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City of LA indeed according to available sources.

http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?id=9383393

"LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- An all-time record-breaking 42.2 million people visited the city of Los Angeles last year.

That's the most ever, and a 0.8 increase over 2012.

Local leaders say it's no surprise because L.A. is better than it's ever been.

"The oceans and beaches are cleaner, the weather is awesome, the clubs are jammed, the restaurants are legendary, the Dodgers are back," said Police Commission President Steve Soboroff.

L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti announced the 2013 record set for tourism during a news conference at the Space Shuttle Endeavour exhibit at the California Science Center in Exposition Park Monday.

"If you're not lucky enough to be from L.A., L.A. is your second home, for everybody, around the world - this is everyone's second home," said Garcetti.

Officials said 36 million domestic tourists and 6.2 million international tourists visited Los Angeles in 2013, boosting the city's economy.

"It means billions of dollars have been injected into our economy, that means millions of jobs, that means dollars that are spent in our stores, in our restaurants, in our hotels, in our attractions here in L.A.," said Garcetti.

Attractions like Disneyland, Universal Studios, Venice Beach, and the Space Shuttle Endeavour exhibit drew people from all over the world.

"More than 2.7 million people, last year, went through these doors to see this shuttle - a made in L.A. product," said Garcetti.

Tourism also creates thousands of jobs. Local leaders hope this industry continues to grow in years to come with the addition of more attractions, luxurious hotels, and, with any luck, a football team.

Garcetti says an NFL football team in Los Angeles is still in the works, but will undoubtedly boost tourism."
 

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i want to say City of LA, but its hard to distinguish as someone that comes to LA city will more than likely visit Santa Monica, Bev Hills, Pasadena, WeHo, OC, etc
 

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Silver Lake
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"If you're not lucky enough to be from L.A., L.A. is your second home, for everybody, around the world - this is everyone's second home," said Garcetti.
This is a very stupid statement, LA is not everyone's second home. The talking points regarding attracting tourists would be to present LA as having worked hard in revitalizing itself over the past 10+ years by adding transit, beautifying its already famous and unique neighborhoods, and retaining that what makes it famous, largely its people and natural surroundings. It should be portrayed as a phoenix and a city of constant reinvention where you can come and reinvent yourself as well, if only for a week. Instead of the "what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas" line, LA should be marketed as a place that dull tourists come and become transformed by laying out on its beaches, hiking in the mountains, rubbing shoulders with the "stars" in Hollywood, eating new and exotic food, doing yoga in the mountains ala Runyon Canyon, even driving a convertible. The scene would then follow the tourist back to her/his boring life in Topeka where this person would now be taking back a little bit of the excitement of LA with a better body, more open views and an all-around more fun person to be around, fueling others to want to do the same.

Everyone understands that LA is the sum of its parts. So if we are only looking at visitors to the City of LA, excluding SaMo, BeHi, Pas, OC and the LBC then we are tracking less than half of our visitors.
 

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LA's showcase in the last Rose Parade sums up some of the best attractions.within the city: Walt Disney Concert Hall and the rest of the music venues, LA Lakers and the rest of LA Live, Olvera Street and Chinatown, Space shuttle, Universal City and Griffith Park. Hollywood and Watts are part of LA too, right? Not sure, newbie question.

Other areas I enjoyed visiting are DTLA, from Figueroa to Little Tokyo; Westlake/MacArthur Park, Koreatown, Echo Park, Silver Lake, Atwater Village, Los Feliz, USC, Fairfax District and Miracle Mile, Venice-and all are within Los Angeles City.

I think it is also a good thing that othet cities within the county have something wonderful too for tourists like me. The people who visit Santa Monica, WeHo, Culver City, Long Beach, Glendale, Pasadena etc usually end up spending on the LA city areas as well anyway.

I also like how well connected it is to other places of interest, and there are many cheap options. Ive so far only traveled to SF, Joshua Tree, Palm Springs and North OC but people on an extended stay can easily visit SD/TJ, Vegas, Phoenix, Utah and North California on weekend trips from LA through car rentals, train, bus if planes arent an option.
 

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This is a very stupid statement, LA is not everyone's second home. The talking points regarding attracting tourists would be to present LA as having worked hard in revitalizing itself over the past 10+ years by adding transit, beautifying its already famous and unique neighborhoods, and retaining that what makes it famous, largely its people and natural surroundings. It should be portrayed as a phoenix and a city of constant reinvention where you can come and reinvent yourself as well, if only for a week. Instead of the "what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas" line, LA should be marketed as a place that dull tourists come and become transformed by laying out on its beaches, hiking in the mountains, rubbing shoulders with the "stars" in Hollywood, eating new and exotic food, doing yoga in the mountains ala Runyon Canyon, even driving a convertible. The scene would then follow the tourist back to her/his boring life in Topeka where this person would now be taking back a little bit of the excitement of LA with a better body, more open views and an all-around more fun person to be around, fueling others to want to do the same.

Everyone understands that LA is the sum of its parts. So if we are only looking at visitors to the City of LA, excluding SaMo, BeHi, Pas, OC and the LBC then we are tracking less than half of our visitors.
The "everybody's second home" phrase was not chosen randomly. LA is a city that even those who have never been to it already know a lot about from the media. There is a sense of recognition when you see the beaches, BH homes, Hollywood, City Hall, etc. Generally, about a dozen LA areas are well known throughout the world (as is true for NY, London, Paris). This is not true for Dallas, Chicago, Atlanta, etc.

Capitalizing on this makes a lot of sense. But, all of your points make sense as well, since the variety of possible experiences in LA are quite wide and largely unknown.
 

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This is a very stupid statement, LA is not everyone's second home. The talking points regarding attracting tourists would be to present LA as having worked hard in revitalizing itself over the past 10+ years by adding transit, beautifying its already famous and unique neighborhoods, and retaining that what makes it famous, largely its people and natural surroundings. It should be portrayed as a phoenix and a city of constant reinvention where you can come and reinvent yourself as well, if only for a week. Instead of the "what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas" line, LA should be marketed as a place that dull tourists come and become transformed by laying out on its beaches, hiking in the mountains, rubbing shoulders with the "stars" in Hollywood, eating new and exotic food, doing yoga in the mountains ala Runyon Canyon, even driving a convertible. The scene would then follow the tourist back to her/his boring life in Topeka where this person would now be taking back a little bit of the excitement of LA with a better body, more open views and an all-around more fun person to be around, fueling others to want to do the same.

Everyone understands that LA is the sum of its parts. So if we are only looking at visitors to the City of LA, excluding SaMo, BeHi, Pas, OC and the LBC then we are tracking less than half of our visitors.
Shut up Klamedia. Its just a statement.
 

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Free Cake
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Bump!

Hello you lovely people, I'll be spending about a week-and-a-half in LA later this month. I'll be staying in a new hotel/hostel downtown which looks great and have a few things planned around surf, sun and music. But being an urbanist geek I'm also on the lookout for interesting, buzzing and/or hidden neighbourhoods to explore.

Any suggestions from locals? Bonus points for interesting music/venues I may never have considered. Koreatown, Venice and Echo Park are on my radar. Doesn't have to be completely free of grit, I'm not a prude.
 

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Gosh, where to start. I'm sure others can give more advise.

  • In Downtown I would do the Grand Central Market on Broadway for lunch some day.
  • Olvera Street and Union Station.
  • You can take the Expo Line to Santa Monica Pier.
  • On the weekends, Spring Street in DT is happening.
  • You can take the Red Line to Hollywood & Highland.
  • I would try to make it to the Getty.
Try the Arts District, there are some hidden foodie gems. LA has the best foods of around, especially Latin America and Asian. :cheers:
 

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Downtown:
-Olvera Street/La Placita (L.A.'s oldest street and market)
-Mr Churro (cream-filled churros at Olvera Street)
-L.A. Central Library (also a historic structure that includes the Maguire Gardens)
-The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA Museum (Lil Tokyo)
-The Broad Museum (also neighbors the Walt Disney Concert Hall)
-Skyspace (for city and region views at the top of our tallest skyscraper)
-Santee Alley (a local fashion bazaar popular for bargaining wit retailers)

Koreatown:
-The Wiltern (A live music venue also historic in status as an Art Deco work of art)
-Guelaguetza (One of our most famous restaurants featuring Oaxacan Food)

Venice:
-Venice Beach Boardwalk (plenty here for anyone to do (locals and tourists alike))
-Venice Canals (mostly an uncommon-for-most photo opp area, but it's worth it)

Echo Park:
-Echo Lake (famous in movies and city identity with a service that charges for paddle boating on the lake)
-The Blue Tortilla Lady (really a local thing... A local street vendor that makes authentic Oaxacan blue tortillas by hand and serves quesadillas)
 

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Thank you! Added to the list.
Wait, there's more!

DT: the Fashion Dist. is fascinating for density of businesses M-F and on weekends becomes a Latin American shopping experience. Clothing, flowers, toys, foods. Try along Olympic heading east from about Hill, plus all the side streets. If you are ambitious, there is similar all along 8th for a mile or two and around Alvarado and MacArthur Park.

Check out the downtownla news for lists of what's under construction and remodeling. It really is an urbanist's playground right now. Grand Ave. always has something going on with formal entertainment and 7th St. and Broadway are major areas with lots of change. Bar Ama and Baco Mercat are known for good, innovative cuisine; the Ace Hotel, Freehold Hotel and Standard Hotel have very hip scenes; Clifton's bar is worth a view at least once; the Bradbury Bldg. is worth a view (especially if you liked Blade Runner).

Skid Row is worth a look since you like to see real cities. What happens when there is perfect weather and lax enforcement of laws over a long time. Think about the tension between the street people and those trying to raise families in the area.

Further east, the Arts Dist. has lots of galleries and projects going in; you need a more detailed guide to hit them all, but again it's an urbanist wonderland.

Ktown: lots of little places. I would recommend Escala or any of the Korean restaurants, bars, tea rooms in the same complex on 6th St. and surrounding blocks. Lots of karaoke and hostess bars as well if you want to deep-dive. Be prepared to drink heavily, sing loudly and start short-term relationships.

Go to Griffith observatory and then walk up Mt. Hollywood; great views and you get to see where some of James Deans most famous scenes were filmed. Runyon Canyon is well known for hiking as well.

Check out Hollywood Blvd. and Selma as well where everything is under construction. Clubs, bars, food and general rowdiness. Find Lassie's star and get down on all fours and bark.
 

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A few restaurants to try out while you're here.

Downtown LA

Exchange at Freehand (i think youre staying there) - Mediterranean food
10E - Armenian / Mediterranean Food
Little Sister - Southeast Asian
Bar Ama - Tex Mex
Grand Central Market - All kinds of amazing food
Langers - Greatest pastrami sandwich on earth #17
Howlin Rays - Nashville Hot Chicken - Greatest Sandwich of all time - try to go on wed or thursday around 330 -4, as the line would be the shortest at that time (around an hour)
Little Jewel of New Orleans - Self Explanatory - Cajun sandwiches / market
Bestia - Arts District

Hollywood

Beauty and Essex

Echo Park / Silver Lake

Night and Song Market - Thai, street food style
Jitlada - Thai, restaurant style

Koreatown

Kong ho Dong - Must have Korean BBQ - Pork Bulgogi and marinated short rib are a must
Genwa - Another great Korean BBQ

Glendale

Raffis Kabob - Fantastic Persian food
 

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Skid Row is worth a look since you like to see real cities. What happens when there is perfect weather and lax enforcement of laws over a long time. Think about the tension between the street people and those trying to raise families in the area.
He forgot to mention that law enforcement and hospitals had been dumping people there since before 2000. You'll probly come across more lax law enforcement at Venice.
 

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Hey guys, is it possible to go on one of the skyscrapers in the Downtown?
I have read that you can go free on City hall, and there are some notes about going to Bank tower (it's also a video)?
Yes, it is free to go up to the observation deck of City Hall, enter the building through the back entrance (Main St.), go through a quick security check/scanner, show your ID at the desk and they will give you a "VISITOR" sticker to put on. It is closed on weekends.

The Library Tower and the new Wilshire Grand have observation decks with bars etc. I believe there is a fee.
 
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