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Looking at the beams on the ceiling, it looks like they actually were (the) structural (core) columns.
My mistake, looks like you were right. On floors that Marsh McLennan occupied, the core columns were usually hidden behind walls, so I'd never seen them out in the open like this.

 

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Skylobby concept, circa 1967, showing proposed uses for skylobby at floors 44, 78. In the end, the 78th floor skylobby became office space, while the 44th floor skylobby in the North Tower was occupied by the Port Authority's employee cafeteria/lounge.

 

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I posted these on here a few years ago but I figured I would do it again. They are panoramic pictures of Cantor Fitzgerald's WTC offices at the top of the North Tower.

http://timhawkings.com/gallery.php5?category=4&album=1&page=1&photo=Lobby.mov

If anyone has any interior pictures that haven't been posted on here, PLEASE post them. I am very interested in seeing more pictures of offices.
I have those saved to my hard drive. Certainly unique.

I have a folder with over 1000 interior shots. Most are on my photobucket, and have probably been posted here already. Plus I think some are duplicates, so probably more like 800 or something.
 

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I have those saved to my hard drive. Certainly unique.

I have a folder with over 1000 interior shots. Most are on my photobucket, and have probably been posted here already. Plus I think some are duplicates, so probably more like 800 or something.


I've looked through a lot of your folder and it is indeed a wonderful collection of photos. Thanks for putting all of that together.

Regarding those Cantor Fitzgerald panoramic pictures: I'm about 95% certain that the second photo is a picture of the equities trading floor on the southwest corner of the 104th floor. It's clearly the SW corner because you can see the South Tower in the windows. There are certain things in the photo that make me think it's the 104th floor equities area.

If that picture is indeed from the 104th floor then it's a picture of the area where the very intense fire was burning on 9/11 after the South Tower collapse. It's easy to see why that fire was intense when you look at that panoramic. There are a ton of chairs, computers, desks, etc that would be very combustible.
 

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I've looked through a lot of your folder and it is indeed a wonderful collection of photos. Thanks for putting all of that together.

Regarding those Cantor Fitzgerald panoramic pictures: I'm about 95% certain that the second photo is a picture of the equities trading floor on the southwest corner of the 104th floor. It's clearly the SW corner because you can see the South Tower in the windows. There are certain things in the photo that make me think it's the 104th floor equities area.

If that picture is indeed from the 104th floor then it's a picture of the area where the very intense fire was burning on 9/11 after the South Tower collapse. It's easy to see why that fire was intense when you look at that panoramic. There are a ton of chairs, computers, desks, etc that would be very combustible.
CF was upstairs from us, and they shared some infrastructure with Marsh McLennan. (mostly data/telephone cabling that ran through vertical shafts in the core of the tower)

Having been in Cantor's offices prior to 9/11, I can confirm that the images in the panorama are indeed the Equities Trading Floor on the 104th floor. I've seen this pano before, truly eerie.
 

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CF was upstairs from us, and they shared some infrastructure with Marsh McLennan. (mostly data/telephone cabling that ran through vertical shafts in the core of the tower)

Having been in Cantor's offices prior to 9/11, I can confirm that the images in the panorama are indeed the Equities Trading Floor on the 104th floor. I've seen this pano before, truly eerie.


Thanks for confirming that. And also, thanks for sharing your personal knowledge of the buildings which is probably unparalleled on this forum. I really appreciate the insight you've been giving recently.

Did you ever walk around Cantor's lavish lobby area with the Rodin sculptures that appear in photo 6? Would that 6th pic with the Rodin sculpture have been taken on the 105th floor near the executive offices?

I've always read that Cantor had some of swankest offices in the WTC. I have the book "On Top of the World" which details how the company came back after 9/11. The book has several pictures of their WTC offices which looked pretty snazzy.

Another company that had beautiful looking offices was Keefe Bruyette Woods on the 88th/89th floor of 2 WTC. Their offices had recently been completely renovated before 9/11.
 

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Thanks for confirming that. And also, thanks for sharing your personal knowledge of the buildings which is probably unparalleled on this forum. I really appreciate the insight you've been giving recently.

Did you ever walk around Cantor's lavish lobby area with the Rodin sculptures that appear in photo 6? Would that 6th pic with the Rodin sculpture have been taken on the 105th floor near the executive offices?

I've always read that Cantor had some of swankest offices in the WTC. I have the book "On Top of the World" which details how the company came back after 9/11. The book has several pictures of their WTC offices which looked pretty snazzy.

Another company that had beautiful looking offices was Keefe Bruyette Woods on the 88th/89th floor of 2 WTC. Their offices had recently been completely renovated before 9/11.
Yes, the lobby shown in the panos is outside the exec area on the 105th floor. I want to say it was on the north side of the tower, but it's been ten years since I was in those buildings so I don't really remember.

Cantor's offices were truly upscale compared to MMC. They had better computers, better printers, better coffee, free donuts, nicer furniture, and dry-cleaning service. Think of it this way, if Cantor's offices were like being on the Titanic, then MMCs offices were like being on an aircraft carrier; dull, drab, and spartan. Then again, it was just an office so most people didn't really care.

As you can tell from the pano, Cantor adopted an open-office plan for their WTC offices (at least on the trading floors) so their offices felt more lively and energetic. Marsh was mostly a bullpen full of cubicles and walled-off offices, so you didn't get to know the people that worked next to you too well. But I suppose that's true in any office full of cubicles.

I never did get to see Keefe's offices in the South Tower, although I (and several other MMC IT personnel) did meet with several members of the Aon Corporation on the 105th floor of the South Tower in August 2000. We did business with Aon and were trying to get them to allow us access to their servers so we could set up transaction processing so their systems could interface with our proprietary (crap) software. Their offices were well appointed too.

Here are some photos from someone who apparently worked for Aon in the South Tower on the 101st floor.

http://davidbardes.com/wtc/welcome.html



According to the caption, the man facing the camera survived, while the man with his back towards the camera did not.



This man was not at work that day.



Anytime I felt stressed at work, or pissed off, or just having a shitty day in general, I did this; walked up to a window and peered down. And remembered that I had it pretty damn good. If you can recall the dot com boom, well in mid/late 2000 it had stagnated and several of my friends had lost their jobs as web/software developers. Despite the fact that I hated my job (well, sometimes.), I was 23 years old, working for one of the biggest companies in New York, had my own place in Park Slope (before the hipsters moved in and ruined it), an attractive girlfriend (now my wife), I really had it better off than most people and had no reason to complain.

And it was all ripped away from me a year later.
 

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One more. I don't remember where I got this picture from, but it's been my wallpaper as long as I can remember. This was taken in November 2000.

 

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On this day, 41 years ago, December 23, 1970, the North Tower is topped out at 1,368 feet, making it the tallest building in the world.

 

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Beautiful image....I am new to this thread and have just skimmed through these pages of images and discussion. It is really incredible to see the work that went in to this online memorialization of the WTC

Now, how are you guys feeling about what is to come?


 

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Meh. I wish they'd built it above ground. That's all I'm going to say about that.

By the way, that second rendering is outdated. I'm so glad they didn't build the Libeskind master plan with shorter towers and the 60-story-tower-masquerading-as-a-supertall "Freedom" Tower, would have been a blight on the skyline. At least the current plan restores the skyline in a form resembling the Twin Towers (see below):

This is one of STR's renderings, thanks STR in advance.

 

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Yes, the lobby shown in the panos is outside the exec area on the 105th floor. I want to say it was on the north side of the tower, but it's been ten years since I was in those buildings so I don't really remember.

Cantor's offices were truly upscale compared to MMC. They had better computers, better printers, better coffee, free donuts, nicer furniture, and dry-cleaning service. Think of it this way, if Cantor's offices were like being on the Titanic, then MMCs offices were like being on an aircraft carrier; dull, drab, and spartan. Then again, it was just an office so most people didn't really care.

As you can tell from the pano, Cantor adopted an open-office plan for their WTC offices (at least on the trading floors) so their offices felt more lively and energetic. Marsh was mostly a bullpen full of cubicles and walled-off offices, so you didn't get to know the people that worked next to you too well. But I suppose that's true in any office full of cubicles.

I never did get to see Keefe's offices in the South Tower, although I (and several other MMC IT personnel) did meet with several members of the Aon Corporation on the 105th floor of the South Tower in August 2000. We did business with Aon and were trying to get them to allow us access to their servers so we could set up transaction processing so their systems could interface with our proprietary (crap) software. Their offices were well appointed too.

Here are some photos from someone who apparently worked for Aon in the South Tower on the 101st floor.

http://davidbardes.com/wtc/welcome.html



According to the caption, the man facing the camera survived, while the man with his back towards the camera did not.



This man was not at work that day.



Anytime I felt stressed at work, or pissed off, or just having a shitty day in general, I did this; walked up to a window and peered down. And remembered that I had it pretty damn good. If you can recall the dot com boom, well in mid/late 2000 it had stagnated and several of my friends had lost their jobs as web/software developers. Despite the fact that I hated my job (well, sometimes.), I was 23 years old, working for one of the biggest companies in New York, had my own place in Park Slope (before the hipsters moved in and ruined it), an attractive girlfriend (now my wife), I really had it better off than most people and had no reason to complain.

And it was all ripped away from me a year later.

Thanks for the interesting insights as to the differences in the offices.

I think you're right about that lavish Cantor lobby being on the north side of 105. Howard Lutnick, the CEO of Cantor who survives, mentions in his book that his 105th floor office viewed north towards Manhattan and the Empire State Building. So the lobby being on the north side would make sense.

Did Cantor have the Rodin sculptures all over the 5 floors or were they confined to that area outside the executive offices?

Also, sometimes I hear that Cantor occupied 101-105 and other times I hear it as 101, and 103-105. Did they occupy any of the 102nd floor? Or was that just Alliance Consulting?

Also, did you ever go up to Windows on the World much?
 

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Thanks for the interesting insights as to the differences in the offices.

I think you're right about that lavish Cantor lobby being on the north side of 105. Howard Lutnick, the CEO of Cantor who survives, mentions in his book that his 105th floor office viewed north towards Manhattan and the Empire State Building. So the lobby being on the north side would make sense.

Did Cantor have the Rodin sculptures all over the 5 floors or were they confined to that area outside the executive offices?

Also, sometimes I hear that Cantor occupied 101-105 and other times I hear it as 101, and 103-105. Did they occupy any of the 102nd floor? Or was that just Alliance Consulting?

Also, did you ever go up to Windows on the World much?
As far as I remember, the sculptures were only on the 105th floor. Cantor's other office floors were generally bereft of special appointments, and rather spartan compared to the executive area.

I can confirm that Cantor (and their associated companies, including eSpeed, Cantor Gaming, etc.) occupied floors 101-105. However, they did share floors 101 and 102 with other companies. Cantor took up approximately 40% of the 101st floor, and that floor was shared with Kidder and Peabody and a small non-profit. On the 102nd floor, Cantor occupied half of the floor, and that was shared with a Japanese bank (name escapes me at the moment), and Alliance Consulting.

I didn't go up to Windows all that much, but occasionally myself and the rest of the Marsh IT department would occasionally go up to Greatest Bar in the World for happy hour. I wasn't a huge fan of the place because it was so damn expensive, and quite honestly, I was always fine with drinking at (insert random hole-in-the-wall-bar name).

Actually, on September 7, 2001, the last day I was ever at the WTC (the day before I got on a plane to fly to San Diego to attend my dad's Navy retirement ceremony, and hence why I survived the attacks), we had dinner and drinks at Windows. And that was the last time I ever saw any of my colleagues. All but one was killed in the attack, and I suspect it was when the plane struck because their desks were on the 96th floor on the North face of the building, right where the plane impacted. Had I been there that day, at my desk on the Northwest corner of the 99th floor, well, the wing sliced through that floor, but I don't really want to speculate.
 

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Meh. I wish they'd built it above ground. That's all I'm going to say about that.

By the way, that second rendering is outdated. I'm so glad they didn't build the Libeskind master plan with shorter towers and the 60-story-tower-masquerading-as-a-supertall "Freedom" Tower, would have been a blight on the skyline. At least the current plan restores the skyline in a form resembling the Twin Towers (see below):

This is one of STR's renderings, thanks STR in advance.


I think 8 Spruce Street is superior to anything being built at Ground Zero.
 
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