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17-04-17
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True, a residential compound does make more sense. I'm already seeing the same mistakes made in other planned cities though. Detached developments right next to big-ass roads. Why would they build a low-density residential complex next to such a wide road?
Well that's what happens when you have a vaste vacant land. They often build the project and leave the rest to the roads rather than investing in the public transit.
 

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Well that's what happens when you have a vaste vacant land. They often build the project and leave the rest to the roads rather than investing in the public transit.
That's not the way to go though. They intended to build a smart city that's accessible, or at least that's what they told us. Egypt's car-dependence is making life difficult for everyone, car owners and pedestrians alike. During rush hour in Alexandria it's faster to walk than it is to drive, but the streets are not designed properly to accommodate pedestrians.
 

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17-04-17
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That's not the way to go though. They intended to build a smart city that's accessible, or at least that's what they told us. Egypt's car-dependence is making life difficult for everyone, car owners and pedestrians alike. During rush hour in Alexandria it's faster to walk than it is to drive, but the streets are not designed properly to accommodate pedestrians.
At the same time what is really better seriously speaking? Splashing billions and billions of dollars into a supposed new capital or rather make Cairo incredibly efficient with public transit with those money? Unfortunately, i don't see the point of a new capital. My guess would've been improving and working on Cairo and Alexandria with those money. Tokyo has always been a city incredibly crowded but capable of absorbing the density through its efficient public transit.
 

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I agree with you, to some degree. The government has allocated a budget for this project that would be better spent improving existing infrastructure to create more efficient and livable cities. It's a form of expansionary fiscal policy intended to spur growth except it's all concentrated in one giant project. But this is also an invitation for foreign investors, a marketing strategy of sorts. The Wallstreet Journal isn't going to write about the government repairing potholes in Cairo, but a new capital definitely makes the headlines. Unfortunately I feel that the momentum has been lost, the investment climate has been marred by a deterioration in freedoms, terrorism and the delay in implementing the reforms promised during the economic conference.

There are many arguments to be made for and against this planned city, but at this point I think it's a reality and we should focus on trying to implement it as well as possible. Walled compounds and giant roads is just the recipe for a bland, boring and car-dependent mess of a city a la Riyadh, not a smart city.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Look at the house prices in Egypt and you'll understand why a new capital is badly needed. We have a housing crisis and our cities are crowded. Infrastructure is old and deteriorating. Do you want to fix up Cairo? Get half the population out first. The population there is out of control, it will double by 2030.

Also, for the millionth time, this is being funded by the private sector, the government isn't paying for anything. Private investors are pouring money into the project in hopes of getting a return on their investment. No one is going to invest in fixing potholes.
 

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We do indeed need to move away from the city and Cairo is crowded, that's why I said there are arguments for and against this development. But this is no longer funded by the private sector, the government has earmarked billions for the project and that's what I'm getting at. Roads, government buildings, public infrastructure, all of it financed by the government. Building in the desert is the only way to prevent the diminution of fertile land along the Nile, but there are pressing issues in Cairo that need to be addressed by authorities as well. Traffic jams for example cause billions of dollars in losses every year, that's not something the private sector will pay for.
 

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17-04-17
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I agree with you, to some degree. The government has allocated a budget for this project that would be better spent improving existing infrastructure to create more efficient and livable cities. It's a form of expansionary fiscal policy intended to spur growth except it's all concentrated in one giant project. But this is also an invitation for foreign investors, a marketing strategy of sorts. The Wallstreet Journal isn't going to write about the government repairing potholes in Cairo, but a new capital definitely makes the headlines. Unfortunately I feel that the momentum has been lost, the investment climate has been marred by a deterioration in freedoms, terrorism and the delay in implementing the reforms promised during the economic conference.

There are many arguments to be made for and against this planned city, but at this point I think it's a reality and we should focus on trying to implement it as well as possible. Walled compounds and giant roads is just the recipe for a bland, boring and car-dependent mess of a city a la Riyadh, not a smart city.
Don't forget the announcement of a new capital at the time during the economic conference largely surprised the investors because none expected it. I also doubt about the quality of urban planning on that project but i highly suppose the government is seeking to build a city because it wants to just like China's economy is doing with those ghost towns. The other factor about this project is how much the success of this project depends on the job opportunity offered in those city exceptionally about the industrial zone in the Suez region. The necessity of job opportunities must be there to be able to see this project succeed and definitely see the rise of an administrative city.

Look at the house prices in Egypt and you'll understand why a new capital is badly needed. We have a housing crisis and our cities are crowded. Infrastructure is old and deteriorating. Do you want to fix up Cairo? Get half the population out first. The population there is out of control, it will double by 2030.

Also, for the millionth time, this is being funded by the private sector, the government isn't paying for anything. Private investors are pouring money into the project in hopes of getting a return on their investment. No one is going to invest in fixing potholes.
Words, the problem is how much the government is allocating the lands to contractors so they can maximize their profit through compounds, golf clubs, commercial centers, etc. You'll never find small-medium houses for the poorer nor you'll ever find cities that will succeed like 10th ramada, 6th october,etc.

But seriously speaking, if the economy goes well with an economic growth that increases the upper class then i believe this project will be incredibly crucial for the country. I mean, Egypt has all it takes to embrace an economic growth but all it needs is the right reforms.

We do indeed need to move away from the city and Cairo is crowded, that's why I said there are arguments for and against this development. But this is no longer funded by the private sector, the government has earmarked billions for the project and that's what I'm getting at. Roads, government buildings, public infrastructure, all of it financed by the government. Building in the desert is the only way to prevent the diminution of fertile land along the Nile, but there are pressing issues in Cairo that need to be addressed by authorities as well. Traffic jams for example cause billions of dollars in losses every year, that's not something the private sector will pay for.
True but to be honest those issues can be tackled if Cairo tackles the issue by expanding the metro service across the region and fighting the amount of microbus and taxis on the streets. As for Alexandria i heard they want to revive the tramway which would be an incredible thing. I've never understood why Cairo and Alexandria never encouraged the concept of T.O.D which is literally transit oriented development that involves new cities connected to the big ones with tramways or subways.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ya, the government is allocating land to them for free but unless they allocate the land, nothing will be built. It's not as if that land is useful at all in its current state. Literally desert.
 

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6th of October and New Cairo are successful projects, but all the developments there cater to the upper class. I don't know if that was intended but if the government wants the new city to be any different they need to make concessions to real estate companies that build lower and middle income residential projects in the form of subsidies or tax cuts. These projects are simply not profitable enough. This is partly the reason why almost all serious real estate projects cater to the upper class, why build 100 units that will sell for LE100,000 each when you can build 10 units that sell for LE1 million each? Subsidize them and maybe working class Egyptians will have a chance to live in legally built apartment towers that adhere to height and safety regulations. Egypt doesn't have a housing crisis, it has an affordable housing crisis. The only difference between a LE1 million and a LE100,000 apartment in Egypt can be location and exterior design, the difference in size and quality isn't always that significant.
 

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17-04-17
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6th of October and New Cairo are successful projects, but all the developments there cater to the upper class. I don't know if that was intended but if the government wants the new city to be any different they need to make concessions to real estate companies that build lower and middle income residential projects in the form of subsidies or tax cuts. These projects are simply not profitable enough. This is partly the reason why almost all serious real estate projects cater to the upper class, why build 100 units that will sell for LE100,000 each when you can build 10 units that sell for LE1 million each? Subsidize them and maybe working class Egyptians will have a chance to live in legally built apartment towers that adhere to height and safety regulations. Egypt doesn't have a housing crisis, it has an affordable housing crisis. The only difference between a LE1 million and a LE100,000 apartment in Egypt can be location and exterior design, the difference in size and quality isn't always that significant.
I was looking at the prices to buy a home in Egypt and i only found prices around 5 million to 10 million EGY!!
 

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I was looking at the prices to buy a home in Egypt and i only found prices around 5 million to 10 million EGY!!
You're looking in the wrong places. For that price you can get a 400m3 villa in one of the best compounds in Egypt. Most decent apartments will hover at around LE1 million, give or take. If you want something in an upper class area add a million or two.
 

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17-04-17
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You're looking in the wrong places. For that price you can get a 400m3 villa in one of the best compounds in Egypt. Most decent apartments will hover at around LE1 million, give or take. If you want something in an upper class area add a million or two.
In that case it's a more reasonable price. But definitely if i had to buy a villa or compound i'd go to Cairo search up by my own.
 

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In that case it's a more reasonable price. But definitely if i had to buy a villa or compound i'd go to Cairo search up by my own.
Lots of options nowadays, I've been looking myself. You definitely want something in New Cairo in that case. 6th of October is nearly one hour away by car and your friends will hate you if you live there. :lol:
 

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Lots of options nowadays, I've been looking myself. You definitely want something in New Cairo in that case. 6th of October is nearly one hour away by car and your friends will hate you if you live there. :lol:
In that case New Cairo will be good but again will depend the location of my work/business. I am yet to decide.
 
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