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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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55,632 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The High Line then and now

What today is one of New York's more interesting parks and public spaces was once a lowly elevated freight rail line bringing goods into and out of Manhattan from the tunnels and wharves along the Hudson River. Later, as factories and warehouses slowly vacated the area in Chelsea, the High Line fell to disuse and abandonment. Or did it? Beside the graffiti artists and bums drawn to the fresh palette of an entire rusting infrastructure, there were intrepid and curious explorers who climbed the elevated to enjoy views and spaces unseen or cared about by most New Yorkers. So many in fact that the High Line has been resurrected as a major new urban park and experience. New lofts, condos and hotels have replaced the vacated commercial buildings and the High Line is now chic. This thread celebrates the story of the High Line.


Locomotive on the High Line by syscosteve, on Flickr


High Line Views, New York City - 06 by Vivienne Gucwa, on Flickr
 

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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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55,632 Posts
Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
"Death Avenue"


http://theboweryboys.blogspot.com/2011_06_01_archive.html


Death Avenue by syscosteve, on Flickr


West Side Cowboy by syscosteve, on Flickr

During the 1840s, the city of New York mistakenly allowed the building of train tracks along Manhattan's West Side. Soon after, trains and street-level vehicles collided in frequent accidents, leading the Eleventh Avenue freight line to be nicknamed "Death Avenue." To provide more safety, the West Side Cowboys were formed, a contingent of several men on horseback who rode ahead of the trains to signal their arrival. In the 1930s a large project to reconfigure the West Side included the relocation of the dangerous tracks to an elevated High Line. Furthermore, the trains could move through factories and warehouses, delivering and picking up supplies. The trains hummed along until they faced competition with interstate trucks, and the southernmost section was torn up in the 1960s. The last train moved through in 1980. (syscosteve)
 

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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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55,632 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Building the High Line 1932

The High Line was built between the years of 1929 and 1934, as part of a massive public-private infrastructure project called the West Side Improvement.
(Friends of the High Line)


Building the High Line by syscosteve, on Flickr


Building the High Line by syscosteve, on Flickr


Building the High Line by syscosteve, on Flickr


Building the Hiline ca 1932 by syscosteve, on Flickr


Building the High Line by syscosteve, on Flickr


Building the High Line 8 by syscosteve, on Flickr



 

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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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55,632 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
The High Line opens



The ceremonial first electric locomotive pulls into St. John's Terminal 1934



West Side Rail Yards by syscosteve, on Flickr

The West Side Railyards



High Line at 14th Street2 by syscosteve, on Flickr

The High Line at 14th St.



Gansevoort Street by syscosteve, on Flickr

Gansevoort St.



Hi-line National Biscuit Company by syscosteve, on Flickr

Nabisco at the High Line



Merchants Refrigerating Company Warehouse by syscosteve, on Flickr

Merchants refrigerating Warehouse



Bell Telephone Laboratoriesb by syscosteve, on Flickr

Bell Telephone Laboratories



St. John's Park Terminal ca @1937 by syscosteve, on Flickr

St. John's Park Terminal

The High Line's original terminus was St. John's Park Terminal on Clarkson Street. The southernmost portion, from Clarkson to Gansevoort Streets, was demolished by the City in portions in the 1960s, and 1990s.
(Friends of the High Line)

More terrific photos can be seen here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/friendsofthehighline/ :)
 

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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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55,632 Posts
Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)

airael view north of 17th st by syscosteve, on Flickr

The High Line hummed with freight commerce for the first 20 years after it opened in 1934, doing the job of moving goods from the wharves to factories, warehouses and meat purveyors on the west side of Manhattan. But as the harbor saw traffic decline after World War 2, the line began to decline with it. Piers closed, traffic dropped and factories began to disappear. Bell Labs moved to Northen New Jersey and others followed them out to areas west of the Hudson with better rail and port access to the rest of the US. In their wake, the High Line became disused and partial demolition of the elevated structured began in the 1960s. With recession and New York's poor finances in the 1970s, maintenance and upkeep of the structure vanished and it's last user held out until 1980 before the entire line was basically abandoned. The last train on the High Line carried a load of frozen turkeys.

The line sank into a long period of decay and was largely forgotten.




 

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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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55,632 Posts
Discussion Starter #16

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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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55,632 Posts
Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)

High Line by bitpuddle, on Flickr

Friends of the High Line, a community-based non-profit group, formed in 1999 when the historic structure was under threat of demolition. Friends of the High Line works in partnership with the City of New York to preserve and maintain the structure as an elevated public park.

The project gained the City's support in 2002. The High Line south of 30th Street was donated to the City by CSX Transportation Inc. in 2005. The design team of landscape architects James Corner Field Operations, with architects Diller Scofidio + Renfro, created the High Line's public landscape with guidance from a diverse community of High Line supporters. Construction on the park began in 2006. The first section, from Gansevoort Street to 20th Street, opened in June 2009.



Some shots of the High Line first phase construction from 2006-2009


High Line Construction 3/10/2006 Picture 2 by msid1967, on Flickr


Tour of the High Line by NYCviaRachel, on Flickr


Tour of the High Line by NYCviaRachel, on Flickr


Tour of the High Line by NYCviaRachel, on Flickr


Tour of the High Line by NYCviaRachel, on Flickr


Tour of the High Line by NYCviaRachel, on Flickr


Tour of the High Line by NYCviaRachel, on Flickr


Tour of the High Line by NYCviaRachel, on Flickr


feb-construction-1.jpg by curbed, on Flickr


Sky high line by TrespassersWill, on Flickr


Sky high line by TrespassersWill, on Flickr


On the High Line by Jordan Perr, on Flickr


Construction Maze by Jordan Perr, on Flickr


09 May _ High Line Construction Tour by Q's wandering..., on Flickr


09 May _ High Line Construction Tour by Q's wandering..., on Flickr


09 May _ High Line Construction Tour by Q's wandering..., on Flickr


09 May _ High Line Construction Tour by Q's wandering..., on Flickr


09 May _ High Line Construction Tour by Q's wandering..., on Flickr


High Line Park, Under construction by Ed Gaillard, on Flickr


NYC - The High Line: Attention, Water Feature Under Construction by christiNYCa, on Flickr


The High Line Building under construction by Andrew St. Clair, on Flickr


Rails in High Line Park by Andrew St. Clair, on Flickr
 

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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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55,632 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Curbed

Phase II of the High Line Will Open Next Wednesday
Tuesday, May 31, 2011, by Sara Polsky



Without further ado: the long-awaited Section 2 of the High Line has an official opening date, and that date, according to the latest Friends of the High Line e-mail blast, is Wednesday, June 8. For those without a calendar in reach, that's a week from tomorrow! Excuse us while we go press the exclamation mark key a few more times. We've already gotten sneak peeks at a few of the new phase's features, including the 30th Street Cut-Out, the seating steps, and the Lawn at 23rd Street. Then there are the old renderings of the rest, which we suppose can tide us over a few more days.
 
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