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heres an article about their being an african union that resembles europes. they need to stop copying europe and concentrate on region building. Africa does not have the same geogrphical features as europe and different strategies need to be used. East, west, north and south african unions would be more appropriate. It is also disturbing that it is being touted by a totalatarian dictator in Kadhafi. :down:


http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/2007063...summitlibya;_ylt=Ar1Bv3Z_xPE0TJ9aTuXQnYy96Q8F
 

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heres an article about their being an african union that resembles europes. they need to stop copying europe and concentrate on region building. Africa does not have the same geogrphical features as europe and different strategies need to be used. East, west, north and south african unions would be more appropriate. It is also disturbing that it is being touted by a totalatarian dictator in Kadhafi
100% aggree with what you said:) The idea that the a dictator from a pariah state "runs" the African Union makes me vomit!

Personally, I never believe in African Union stuff, this is something for dreamers and to write reggae songs for parties or poems about!
Africans differ too much from each other to form a unity, even in Europe which is a lot smaller than Africa, first signs of the system´s falling apart rise to the surface!

But I am a huge supporter of regional blocks, West African have a lot in common, same is the case for Central Africans, East African , northern Africans and Southern Africans! But what frustrates me is that not even these blocks function well (logistically, financially,, structurally and they are hopelessly under-staffed and inefficient and dreadfully bureucratic). So first of all, we have to build up our countries, form a unity within our countries (which is a big task for Nigeria already) then we can work to regional governance but I don´t and will never believe in African Union (can only be celebrated on festivals, arts and film industries etc)..I am too much of a realist to belive in African Union and the like.....and believe me even building effective regional governance will be a herculean task to perform!
 

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I just don't understand how they re gonna do that successfully headed by one man.I also don't like the idea to be specific....how are they gonna deal with budgets?already we had over 35 countries oweing AFRICAN UNION fees, forgotten their responsibilities at hand and talking about UNITED STATES OF AFRICA.THEY SUCK!
The countries with bigger budgets is gonna be cheated.Don't ya think so?
 

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establishing the European Union took decades of work in harmonizing systems, laws, trade and economic policies in an environment that is arguably much more developed than Africa. Achieving the same in Africa is indeed going to be a monumental task of epic proportions and i personally don't think Gaddafi has the faintest clue on how to achieve this in a continent as diverse as Africa. So i agree with Matthias that focus should be on strengthening regional economic blocs from SADC, ECOWAS, EAC etc.

As with the EU you need to secure the support of the biggest economic and political powers such as South Africa, Nigeria, Algeria, Egypt,Senegal, Angola, Kenya, Ghana both from the anglophone and francophone communities (sadly Africa is still divided along their colonial master's nationalities!!) factions to really lend credence to such calls. Lastly you need a strong leader who can sell the concept. Gaddafi is hardly the right guy to do this given his leadership's lack of record with democratic principles and transparency. All he is selling is his Anti-Americanism and show casing his oil wealth by driving his 200 cars through the desserts to Accra.
 

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heres an article about their being an african union that resembles europes. they need to stop copying europe and concentrate on region building. Africa does not have the same geogrphical features as europe and different strategies need to be used. East, west, north and south african unions would be more appropriate. It is also disturbing that it is being touted by a totalatarian dictator in Kadhafi. :down:


http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/2007063...summitlibya;_ylt=Ar1Bv3Z_xPE0TJ9aTuXQnYy96Q8F

African Lion,

I agree. It will not get off the ground so long as Muommar Kadhafi is in it for himself. He is no champion of democracy, good governance and liberalism. He oversaw the murder of more than 1,000 black Africans in Tripoli. He started wars with Chad and sponsored others in Liberia and Sierra Leone. He supports a madman Robert Mugabe who has destroyed Zimbabwe. Even South Africa thinks he is a joke and a relic of the past despite Kadhafi's support for the ANC during the apartheid struggle.
 

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If this union actually took place, I would oppose it.

Who is Kadafi to make such a proposal? The only reason why he's tilting to the rest of Africa is because the Arab countries ignore Libya. He does not speak for Africa, and nobody really should deserve to.

Africa is not ready for a union like the EU. Many countries can't control what's inside their borders, let alone unite with countries on the other side of the continent. Probably in a few decades, when a few countries hit high standards.
 

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If this union actually took place, I would oppose it.

Who is Kadafi to make such a proposal? The only reason why he's tilting to the rest of Africa is because the Arab countries ignore Libya. He does not speak for Africa, and nobody really should deserve to.

Africa is not ready for a union like the EU. Many countries can't control what's inside their borders, let alone unite with countries on the other side of the continent. Probably in a few decades, when a few countries hit high standards.
Agreed. The Arab world thinks he's an outcast, even the rogue regimes like Syria and Iran do not take him seriously. Even Saddam Hussein did not pay much attention to him when he ruled Iraq. That is why Kadhafi has turned to Africa because the Arab world doesn't listen to him. But even in Africa, the larger states with democratic governments such as South Africa, Nigeria and Kenya do not give much credence to the Libyan strongman.
 

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heres an article about their being an african union that resembles europes. they need to stop copying europe and concentrate on region building. Africa does not have the same geogrphical features as europe and different strategies need to be used. East, west, north and south african unions would be more appropriate. It is also disturbing that it is being touted by a totalatarian dictator in Kadhafi. :down:


http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/2007063...summitlibya;_ylt=Ar1Bv3Z_xPE0TJ9aTuXQnYy96Q8F
I'm going to have to agree completely. Let's focus on creating stronger regional unions-the EAC, the Central African community, ECOWAS, SADC, etc, etc-those are all very close to coming into fruition, and are more realistic to.
 

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AU: Why We Oppose Gaddafi, By Yar’Adua
From Josephine Lohor in Abuja with agency reports, 07.03.2007

President Umaru Musa Yar’Adua yesterday expl-ained his disagreement with Col. Muammar Gaddafi over the Libyan leader’s proposal for the establishment of a United States of Africa. He said the continent was confronted with “greater challenges” which need immediate tackling, rather than setting up a union government.
However, Senegal and a number of African countries have disagreed with Nigeria’s position, saying the continent would only survive if it united now under one common government to enable it stand the tide of globalisation.
Speaking in Accra, Ghana at the ninth session of the African Union heads of state meeting, President Yaradua said Nigeria favours a “gradualist approach” to the establishment of a Union Government in Africa in view of the critical need for African countries “to focus more on the urgent task of strengthening and consolidating internal governance and growth structures at the moment”.
Before his formal reception into the Assembly of African Heads of State and Government along with his Mauritanian counterpart, Oud Cheikh Abdallahi, Yar’Adua said although Nigeria had always supported the principle of the ultimate goal of the African Union being “full and political integration leading to the evolvement of a United States of Africa”, he warned that care must be taken not to relegate from the front burner the key issues confronting the continent.
He also called on the leaders of the continent to be more committed to ideals of the AU if the goal of an integrated African continent would be achieved.
“Dear colleagues,” he said, “there are clear and present threats and challenges which we must face up to. We cannot ignore the social, economic, and political inequalities within and among our member States, which if not bridged, would pose daunting obstacles on the march towards viable political and economic union.”
Defending Nigeria’s position, Yar’Adua said “our perspective is mediated by the critical need at this point in our continent’s developmental process, for the nations of Africa to focus more on the strengthening and consolidation of internal governance and growth structures, and on more robust regional integration.
“Focus on inter-regional collaboration is equally critical especially considering that all the five regions of Africa face essentially the same challenges of poor infrastructure, inadequate energy, endemic poverty, and the twin bane of HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis.
“Conversely, these issues, along with the challenges of conflict, disease and poverty, drive the imperative for us to present a united and common front in the global arena. There is strength in the synergy that is only possible from functional unity.
“This brings me to another critical variable in this debate: the degree of our commitment to our continental body and the essence of our Africanness. To the extent that we continue to subscribe and owe more allegiance to extra-continental bodies to the neglect of the AU, our steps towards functional integration will remain faltering.”
The president enjoined his colleagues to pay attention to the improvement of continental infrastructure such as transportation, communication, and power, as well as common agricultural, education, migration, and other policies which he said are fundamental to the integration of Africa.
He thanked the leaders of the African countries gathered for the “overwhelming felicitation and solidarity on our historic political transition” which brought him in as Nigeria’s President.
“As I present my first address to the political leadership of the African continent under the aegis of the African Union, I wish to reiterate Nigeria’s unmediated commitment to advancing the cause and ideals of the AU,” he said.
But delegates at the Accra meeting said the atmosphere was charged as a group of states led by Libya's Muammar Gaddafi and Senegal's Abdoulaye Wade argued with a “gradualist group” led by South Africa's Thabo Mbeki and Yar’Adua.
Speaking on the heat the AU Government initiative generated, Senegalese Foreign Minister Cheikh Tidiane Gadio said: "I think everybody is a little bit tense, because they know how serious this is. It is getting heated between Gaddafi and the southern Africans.”
While almost all the 53 member nations agree with the goal of African integration and eventual unity, most of the continent's leaders at the summit want this to be a gradual process.
But passions ran high among the proponents of unity, who want a federal government immediately as the only way to fight poverty and myriad other challenges including globalisation.
On this note, the Senegalese Foreign Minister said: "Some of us think that Africa's unity has become a matter of survival... my president is here with his pen ready to sign," Gadio said. He held out the prospect that a small group of states could forge ahead by themselves and sign up to federation.
"If Senegal wants to build this union with two, three, four more countries, there is not a country in this room that has enough power to tell Senegal you cannot do it. Some will start and the others will follow. Now, who is ready to start? Senegal is ready," he said.
Gaddafi, known for his impassioned rhetoric, was more restrained yesterday despite a speech on the summit's eve invoking the spirit of pan-African icon Kwame Nkrumah, who led Ghana to independence 50 years ago, to support his vision of a United States of Africa.
Asked by a crush of journalists during a summit recess whether he was optimistic about unity, Gaddafi, wearing dark glasses and a black cap, declared: "I am always optimistic."
The Libyan leader, describing himself as a soldier for Africa, is impatient with the slow pace of integration. He did not attend the summit's opening session on Sunday and believes the decision over unity must be made by Africa's masses and not leaders closeted in a conference hall.
Kenya's President Mwai Kibaki, a member of the gradualist camp, expressed strong support for unity yesterday.
"The advantages of Africa's unification are enormous for our people. A unified Africa will have stronger bargaining power," he said.
But reflecting the views of many of the leaders, Kibaki added that at a recent conference on the issue in Kenya, "opinions were varied on the pace this process should take".
Kibaki said Africa's eight regional economic communities should be the building blocs of a united continent and their integration must be accelerated.
The summit leaders have come under criticism for largely ignoring pressing issues like Sudan, Somalia and Zimbabwe at this meeting to concentrate on unifying the continent. Many regard this as an unrealistic, if noble, dream. Sceptics point to decades of wars, coups and massacres that often sprang from ethnic and religious fault lines on a continent artificially carved up by former colonial rulers.
 

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I'm going to have to agree completely. Let's focus on creating stronger regional unions-the EAC, the Central African community, ECOWAS, SADC, etc, etc-those are all very close to coming into fruition, and are more realistic to.
Dantexavier, First of all , we have to FOCUS OUR ENEGRGIES ON BUILDING UP STRONG AND VIABLE STATES, how can we think of regional governenace when most of African states are still fragile and financially dirt-poor, it is absurd!

In order to build up strong regional governance, structural, logistical, institutional, psychological, and above all financial aspects are concerneed, who should pay for regional governance when most of the countries are ridden by huge burdens of debts and are still comparatively dreadfully poor???

So in order to build up strong regional governance one needs certain strong anchor countries.

In West africa there is only one country who can carry the union forward financially, namely Nigeria, but Nigeria needs the money for itself for at least the next generation to build up and rehabilitate its material and social infrastructure in all levels of society, so we don´t have any spare money to give away to ther states in the sub-region. In might sound funny, but Nigeria is still far too poor to do this, more than 140 million people soak up a lot of attention and dedication (if addressed adquately).

Nevertheless, in my mind, potential anchor states in West Africa are Ghana, Senegal and Côte d´ivoire, once those states become more wealthy they can push forward regional integration.

Potential anchor states in Central Africa (CEMAC): I am pretty optimistic for this sub-region as far as the financial aspect is concerned, nearly all are oil producers and hold a lot of mining potential and all have (apart from Zaire and Sao Tome& Principe) one regional monetary and well performing policy, and almost all speak and understand one common language easily! On the downside: most governments don´t see themselves as partners but as rivals (take Gabon and Cameroon, every nation wants to get the best out of the juicy pie or between Gabon and Equatorial Guinea, a lot of rivalry between the two states in terms of who wants to be the leader in the sub-region). Other question is Zaire: are Gabon, Cameroon , Equatorial Guinea or Sao Tome and Principe really willing to accept an African Giant in their midts? One that can swiftly swallow up all of them once the nation-state gets on its feet? I doubt it?

In Eastern Africa potential anchor states are undoubtedly Kenya, Sudan and probably Uganda!

In Southern africa, the picture looks "rosy". You get SA as the undisputed regional leader with a lot of capacity, You´ve get Angola developing fast and that will likely overflow with money in the next one to two decades. However, this country will be concerned with (re)construction for the next years to come and it would be absurd if the country thinks about regional integration when a lot of pressing needs are still unadressed at home.



In comparison Europe:

In Europe you had very mighty and financially healthy countries that pushed the European Union forward , namely Germany and France in the early days. Those two countries helped to develop Spain, Portugal, Italy and Greece. These countries have done fairly well by now so they are helping to "develop" the newcomers if Eastern Europe, all this HAS COST HUNDREDS OF BILLIONS OF US DOLLARS and REQUIRED A LOT OF WORK IN HARMONIZING SYSTEMS IN THE FIELD OF LAW, TRADE, ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC POLICIES!

who should shoulder this amount of money in Africa which is a hundred times more complex and disparate than Europe

So energies should be focuused on building strong nation-states (at least a couple of the anchor states mentioned above) for the time being (that means for the next generation at least) ! Regional Governenace comes later!:)
 

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Countries in Africa can barely function properly within their own borders let alone in a regional alliance. It would be an absolute disaster if they tried to work together! Can you imagine the corruption?
 

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The idea itself isnt a bad idea, it's just that it's not time yet.
PERFECT!!! you nailed it right on the head. the idea of streangthening of the regional blocs first is the right way to go plus the steps have already begun. especially in the EAC which is the most advanced bloc, in 2012 its going to be one federal govt and there is already a judicial program running and a legislative assembly running and same currency. for now i do not support a united states of africa.
 
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