to few scientists about his questions, convinced that he could interpret the data himself. "If we put everything in the hands of experts and if we say that as intelligent outsiders, we are not qualified to look over the shoulder of anybody, then we're in some kind of really weird world," he said.

A new novel by Crichton had been tentatively scheduled to come next month, but publisher HarperCollins said the book was postponed indefinitely because of his illness.

One of four siblings, Crichton was born in Chicago and grew up in Roslyn, Long Island. His father was a journalist and young Michael spent much of his childhood writing extra papers for teachers. In third grade, he wrote a nine-page play that his father typed for him using carbon paper so the other kids would know their parts. He was tall, gangly and awkward, and used writing as a way to escape; Mark Twain and Alfred Hitchcock were his role models.

Figuring he would not be able to make a living as writer, and not good enough at basketball, he decided to become a doctor. He studied anthropology at Harvard College, and later graduated from Harvard Medical School. During medical school, he turned out books under pseudonyms. (One that the tall author used was Jeffrey Hudson, a 17th-century dwarf in the court of King Charles II of England.) He had modest success with his writing and decided to pursue it.

His first hit, "The Andromeda Strain," was written while he was still in medical school and quickly caught on upon its 1969 release. It was a featured selection of the Book-of-the-Month Club and was sold to Universal in Hollywood for $250,000.

"A few of the teachers feel I'm wasting my time, and that in some ways I have wasted theirs," he told The New York Times in 1969. "When I asked for a couple of days off to go to California about a movie sale, that raised an eyebrow."

His books seemed designed to provoke debate, whether the theories of quantum physics in "Timeline," the reverse sexual discrimination of "Disclosure" or the spectre of Japanese eminence in "Rising Sun."

"The initial response from the (Japanese) establishment was, 'You're a racist,'" he told the AP. "So then, because I'm always trying to deal with data, I went on a tour talking about it and gave a very careful argument, and their response came back, 'Well you say that but we know you're a racist.'"

Crichton had a rigid work schedule: rising before dawn and writing from about 6 a.m. to around 3 p.m., breaking only for lunch. He enjoyed being one of the few novelists recognized in public, but he also felt limited by fame.

"Of course, the celebrity is nice. But when I go do research, it's much more difficult now. The kind of freedom I had 10 years ago is gone," he told the AP. "You have to have good table manners; you can't have spaghetti hanging out of your mouth at a restaurant."

Crichton was married five times and had one child. A private funeral is planned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75,850 Posts
Discussion Starter · #156 ·


Jorn Utzon, the Danish architect whose nautically inspired design for the Sydney Opera House in Australia overcame a series of controversies surrounding its budget and acoustics to become one of the most recognizable landmarks of the 20th century, helping to usher in our current era of buildings beloved for their daring and photogenic forms, has died. He was 90.

The cause was a heart attack that struck early Saturday morning while Utzon was asleep at his home in Copenhagen, Denmark, his son, Kim Utzon, told The Associated Press.

Few architects have been as closely associated with a single building as Utzon was with the 1973 opera house, which emerges - part sailboat, part sea creature - from a site on the edge of Sydney Harbor.

In 1957, when he was 38, he won the international competition for the project. His design for a cluster of five auditoriums tucked beneath a roof of billowing white concrete shells impressed a jury that included architect Eero Saarinen.



In 1959, Joe Cahill, who as premier of New South Wales had been an early champion of Utzon's design, died, and in the years that followed controversy swirled around the proposed building. Utzon was criticized so heavily for cost overruns and delays he resigned from the job and left Australia in 1966, seven years before the opera house was completed. Government-appointed architects finished the interior, making drastic changes to the layout. Utzon never saw the final product in person and never returned to Australia.

In 2003, he won the Pritzker Prize, architecture's top honor. The award was widely seen as belated recognition for the innovative Sydney design.

Utzon is survived by his wife, sons Jan and Kim and daughter Lin, and several grandchildren. His two sons are architects.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,428 Posts
Just two years ago she won the marathon at the Commonwealth Games, now shes dead from cancer, leaving behind three young kids. So sad :eek:hno:

Marathon runner McCann dies

Dual Commonwealth Games marathon gold medallist Kerryn McCann has died from cancer.
McCann was first diagnosed with breast cancer in August last year while she was pregnant with her third child. She finished a course of chemotherapy in January this year but was then diagnosed with a secondary cancer in her liver. McCann passed away at her home near Wollongong on the New South Wales south coast overnight, surrounded by her family. She was 41. She is survived by her husband Greg and their children Benton (11), Josie (5) and Cooper (14 months).

McCann won Commonwealth gold medals in the marathon at Melbourne in 2006 and Manchester in 2002. "On behalf of the entire athletics community, I would like to pass on my sincere condolences to the McCann family," Athletics Australia President Rob Fildes said in a statement. "Kerryn will fondly be remembered for being an extremely popular team member who represented her country on 14 occasions, across an athletics career that spanned 22 years."

Olympic great and breast cancer survivor Raelene Boyle said McCann was very courageous during her illness. "Kerryn was a very strong person, very quiet, private, good mother, loving wife, a really nice, ordinary person who had an extraordinary talent to be able to, in my mind, stupidly, run marathons," she said. "I mean if you had the choice you'd runs sprints wouldn't you, but she had this extraordinary talent and we'll never forget her."

Boyle said McCann did not let her illness depress her. "One of the good things that Kerryn did, was she knew she was in real trouble right from the start, she knew it, but she got on with her life," Boyle said. "She wanted to do it privately and she and Greg coped very well and they did the hard yards and the sad times together and they didn't really want to go into a public form of grief."

Former fellow marathon runner and coach Pat Carroll knew McCann for many years. "To think that it's only two years ago [that she won in Melbourne]," he said. "I mean we think about sport heroes as being immortal and you don't think that such a short time after achieving such a great feat only two years ago, that something so tragic would happen to someone like Kerryn. Distance running is an incredibly tough sport with the training you do. You're out there in the marathon for over two hours or two-and-a-half hours. You do do a lot of soul-searching and you've really got to reach within, and no doubt she tried her hardest to beat this illness. But I can assure you that the main reason she would have been trying to beat it is to be with her children. She was an extremely loving mother and I think that one thing I will always remember her for is the love she shared for her family."

McCann provided one of the most memorable moments of the Melbourne Games, duelling with Kenyan Hellen Cherono in the last three kilometres as they approached the MCG. McCann was lifted by a roaring capacity home crowd in the stadium and pulled away over the closing 300m to defend the title she claimed in Manchester. "I think Kerryn herself said she had decided that silver would be fine for her and they were running across the bridge and about to come into the MCG and she thought `no, I can win this'," Boyle said. "She won it by just metres after running 42 kilometres - a very brave woman."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75,850 Posts
Discussion Starter · #158 ·
news not good. Liam Neesons wife natasha Richardson is on life support due to injuries from ski accident.

Richardson on life support:


Award winning actress Natasha Richardson is on life support after suffering head injuries from a skiing accident in Canada.

Reports from the US say the actress is being flown home to New York where she resides with actor husband Liam Neeson, where it is expected her life support will be turned off after family and friends get their chance to say goodbye.

Richardson is best known for her role in the Broadway play Cabaret, for which she won a Tony Award.

She has also appeared in several Hollywood films including Evening, with Toni Collette and Meryl Streep, Maid in Manhattan with Ralph Fiennes and Jennifer Lopez, and Nell, where she met Neeson.

She is also the daughter of screen legend Vanessa Redgrave and the sister of actress Joely Richardson, who appears in the television drama Nip/Tuck.
 
141 - 160 of 1179 Posts
Top