SkyscraperCity banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 21718 Posts

·
Registered Pusher
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Graft and Corruption

what can u say about graft and corruption in the philippines???

reply na dali,,, my position paper kc ako dito... hehehe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Graft and corruption… Those in a position of power are most often able to exercise discretion as to how they will apply or exercise that power. Whether they are bouncers in a nightclub or leaders of government, some will use their position to fatten their wallets.

Clearly, bribery and poverty go hand in hand. Like the chicken and the egg question, which one causes which? Countries may be corrupt because of poverty, but it’s usually not the other way around. China is a good example. Most economists will say corruption slows the development of a country, but a corrupt country is very capable of growing fast. The top complaint of a Chinese citizen is corruption, but foreign investors are stumbling over each other to pour in money to China.

Rich countries are not immune to it. Washington lobbyists look at it as a part of lawmaking. Campaign contributions are steered toward lawmakers who may be able to help influence some spending to benefit the lobbyist’s client. In the Philippines, some politicians expect to get something back from the projects they approve.

In the spirit of decency most of these offenders go through elaborate rituals to hide the act of accepting bribes. Rarely do they come and say, “It won’t get done unless you give me what I want in return.” The police officer who stops you in Makati might ask for some beer money. The border officer might ask for an “expediting fee”. Double meaning can help smooth the discussion so when a Kenyan soldier with an automatic rifle asks you to “discuss the situation over chai”, it is good to know that chai means both “tea” and “bribe”. The victim on the other hand will respond by inserting the currency between the pages of a passport. Of course there’s always the brown envelope most people prefer to use.

Socialist economies tend to have higher levels of corruption than others. An economist at Stockholm University found four variables that contribute to the increase in corruption.
1. Education level of adults
2. Open to imports (less opportunities for smuggling)
3. Freedom of the press (independent journalists will expose and thereby curtail corruption)
4. Number of days to open a business (red tape).

Last, the primary factor that contributes to corruption is government. More government means more opportunity for bribery.
 

·
Globalizing LA
Joined
·
880 Posts
^^ Good points, but if you really look at it, there will ALWAYS be some sort of corruption in this world. And, most importantly, corruption is not static. It is as dynamic as globalization itself. This means that sometimes corruption will seem like its everywhere, and other times it will not. It's always fluctuating as power, money, laws, attitudes, and culture changes and shifts between societies and people.

So instead of having dialogues about how to avoid corruption or whining that there will always be corruption in the Philippines, we should focus on how to REDUCE corruption.

Right now, I think the economic growth is helping the Philippines alot more than just fiscal matters. Some might argue that the rich are getting richer and the poor, poorer. But I think this economic trend is slowly providing a catylst for the middle class to seek better opportunites in this market (I'm thinking the small business entreprenuers). They also provide more jobs that are available to the masses. This includes the big players like the SM Malls that are always sprouting here and there. The jobs might be minimum wage, but when the number of job openings are in the thousands, the economies of scale are more beneficial for everyone (as oppose to having only a few high paying jobs to a selected pool of people).

Now lets talk about the rich. As they get richer, let's look at the flip side of the coin. With more wealth, comes more accountability. How? Because as their bank accounts grow, they have more pera to lose should they mismanage. More corruption you should say? I think more people are going to be looking behind their backs, especially the foreigners. With more money at stake shared with more people, someone will be more bound to whistle-blow from a crooked deal. Of course, this is my opinion only and I'm not saying all this applies to everybody, but these ideas definitely apply in various degrees.

Another example. I think it is not the job of the police to get rid of crime. Their job is to REDUCE the crime rate to the lowest possible levels. And to maintain their vigilance indefinitely, as long as society itself continues to exist.

I don't expect the Philippines to ever get rid of corruption. There is corruption here in the U.S. as well! But what I do like about the states is that even though we have it here, our overall legal and social system keeps it in balance with our values.

That's what I wish for the Philippines: To just REDUCE corruption (trying to get rid of it is a useless cause) and keep it in balance with our changing values.
 

·
COO - Child of Owner
Joined
·
2,281 Posts
from pcij.org

IF you want to see the latest and the most powerful vehicles the car industry has to offer, visit the parking lot of the House of Representatives. Lawmakers show they have an impeccable — and expensive — taste in cars.

In recent years, the Mitsubishi Pajero was the most common SUV of choice in the Lower House. The trend is changing. These days, the SUVs come in various forms, sizes and brand names. Nissan Patrols are aplenty. So are Isuzu Troopers. Eye-catching in their seeming somber stance are Ford Expeditions, Chateaus, Everests and Tamaraws. There are also Chrysler Town and Country, Ssangyong Rexton and Toyota Land Cruiser vans.

Rep. Acmad Tomawis of party-list Ang Laban ng Indiginong Filipino (ALIF) was seen alighting from a Hummer sporting a number 8 plate, front and back. Hummer’s look-alike, the Mercedes Benz G series, is the choice of Quezon City Rep. Mary Ann Susano. Of course, there are BMWs, Jaguars and Mercedes Benzes in medium sizes, too.

Both the Hummer and Benz G series cost around P3 to 6 million while the Ford SUVs are worth P1.5 million and up. Basilan Rep. Gerry Salappudin’s Korean-built Ssangyong Rexton ranges from P1.7 to 2.2 million (exclusive of taxes).
In the beginning, the number 8 plate showed the province and district of the lawmaker using the vehicle. While the vanity plate was displayed in front, the regular plate number was kept at the back. But these symbols of responsibility and accountability have been ditched. These days, very few lawmakers keep the regular plate, as many have opted to sandwich their cars with the 8 vanity plate. There is no way of knowing who owns the car.
 

·
COO - Child of Owner
Joined
·
2,281 Posts
http://www.cmfr.com.ph/chua1.htm

what a congressman can receive:

Salary P35,000 a month
Published expenses P200,000 a month
Allowance from the Speaker P50,000-100,000 a month
Christmas gift from the Speaker P100,000-200,000
Occasional gift from Malacañang (Christmas) P100,000-150,000
Election for the speakership as much as P200,000
Attendance in a plenary session to vote on selected national bills P50,000 (can go up to 500,000 for urgent, controversial measures)
Special occasions (e.g. barangay elections) P50,000
Foreign travel $300 per diem
As officer or committee chairman Varies, depending on expenses
Pork barrel (Priority Development Assistance Fund and Public Works Fund) P65 million a year

















 

·
woof! woof!
Joined
·
2,864 Posts
^^ Talking about accountability. Very interesting breakdown of their 'unexplained' wealth. Their salaries simply pale in comparisson to the multimillion assets they own. Barya lang.
 

·
SPEED
Joined
·
3,131 Posts
i don't think you can grease a police officer in the US to pardon a traffic violation or grease a city employee to expedite a pending business permit. Those are the kinds of corruption that can be eliminated even in the PHils to foster an efficient environment conducive for business and productivity ,down to the grassroots level. If you consider the income of these politicians in the PHils and their declared assets ,not even counting the hidden ones, it is a huge disparity and you can say a big giant anomaly how they can amass such wealth. Pork barrel for projects , what projects!!? piecemeal ,deadend projects like basketball courts and waiting sheds.
such a shame these SAME people have been running the PHils for decades and the country is still muddling along. Fortunately there is a glimmer of light in the tunnel but i credit mostly the OFWs hard work and sacrifice and the multiplier effect their remittances are spearheading.
I am glad GMA is at the helm though , but there are still so many thickfaced, la silbe crocodiles around her.
You say what's two decades? Two decades is enough to transform a backward country to a powerhouse economy or at least where the quality of life has been uplifted for the critical mass.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
i don't think you can grease a police officer in the US to pardon a traffic violation or grease a city employee to expedite a pending business permit. Those are the kinds of corruption that can be eliminated even in the PHils to foster an efficient environment conducive for business and productivity ,down to the grassroots level. If you consider the income of these politicians in the PHils and their declared assets ,not even counting the hidden ones, it is a huge disparity and you can say a big giant anomaly how they can amass such wealth. Pork barrel for projects , what projects!!? piecemeal ,deadend projects like basketball courts and waiting sheds.
such a shame these SAME people have been running the PHils for decades and the country is still muddling along. Fortunately there is a glimmer of light in the tunnel but i credit mostly the OFWs hard work and sacrifice and the multiplier effect their remittances are spearheading.
I am glad GMA is at the helm though , but there are still so many thickfaced, la silbe crocodiles around her.
You say what's two decades? Two decades is enough to transform a backward country to a powerhouse economy or at least where the quality of life has been uplifted for the critical mass.

That's why GMA is walking on friggin eggs. As another forumer has said, it's not about institutionalizing corruption, but about having to balance diverse interests so that the country comes out on top anyway. Considering how corruption has been so ingrained in our system, it's almost like chasing the wind for one person to eliminate it during a term of six years or so. But at least our economic team is plowing ahead with the implementation of important reforms.

When the U.S. was just starting out, corruption was also rife in every level of society. But with its economic ascendancy, the level of perceptible corruption has also diminished.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Dvorak, thanks for sharing that bit of info on our government officials. One has to wonder, given such low pay, why people go into politics - for the love of serving the country or....

On the other hand, going into politics costs a lot of money. Can a person of meager means enter politics in the Philippines and win? If the answer is no, the vehicles driven by our politicians are de rigeur of the rich so it should not be a surprise to find such vehicles in government parking lots.

If the answer is yes, does that candidate have to make a pact with the devil to get the opportunity and what does the devil get in return?
 

·
SPEED
Joined
·
3,131 Posts
It must be a very lucrative career as even millionaire manny paquio is willing to hang his gloves to join the fray
I believe those whose sole interest is to really serve the nation without the funds and machinery will not win.
 

·
Globalizing LA
Joined
·
880 Posts
Totoo...It's hard for anyone without the funds to win. Politicians should be elected based on their experience, charisma, and persona.

If filipinos like to pick actors/actresses as their politicians, I understand the charisma and persona part...but where the heck does the experience part come from??!!! I'm not saying all people in the entertainment and movie industry are politically illiterate. It does make sense though that someone who spends more of their time studying law, history, civics, and world events will perform much better as a politician than a person who spend lots of time singing on Wowowee or having some lead role in a GMA7 flick.

I think the mentality of some filipino voters are part of the blame in the big political scheme of things. And the corrupted ones wouldn't hesistate to take advantage of these things. Do I even need to mention GMA's predecessor?!! :eek:hno:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
It must be a very lucrative career as even millionaire manny paquio is willing to hang his gloves to join the fray
I believe those whose sole interest is to really serve the nation without the funds and machinery will not win.
The public post should not be taken as a career, and lucrative at that. These candidates who only see public office as a career or family business should not be voted. They do not deserve to be in public post. They only wanted power. Instead of public service, they wanted to be served.

Why bother electing them in office?
 

·
TheLibotero
Joined
·
13,851 Posts
More pork graft exposed

Dubious pork barrel expenditures have gone techie.

A civil society report on the use of congressional pork barrel uncovered at least six information technology (IT) projects in Luzon in which basic, “unbranded” personal computers installed in public schools were allegedly bought at P217,500 each.

An unbranded PC with licensed software would normally cost just around P50,000 at the most, noted the first installment of “PDAF Watch,” an initiative of the Caucus of Development NGO Networks (Code-NGO).

The “overpriced” IT projects were found in Metro Manila, Southern Tagalog and Central Luzon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
327 Posts
^^nakakalungkot at nakakainis talaga kapag nakakabasa ako ng mga balitang ganyan. overpriced lamp posts are bad enough already. but for cryin out loud kids are using those computers! marami pang mabibiling equipment para sa mga kabataan natin ang pera na yan. that's really the lowest of the low :eek:hno:
 

·
SPEED
Joined
·
3,131 Posts
lahat ng procurement ata tainted with overpricing sa Pilipinas parang norm nat to. mga hayop. naghihikahos ang bansa nila ,ninanakawan pa. and don't forget the very legal 10% commision the official gets in procurment transactions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
Well exposing these anomalies would surely halt these kind of transactions....let us help and expose these kind of anomalies...let us not glorify these politicians...remember that they are slaves not masters of our country..since they decided to be a public servant...PWE!!
 

·
Atenista sa Frisco
Joined
·
11,517 Posts
Eto pa and isang pinagkakakitaan ng mga corrupt na public officials...
http://www.manilatimes.net/national/2007/mar/20/yehey/top_stories/20070320top1.html

Tuesday, March 20, 2007

Customs loses seized goods worth billions

By William Depasupil, Reporter

UP to a billion pesos worth of smuggled goods seized by the Bureau of Customs—and supposed to be stored and secured in a private warehouse inside the Harbour Center Terminal in North Harbor Manila—could not be accounted for, The Manila Times learned Monday from a Bureau of Customs (BOC) source.

The source and some BOC officials believe Customs insiders and businessmen have conspired to hijack and sell the goods to the local market, as in the case of the P40-million worth of smuggled pork that was also pilfered from the same private warehouse used by the bureau.

Documents obtained by The Manila Times show that the Customs bureau, since last year, has been using the Sigma Seven Storage and Warehousing, Inc., a private warehouse located in the Harbour Center Terminal.

The use of the warehouse, according to ranking Customs officials, who asked not to be identified, is anomalous and a violation of the Tariff and Customs Code of the Philippines because “it is not a Customs bonded Warehouse.”

The officials told The Times no Customs guards were assigned to safeguard the seized goods inside the warehouse.

“The seized goods, which are already considered government property, are not amply protected in that warehouse. Why Morales [the Bureau chief] allowed them to be stored there is a million dollar question,” the source added.

The Times called up Commissioner Napoleon Morales to get his side but his cell phone was off. A call was also made to his close-in executive assistant, Vernie Enciso, who refused to answer the call.

Another call was made to Commissioner Morales’s office, but the secretary said the commissioner was in a meeting somewhere else.

Records showed that among the goods stored in the Sigma Seven Storage warehouse were several tons of electronic appliances, DVD players, high-quality bags, ceramic tiles, signature shoes, steels bars and various kinds of clothing.

Based on the list certified by the warehouse supervisor, Deo Cabaluna, the warehouse also contains “two empty containers vans.”

“Where are the contents of those container vans? That question is actually the topic of discussions on the enforcement security services under Gen. Gualberto and the Task Force Antismuggling (TFAS) head, Collector Alexander Arcilla,” the source told The Times.

“I believe that the contents of the two containers vans have already been spirited out of the warehouse, just like what they did when they pilfered the P40-million shipment of smuggled pork meat, which up to now remains unaccounted for,” the source added.

According to the source, all goods seized by TFAS and other units of the Customs bureau were stored in Sigma. The value of these goods could easily be several billions.

“There is no way to conduct an honest to goodness audit of those goods. And I would like to believe that what is stored now inside that warehouse could only be one-third or less of the total amount of goods seized since last year,” the source pointed out.

Last year, Morales issued a memorandum order which categorically specified that only persons authorized by the Office of the Commissioner are to be allowed to enter the warehouse.

But when the “hot meat” shipment was being claimed by the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) and the Veterinary Quarantine Office (VQO) for proper disposal, their representatives discovered that the BAI seal on the container vans were fake.

It was also found out that 40 to 50 percent of the contents of each of the four container vans, containing 200,000 kilos of meat each, were missing.

The hot meat came from China. It had no import permit from the BAI and no veterinary quarantine clearance.

The pilferage has been the subject of a probe by the National Bureau of Investigation.

Charges have been filed against four private individuals and one Customs official, who, The Times source added, was made a sacrificial lamb to spare Morales and several other officials from the office of the commissioner.

“Commissioner Morales should have been included in the charge sheet for command responsibility. Remember that he signed the memorandum that only officials from his office are allowed to open and go inside the warehouse,” the source pointed out.
Warehouse owner gives up on Customs
By William B. Depasupil, Reporter
Manila Times
http://www.manilatimes.net/national/2007/mar/21/yehey/top_stories/20070321top2.html

THE operator of a private warehouse, Sigma Seven Storage & Warehousing Inc., has notified the Bureau of Customs it would no longer use the facility as storage area of seized smuggled goods, after its officers were charged in connection with the reported pilferage of goods in the warehouse.

At the same time, the country’s biggest local producers group, the Federation of Philippine Industries, on Tuesday acknowledged that smuggling remains unabated at the customs zone, estimating yearly losses of at least P40 billion in duties and taxes.

Jesus Arranza, FPI president, in a recent letter to Customs Commissioner Napoleon Morales, requested for a post-entry audit of at least two importers of steel products, the Mileage Asia Corp. and MBA Steel Corp., in order to establish profiles of both firms.

Arranza said the request was made by the FPI as part of it efforts to stop technical smuggling by way of misdeclaration, undervaluation and misclas*sification of imports.

He said “the steel industry has been complaining about rampant smuggling by some importers which is competing unfairly with their products and thereby depriving the government of taxes and duties.”

The notice to terminate the use of Sigma warehouse at the Manila Harbor Center was contained in a letter sent to Morales by Romeo S. Fernando Jr. It gives the customs bureau 30 days to clear the warehouse.

“The company expresses its resentment in the baseless cases which were filed notwithstanding that such facility is being utilized free of charge and no cost whatsoever to the government. It seems the goodwill of the company towards the government was not well-taken by some sectors,” Fernando said.

He and Sigma warehousemen Dionisio Menil and Diomedes Cabalanua were among those charged by the National Bureau of Investigation as behind the pilferage of a shipment of P40-million worth of smuggled pork meat from China. Also charged with malversation of public property were James Enriquez, the commissioner’s chief of staff; Facundo Bitanga, Customs auction and cargo disposal division chief; and Bonifacio Cruz and Pedrito Magsino of MC Bro’s trading and garbage company.

Deputy Commissioner Reynaldo Nicolas told The Manila Times that the bureau is now looking for other warehouses.

The NBI also found Alexander Arcilla, chief of the customs Task Force Antismuggling (TFAS); and Nanie Koh and Roger Manlangit of ACDD liable for the pilferage and could be charged with violations of the antigraft law and ethics code.

A high-ranking Customs officials who requested anonymity earlier told The Times that up to a billion pesos worth of smuggled goods seized by Customs and supposed to be stored at Sigma could not be accounted for.

The source and some Customs officials believe bureau insiders and businessmen have conspired to hijack and sell the goods in the local market, citing the case of the P40-million worth of smuggled pork that was also pilfered from the warehouse.

Arranza had earlier shown documents from the International Monetary Fund that the Customs lost some P110 billion in duties and taxes due to rampant technical smuggling.

In 2004 alone, Arranza said, the bureau lost P65 billion, representing the 10 percent value-added tax (VAT), and another P45 billion from the 7-percent duty average rate on imported goods or a total of P110 billion.

“The IMF gave us figures of all exports to the Philippines,” he said. “Total export reached $45 billion but only $32 billion was reflected or a deficiency of $13 billion. Where is the $13 billion?”
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Graft and corruption in the Philippines should be addressed from the topmost to the lowest level. It cannot be denied that corruption exists not only in the government but even in private institutions or even in some poor communities. That is because everyone feels to be deprived so they take all that there is to the extent that they become kurakot. We must fight graft and corruption by not tolerating these corrupt individuals and not giving in to their selfish desires. We can start by not giving bribes in exchange of favors we need.
 
1 - 20 of 21718 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top