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Photography question?

If I am taking a picture of someone from 5 feet away and they are running, do I set the shutter speed or the aperture first? And what would the settings be for both of them? (using a film camera)

If I am taking a picture of a sign from 200 feet away, do I set the shutter speed or the aperture first? And what would the settings be for both of them? (also using a film camera)


Please help me please I want to take good pictures for a project I'm working on! Thank you!
 

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If I am taking a picture of someone from 5 feet away and they are running, do I set the shutter speed or the aperture first? And what would the settings be for both of them? (using a film camera)

If I am taking a picture of a sign from 200 feet away, do I set the shutter speed or the aperture first? And what would the settings be for both of them? (also using a film camera)

Please help me please I want to take good pictures for a project I'm working on! Thank you!
The shutter speed might be an issue with motion blur, for someone running I'd be looking at getting it as fast as I can up to about 1/500 of a second to make sure you avoid that.

Aperture is going to control how much depth of field you have which also depends on the distance to the subject and the focal length. For a moving subject I wouldn't look to shoot with too large(i.e. small number) F-stop if your lens has one.

Unless your shooting in very good light I'd recommend at least ISO 400 film.
 

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Hey guys,
I might want to buy the Fujifilm finepix X10 or the newer X20 compact camera. I'm mostly interested because of the small size (I need to carry it around on long trips and it should be discreet) and because of the low price (I'm not very rich and I'm a beginner). I read some reviews and both models seem to be pretty decent cameras for being so compact, but I don't know if they're suitable for all uses. Does anyone know if these cameras would be good enough to take decent street pics and especially to photograph details on the façades of buildings?
Thanks in advance. :)
 

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The X20 is a highly regarded compact camera, but for the same price you may want to consider Mirrorless interchangeable cameras like the Fuji X-A1 or the Olympus PEN E-PM2 or E-PL5.
These mirrorless cameras are still fairly small and pocketable in coat or jacket pockets

Nevertheless, the X20 is a fine choice and is one of the more appropriately priced premium compact cameras when compared to the Sony RX100 Mark III
 

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I'm thinking of replacing my five year old Nikon D90 with a Nikon D5200. Anyone with a good knowledge of cameras here who can give some advice on if that's a waste of money or a good idea?

From what I've read it seems like the D5200 takes considerably better quality pictures and doesn't really lack any of the features that the D90 has.
 

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I'm thinking of replacing my five year old Nikon D90 with a Nikon D5200. Anyone with a good knowledge of cameras here who can give some advice on if that's a waste of money or a good idea?

From what I've read it seems like the D5200 takes considerably better quality pictures and doesn't really lack any of the features that the D90 has.
I shoot Canon, but did find out that the D5200 doesn't have a built-in autofocus motor so you'd have to use lenses that have it. I don't fully understand this, but your D90 had this feature and the D5200 doesn't.

From wikipedia "Like Nikon's other consumer level DSLRs, the D5200 has no in-body autofocus motor"

I can't comment on anything else though.
 

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I shoot Canon, but did find out that the D5200 doesn't have a built-in autofocus motor so you'd have to use lenses that have it. I don't fully understand this, but your D90 had this feature and the D5200 doesn't.

From wikipedia "Like Nikon's other consumer level DSLRs, the D5200 has no in-body autofocus motor"

I can't comment on anything else though.
D90 seems to be the only, non-professional, Nikon camera which has that feature. Most lenses seems to have it instead. I don't know if there's a better quality of the auto-focus if it's done in the camera instead of in the lens though.
 

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I have not seen any difference because I don't use it... To get the most out of it you need to have a remote control, or shutter release cable. However, all the articles I've read agree that Mirror Lock-up adds to the sharpness and overall quality of the photo. I would not doubt it. Between good glass, a steady tripod, accurate settings and mirror lock-up, you should be able to get the most out of your evening photography.
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How do you view pictures in posts on this forum?

I don't like scrolling or sliding or page-down, it gets annoying.

Ideally would be to view pictures full screen, one by one instead of nonstop scrolling the page.

Any ideas?
 

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If I am taking a picture of someone from 5 feet away and they are running, do I set the shutter speed or the aperture first? And what would the settings be for both of them? (using a film camera)

If I am taking a picture of a sign from 200 feet away, do I set the shutter speed or the aperture first? And what would the settings be for both of them? (also using a film camera)


Please help me please I want to take good pictures for a project I'm working on! Thank you!
If you want motion blur then you should set the camera to shutter priority and have probably a shutter speed of between 1/30 & 1/80 but if you want the subject to be frozen in it's tracks then use a faster shutter speed of anything over 1/200 or use Aperture priority and use the smallest setting of your lens. As for the sign if it's in daylight and the light is good use aperture priority and adjust the aperture till your camera's meter reads a fast shutter speed
 

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Is photography a good profession? Can you become a millionaire with photography? Regards, Peter Oluoch, http://dvcaf.uonbi.ac.ke
Only if you're good at it. Today's digital age makes it easy for anyone to get good results and with the new age of HDR almost any tom dick n harry can take a poor photograph and make it look good so there's too much competition these days. So if you work hard and can market yourself well then you can make plenty of money specially in Weddings & Portraiture , sports events can make you plenty of money too.
 

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I have a new thought. I'm looking into getting the D7100, which is the direct successor of my current D90. It's five years since I bought my D90 and it feels like it's five years where very much has happened in camera technology.

Is it a waste to buy a D7100 if I already have a D90 or is it a big difference between them? Judging by tests and comparasions between them on the internet it seems like there's a huge difference at least. Any advice? Should I make the upgrade?
 

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I'd say go for the D7100. Here's a site comparing the D7100 and D90.

To me, one advantage of the D7100 is double the resolution (24 MP vs 12 MP). If you want to print big, this is good.

Another is the number of focus points (51 vs 11). Although I've gotten by fine with 9 focus points on my 5D II.

The D7100 also has in-camera HDR if you're into that.

One of the best advantages is the number of cross-type focus points (15 vs 1). Cross-type focus points can better find focus in dark situations. My 5D II has only the center point as cross-type. Just the other day I was out in the early morning and couldn't use the outer points, but the center point found focus. So 15 cross-type points is really good if you use the camera inside your house (a house is much darker to a camera than you'd think).

The D7100 is also weather sealed so if you're in light rain, don't worry!

Its dynamic range is a little better than the D90 too, which means it captures colors a little better.

The viewfinder has 100% coverage, although the actual viewfinder is a touch smaller than the D90's. Sometimes I take a shot with my 5D II and find the edge has something I don't want. Sure, it's easy to crop out, but it'd be nice to see exactly what you're capturing. I did just order the 5D III which addresses the viewfinder problem and cross-type points.

The battery life is a little longer on the D7100 too.

The D7100 shutter can shoot up to 1/8000s whereas the D90 was 1/4000s.
 

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How should I take photos of stars to get good photos? I have tried some things with My D5100 but the result is not like I expected. Thanks
 

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How should I take photos of stars to get good photos? I have tried some things with My D5100 but the result is not like I expected. Thanks
What exactly is the problem? Not bright enough? Something else?

The brightness of stars is so low to a camera that you can't have too much brightness going on elsewhere. Otherwise the other elements will be too bright in the final photo.

You may be using ISO 100 or 200 to reduce noise, but your exposures would have to be at least 30 seconds or so to get enough of the starlight. Start with ISO 800 or 1600 (I try to use ISO 800 so it's not too noisy). Keep the exposure times short if you want to avoid star trails. I use a 35mm lens on a full-frame camera and I get very slight star trails after exposing for about 12 seconds. If you use a wider lens you can use a longer exposure (~20 seconds).

Besides high ISO, you also need to have your lens wide open. If you're using a lens at f/4 it's going to take longer than 15 seconds to get a good exposure. That could be your problem. I use from f/1.8-f/2.0.

I think this image (by me) was 10 seconds. There were street lights nearby which lit the rocks. The lights in the background were ships on the ocean.



This one (also by me) had no lights around (yay!) so I was able to light the bus stop myself with my flashlight. It also had an exposure of around 10 seconds. Continuous light from the street is usually too bright so when you can light something yourself, it's much better.



Some of it also has to do with post-processing. I use Lightroom and use the clarity slider on the star area which makes it pop more.

Do you have an example of one that didn't work that you can post?
 

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the problem with long exposures is your stars will become trails because the earth is constantly moving (1 degree every four minutes, if I am not mistaken).

So for sharp shars, I guess the ISO has to be high. Very high.
 
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