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· The hopeful traveler
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello all,

I have been seeing all sorts of one photo of a day for this country and that country and I’ve got to say each of those threads have been astounding. I decided to start a thread on the USA and show a couple bits of each state. They may be urban pictures or nature pictures and I hope they are of an area that you may not have seen before.

Here is what I will do: I will post five photos of the day’s state with a brief description. The majority of the shots will not be mine so they will also have the photographers name at the bottom.

Today we will start with the state of Maine:


The State of Maine (IPA: /ˈmeɪn/) is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States of America. The territory that is now Maine was at one time a part of Massachusetts. Maine is the northernmost portion of New England. It is known for its scenery — its jagged, mostly rocky coastline, its low, rolling mountains, and its heavily forested interior — as well as for its seafood cuisine, especially lobsters and clams.

The original inhabitants of the territory that is now Maine were Algonquian-speaking peoples. The first European settlement in Maine was in 1604 by a French party. The first English settlement in Maine, the short-lived Popham Colony, was established by the Plymouth Company in 1607. A number of English settlements were established along the coast of Maine in the 1620s, although the rugged climate, deprivations, and Indian attacks wiped out many of them over the years. As Maine entered the 18th century only a half dozen settlements still survived. American and British forces contended for Maine's territory during the American Revolution and the War of 1812. Because it was physically separated from the rest of Massachusetts (properly speaking, the Department of Maine was an exclave of Massachusetts) and because it was growing in population at a rapid rate, Maine became the 23rd state on March 15, 1820 as a component of the Missouri Compromise.
(From Wikipedia)

Leonard's Mills, in Bradley, Maine

By shrike1964

Set on 400 acres in the Penobscot County town of Bradley, Leonard’s Mills is a reconstructed logging and milling community of the 1790s.


Portland Head Lighthouse, Fort Williams, Cape Elizabeth, Maine.

By Ed Karjala

Portland Head Lighthouse was built in 1791. Commissioned by George Washington and dedicated by the Marquis de Lafayette, it is the state's oldest lighthouse and one of its most beloved, with a well-appointed museum in the former keeper's house. It sits in Fort Williams Park, off Shore Road in Cape Elizabeth.


Union street from Maine street downtown Bangor.

By Lawrence Whittemore

The British-American settlement which became Bangor was started in 1769 by Jacob Buswell, and was originally known as Condeskeag Plantation. It later became known as the Lumber Capital of America and still is exporting lumber throughout the United States of America and even to the United Kingdom.

Just one of the many churches in Bangor

By Lawrence Whittemore

Acadia National Park

By shrike1964

Acadia National Park preserves much of Mount Desert Island, and associated smaller islands, off the Atlantic coast of Maine. The area includes mountains, an ocean shoreline, woodlands, and lakes. In addition to Mount Desert Island, the park comprises much of the Isle au Haut, a small island to the southwest of Mount Desert Island and parts of Baker Island, also nearby.
 

· The hopeful traveler
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145 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)

· The hopeful traveler
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145 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
We are going to first move throughout the New England area, so today’s state is will be New Hampshire:


New Hampshire (IPA: /nuːˈhæmpʃər/) is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States of America named after the southern English county of Hampshire. The state ranks 44th in land area, 46th in total area of the 50 states, and 41st in population. It became the first post-colonial sovereign nation in the Americas when it broke off from Great Britain in January 1776, and was one of the original thirteen States that founded the United States of America six months later. It was the ninth state to ratify the United States Constitution, bringing that document into effect. New Hampshire was the first U.S. state to have its own state constitution, and is the only state with neither a general sales tax nor a personal income tax. (From Wikipedia)

Franconia Notch State Park

By Debbie T

This state park is noted for its many sites including Flume gorge and the famous “Old Man” of the mountain, a naturally occurring rock face that has a slight resemblance of an old man’s face.

Old Man of the Mountains

By Jeff Wignall

This is the famous Old Man of the Mountains (aka Old Stone Face) that looked down on Profile Lake in Franconia Notch, New Hampshire for thousands of years. The great stone face came crashing to the valley floor on May 3, 2003 after a very tough winter.

Portsmouth New Hampsire

By Mnirishman

Portsmouth New Hampshire has been a historic village since 1623 where it had undergone many names changes until it had settled upon the current name in 1653, the name Portsmouth was adopted in honor of the colony's founder, John Mason. Portsmouth continues to be a major seaport for the state and includes the Portsmouth Naval Base where the Atlantic coast submarines go for major repair.

Portsmouth Tug Boats

By Jason Meserve

A variety of ships move into and out of the harbor including a myriad of fishing boats, various rusty barges, some smaller cargo ships, and the odd submarine.

Stark, New Hampshire

By Kruhme

Like most upper northern states, there are very few large cities, but lots of smaller towns and villages and it isn’t until you go a slight bit more south before you see the larger cities like Boston or New York city.
 

· The hopeful traveler
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Now we will move on to a state known for it’s forests, mountains, cheese, maple syrup, and surprisingly a certain ice cream company: Vermont


Vermont (IPA: /vɜrˈmɒnt/) is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States of America. The state ranks 45th by total area, and 43rd by land area at 9,250 square miles (24,000 km²), and has a population of 608,827, making it the second least populous state (second only to Wyoming). The only New England state with no coastline along the Atlantic Ocean, Vermont is notable for the Green Mountains in the west and Lake Champlain in the northwest. It is bordered by Massachusetts to the south, New Hampshire to the east, New York to the west, and the Canadian province of Quebec to the north.

Originally inhabited by Native American tribes (Abenaki, and Iroquois), the territory that is now Vermont was claimed by France but became a British possession after France's defeat in the French and Indian War. For many years, the surrounding colonies disputed control of the area, especially New Hampshire and New York. Settlers who held land titles granted by these colonies were opposed by the Green Mountain Boys militia, which eventually prevailed in creating an independent state. Vermont became the 14th state to join the United States, following a 14-year period during and after the Revolutionary War as the independent Vermont Republic.
(From Wikipedea)

Vermont Cows Having Fun!

By jody9

An important and growing part of Vermont's economy is the manufacture and sale of artisan foods, fancy foods, and novelty items trading in part upon the Vermont "brand" which the state manages and defends. Examples of these specialty exports include Cabot Cheese, the Vermont Teddy Bear Company, Fine Paints of Europe, Vermont Butter and Cheese Company, several micro breweries, ginseng growers, Burton Snowboards, Lake Champlain Chocolates, King Arthur Flour, and Ben and Jerry's Ice Cream.

Vermont Barn

By jgrantmac

Battery Park - Burlington, Vermont

By slidewayze

Burlington is the largest city in Vermont with a population of 38,889, yet it is not the capital city of Vermont.

Over Looking Montpelier

By SirStan

Overlooking view from the recently repaired Cliff Street that overlooks the city of Montpelier, and heads to Hubbard Park.

Cliff Street Local Traffic Only

By SirStan

Montpelier is considered the smallest state capital in the Union with only a population of 8,035. Driving through it you feel like it is more a village then a city and state capital, yet don’t blink when you are driving by or you might miss it!
 

· The hopeful traveler
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
We’re going to move onto another New England state, a state that some would say is the heart of New England: Massachusetts.


The Commonwealth of Massachusetts (IPA: /ˌmæsəˈtʃuːsɨts/) is a state located in the New England region of the northeastern United States. Most of its population of 6.4 million live in the Boston metropolitan area. The eastern half of this relatively small state is mostly urban and suburban. The west is primarily rural, also with most of its population in urban enclaves. Massachusetts is the most populous of the six New England states and ranks third in overall population density among the 50 states.

Massachusetts has been significant throughout American history. Plymouth, Massachusetts, was the second permanent English settlement in North America. Colonists from England founded many towns and villages in the present-day territory of Massachusetts very early in the nation's history in the 1620s and 1630s. The Boston area became known as the "Cradle of Liberty" for the ferment there which led to the American Revolution and the independence of the United States from Great Britain. Massachusetts was the first U.S. state to abolish slavery and was a center of the temperance movement and abolitionist activity in the years leading to the American Civil War. The state has contributed many prominent politicians to national service, including the Kennedy family.

Originally dependent on agriculture and trade with Europe, Massachusetts was transformed into a manufacturing center during the Industrial Revolution. Migration of factories to the lower-wage Southern states caused economic stagnation during the first half of the 20th century. The Massachusetts economy was revived after World War II, and today is prominent in higher education, health care, and high technology.
(From Wikipedea)

Boston - Marshall Street

By wallyg

Thomas Marshall was a shoemaker, a selectman, and the ferryman for the Charlestown ferry. In 1652, he donated the land for Marshall Street as a shortcut between Union and Hanover Streets. Meanwhile, Joshua Scottow developed his marshland into a commercial dock. Over the years, other Boston streets were widened, but these narrow 17th century lanes created by Marshall and Scottow have remained unchanged.

Bancroft Tower, Worcester MA

By Troy B Thompson

From the plaque at the base of the tower: “Bancroft Tower, This tower was built in 1900 to honor the memory of George Bancroft, 1800-1891. born at the foot of this hill, he rose to the posts of Secretary of the Navy, founder of the U.S. Naval Academy Annapolis Maryland, U.S. Minister to Great Briton and Germany. This memorial was built by his friend and admirer Stephen Salisbury III.”

Rockport Massachusetts

By freefotouk

Every morning, the lobster fleet of Rockport go out to either retrieve of lay lobster traps. New England lobsters are shipped throughout the country and even some parts of the world!

Fort Independence

By rnolan1087

Fort Independence, located on Castle Island, helped protect the Boston harbor.

Cambridge, Massachusetts

By Anil Suri

Cambridge, Massachusetts is a city in the Greater Boston area. It was named in honor of the University of Cambridge in England. Cambridge is most famous for the two prominent universities that call it home: Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
 

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Excellent photos of these States I really love historic buildings , but is it necessary to follow an orden?
..Because despite the fact that the thread has been ''opened'' recently nobody has uploaded photos from west states.It's only a note. ;)

Regards! :D
 

· The hopeful traveler
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145 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Excellent photos of these States I really love historic buildings , but is it necessary to follow an orden?
..Because despite the fact that the thread has been ''opened'' recently nobody has uploaded photos from west states.It's only a note. ;)

Regards! :D
I am slowly making my way that way. If you would like to add photos of the west, send them to me in a pm with the name of who took them, where they were taken, and a brief description and I'll add them to that state when I get there.

My plan is to move down the east coast, then move onto the mid west, south west, then the west coast.

Have patience, we will get to the west coast, but we have a lot of other states to see first.
 
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