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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Post pics and info on basically any building where there are a lot of seats facing in one direction.

Wait, apart from stadiums. Actually, also stadiums, but only during concerts.

Show the inside and out.



I only have this photo now, and it's not the best, of the Vic Arts Centre spire and Hamer Hall.

by me





and if this is a bad forum, or it has already been done, sorry. (i've only been on this forum for 3 days:tongue3:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
wow, if the adelaide convention centre and the adelaide festival centre had a child together, i really think it would turn out to be the melbourne convention centre (new one)
 

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The AFC looks okay at night but during the day I am not too fond of it. The plaza NEEDS a makeover indeed. Wasted potential at the moment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The AFC looks okay at night but during the day I am not too fond of it. .
I agree. The first time that i saw it i thought it was temporary, but i didn't really mind it. it has, in my opinion, become sort of an icon for adelaide, and at night it looks like a completely diffrent building.
 

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http://www.arts.vic.gov.au/content/...tal_Centre_and_Melbourne_Theatre_Company.aspx

The Melbourne Recital Centre and Melbourne Theatre Company


Melbourne Recital Centre and Melbourne Theatre Company
© Peter Glenane/Major Projects Victoria 2008


Melbourne's newest cultural attractions, the two striking new buildings on the corner of Sturt Street and Southbank Boulevard, set new standards in theatre and music presentation. The complex, which opened in early 2009, will enhance and develop Melbourne's reputation as a major centre for arts and culture in Australia. Masterpieces of design and construction the buildings form a key part of the Brumby's government's plan to develop Southbank as an unparalleled arts precinct for Melbourne.

Melbourne Theatre Company's new building comprises the 500 seat theatre Sumner Theatre and more intimate Lawler Studio for small-scale works.

Melbourne Recital Centre (MRC) also comprises two main performance spaces. The 1,000 seat Dame Elisabeth Murdoch Hall and 150 seat Salon. The spaces achieve extraordinary standards in acoustic excellence. To eliminate external noise, the building is surrounded by 250mm of concerete, mounted on 38 steel springs. The interiors are lined with hand-cut panels of native Australian Hoop Pine.

The landmark buildings offer spacious foyers, online and in person box-office faciltiies, cafes and bars.

The Recital Centre and Melbourne Theatre Company buildings are the result of a $128 million collaborative project between the Victorian Government (Major Projects Victoria and Arts Victoria), together with architects Ashton Raggat McDougall, Arup (acoustic design) and Bovis Lend Lease (construction).




Renders:




 

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sidney_Myer_Music_Bowl

http://www.theartscentre.com.au/discover/spaces-and-places/sidney-myer-music-bowl.aspx

Sidney Myer Music Bowl
Kings Domain, Melbourne

The Sidney Myer Music Bowl is an outdoor performance venue in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. It is located in the gentle undulating lawns and gardens of Kings Domain, quite close to the Victorian Arts Centre and the Southbank entertainment precinct. It was officially opened by Prime Minister Robert Menzies on February 12, 1959 with an audience of some 30,000 people.
The Sidney Myer Music Bowl is listed on the Victorian Heritage Register.

Set in the Kings Domain Gardens this hugely popular summertime venue hosts everything from Summerdayze to the surf grooves of Jack Johnson, from the rock of Pearl Jam to the sounds of Dame Kiri Te Kanawa to the vibe of The Asian Dub Foundation.

It is also home to Carols by Candlelight and MSO’s free summertime concert series.

Design and construction

The Bowl's canopy consists of a thin membrane made out of half an inch weather-proofed plywood sheeted on both sides with aluminium attached to a cobwebbed frame of steel cables and supported by 21.3 metre masts pivoted to the earth. The total area of the canopy is 4055 square metres. The main cable at the edge of the canopy comprises 7 ropes, each about 9 cm in diameter and 173 metres long, anchored deep into the ground in concrete blocks. Longitudinal cables hold up the roof and transverse cables hold it down.

Project design was by Yuncken Freeman Architects and Griffiths and Simpson during 1956. The project architect was Barry Patten. Construction commenced in 1958 with an innovative system of cables laced together and covered with aluminium faced plywood sandwich panels. To ensure the structure would be watertight yet aerodynamically stable and flexible, new construction techniques were developed. Ground anchors were required to be corrosion resistant. The shell also needed to be acoustically correct. Construction entailed input from a number of engineering and scientific organisations including the Aeronautical Research Laboratories and CSIRO Forest Products Division.

Unlike the Hollywood Bowl concrete shell structure in Los Angeles which inspired it, the Sidney Myer Music Bowl combined a tensile structural system with a free-form roof. The structural design predates by nearly ten years noted German architect/engineer, Frei Otto, and his experiments in using lightweight tensile and membrane structures. Frei Otto's design of Munich's acclaimed Olympic Park for the 1972 Olympics, and the temporary West German pavilion at the 1967 World's Fair in Montreal, Canada, were heavily influenced by Patten's design of Melbourne's Myer Music Bowl.

History

The businessman and philanthropist, Sidney Myer, inspired the construction of the building, after attending the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles. A violinist who enjoyed music, Sidney Myer established free, open-air concerts with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra in 1929, which were always well attended by Melburnians. These free concerts continue to this day, now being held at the bowl itself. There are usually four or five concerts a year.

Upon his death in 1934, the Sidney Myer Charitable Trust was established, now known as the Myer Foundation, to continue the tradition of philanthropy begun by its founder. The design and construction of a music bowl for the people of Melbourne was decided upon and funded by the Myer Foundation.

The bowl was officially opened by Prime Minister Robert Menzies on February 12, 1959 with an audience of 30,000. Later that month over 70,000 people attended to hear the American evangelist, Billy Graham. In 1966 and 1967, The Seekers performed with an audience of 150,000 and 200,000 respectively. Since then, international performers have included: ABBA, AC/DC, Metallica, Wings, Blondie, The Beach Boys, Crowded House, Dire Straits, Neil Diamond, Bob Dylan, the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Merle Haggard, Pearl Jam, The Seekers, R.E.M., Dame Kiri Te Kanawa, Red Hot Chili Peppers, and most recently Bon Jovi.

During the mid 1970s performances by Billy Thorpe and the Aztecs drew crowds extending into the trees of Kings Domain of over 200,000 and 250,000 people. While most were unable to see the stage, the unique design of "The Bowl" allowed the sound to be heard several kilometres back.

In 1980 administration of the bowl was handed over to the Victorian Arts Centre from the Myer Foundation by Kenneth Myer, Sidney Myer's son. In 1984 a temporary ice-skating rink was created on the Bowl’s stage for use during winter months. The venue was closed for a major renovation in 2000 to bring the facilities up to an appropriate standard, and was reopened by the Premier of Victoria, Steve Bracks, at Carols by Candlelight on Christmas Eve, 2002. Recent works on the lawns extending from the seating and stage, and the construction of a fence and gates has reduced the total capacity to a little over 30,000, however, has also improved the visibility and standard of facilities out of sight.

The Sidney Myer Music Bowl is registered on the Victorian Heritage list for its cultural importance to Victoria; its architectural importance as the largest, purpose built, permanent outdoor performance venue in Australia; and its engineering experimentation in new forms of construction involving use of membranes and a tensile structural system.

Postcard of Sidney Myer Music Bowl built in 1958-59 commanding an elevated site in Kings Domain.



A more recent photograph taken by Takver.



Aerial view of The Myer Music Bowl in the Kings Domain.

 

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Royal Exhibition Building
Carlton Gardens, Melbourne.

From Walking Melbourne
The National Trust guide to the historic and architectural landmarks of central Melbourne.

This is Australia’s first World Heritage listed building, added in 2004 because it is one of the most important survivors of the great exhibitions of the 19th century. Built for an International Exhibition in 1880, the main hall, with a dome reminiscent of Florence Cathedral, is the oldest such hall, and the only one built for industrial goods remaining in the world. Designed by Joseph Reed and Partner Barnes, the Hall and the gardens are all that remain of a vast complex of permanent and temporary annexes that once extended far to the north.
A second, much larger Centennial Exhibition was held in 1888, and the first Australian Federal Parliament was inaugurated here with much ceremony in 1901. Since then the buildings have managed to maintain a central role in Melbourne life, surviving calls to demolish it as a ‘white elephant’.
The western annexe housed State Parliament from 1901-1927 (while federal Parliament occupied Parliament House), and later the Motor Registration Board.
The Eastern Annexe housed a ballroom, a war museum, and an aquarium, while the space between the annexes was occupied by a velodrome and sports oval, used for St. Patrick’s day fairs, then a WWII Army Barracks, later re-used as a migrant camp.
The main building hosted ‘monster’ balls, concerts, and fetes up to WWI, was used as a hospital during the 1919 influenza epidemic, and after WWII was home to ever popular Home, Car and Boat Shows (and High School exams).
It is now part of the Museum of Victoria. Unattractive extensions of the 1950s/60s that had replaced the earlier annexes were demolished in 1999, and the spectacular interior repainted in the ornate 1901 colour scheme.
It continues to host trade, art and flower shows, conferences and parties.
The gardens, flanking the building to the north and south, with their grand tree-lined leading, were designed to complement it, and include notable elements such as the fabulous Hochgurtel Fountain at the south entrance, and the French Fountain and Westgarth Drinking Fountain at the east.

The Royal Exhibition Building in all its splendour


Under construction.


Drawing of REB with all its annexes.
How it would have looked in 1888.


Edwardian postcard of REB


Aerial of REB and Carlton Gardens showing former oval.


The Royal Exhibition Building ~ 1940s.


Another postcard of The Royal Exhibition Building ~ 1960s.


REB with annexes from 1960s and 1980s before removal to clear land for new museum and restoration of north side of the REB.


A recent photograph I've taken of the REB. :D


The fountain at the southern entrance of The Royal Exhibition Building is known as ‘The Hochgurtel Fountain’ after its creator.


Recent postcard of REB at night.


The breathtaking interior of The Royal Exhibition Building.


Old photograph of interior with former organ.
 

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Text from Walking Melbourne
The National Trust guide to the historic and architectural landmarks of central Melbourne

Her Majesty’s Theatre
199-219 Exhibition Street, Melbourne.

Designed by Nahum Barnet, it opened as the Alexandra Theatre in 1886 (the same year as the Princess). The name became Her Majesty’s in 1900 when Australia’s dominant theatrical firm J C Williamson’s assumed control of the theatre. After a disastrous fire, the auditorium and lobbies were rebuilt in 1934 in an elegant and sumptuous Art Deco style designed by theatre specialists C N Hollinshed & A H Walkley – the dress circle lounge featured walnut paneling, inlaid with pewter and ebony and a metallic finish ceiling. In 2002 it was extensively refurbished by the new owner Mike Walsh, former TV personality and now theatre impresario.



Above and the next two below, Her Majesty’s (Alexandra) Theatre in all its past glory.







Above, an old sign on the corner of Bourke and Exhibition Streets for Her Majesty’s and below a recent shot I took showing façade detail.

 

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Text from Walking Melbourne
The National Trust guide to the historic and architectural landmarks of central Melbourne

Princess Theatre
163-181 Spring Street, Melbourne.

The first theatre on this site opened in 1854, and the present theatre was designed by William Pitt for the theatrical entrepreneurs Williamson Garner & Musgrove, and opened in 1886 with the Australian premier of The Mikado. It is considered an exemplar of the French Second Empire style, complete with multiple mansard domed roofs topped by cast iron crowns; the delightful leadlight windowed ‘winter garden’ foyer at the first floor was added in c1901 and the auditorium was rebuilt in 1922 in the ‘Adam’ style by theatre specialist Henry White. Facing an uncertain future in the 1980s, it was extensively restored in 1989 by Allom Lovell & Associates, and is now the Flagship of Melbourne’s ‘theatreland’. The Princess backs onto the rear of the former Palace Theatre, giving rise to the urban rumour that chorus girls would appear in one show, then run across the back lane to appear in another!



Princess Theatre, above and below, before balconies were filled in to create the ‘winter garden’ foyer in 1901.




An old aerial.

Four of my own below.









Princes Theatre at night.

 

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Text from Walking Melbourne
The National Trust guide to the historic and architectural landmarks of central Melbourne

Former State Theatre (now Forum)
150-162 Flinders Street, corner Russell Street, Melbourne

This wildly exotic structure, replete with an ‘Arabian nights’ façade and onion domed tower, was the flagship of the Union Theatre chain and was Australia’s largest silent era picture palace, seating 3370.
Executed by the local architects Bohringer Taylor & Johnson, the design was provided by American theatre specialist John Eberson in his distinctive ‘atmospheric’ style, where the interior is designed to give the impression of a walled Florentine garden, complete with artificial night sky studded with stars, surrounded by statuary (mainly sent out from Eberson’s Boston workshop).
It was built in a race with the equally sumptuous Regent Theatre in Collins Street, and opened first by three and a half weeks in February 1929. Renamed the Forum in 1962 when the balcony was subdivided off to form a second cinema, it became a Revivalist Church in the 1980s, and in the late 1990s became a mixed entertainment venue.

How it looked in the 1930s.



The Forum at night.



Several shots of my own.







 

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Main body of text from Melbourne Architecture
Philip Goad

Palais Theatre
Lower Esplanade, St Kilda, Victoria.

1927 Henry E White

Built on the site of another theatre/cinema, the design of which was widely attributed to Walter Burley Griffin, the new Palais was described by the Argus in 1927 as the largest and most beautiful theatre in the country. Seating 2968 people, the ‘French and Oriental style’ interior was indeed vast. Features of the interior were the open wells in the upper foyer and an elliptical one over the back stalls. In recent years, the Palais has been the venue for a wide variety of events, scout gang shows, rock concerts, architects’ award nights and even the odd film festival.

Before the current Palais Theatre, there were two versions of the Palais Pictures.

In the postcard below we see the original Palais Pictures (1914) in the center, flanked by Luna Park and Palais De Danse.



In 1922, while work commenced on the Capital Theatre, Walter Burley Griffin began designing a remodelled Palais Pictures. Construction of Griffin's plans began in 1925, but a spectacular fire engulfed the stage in February 1926, just before completion, bringing a halt to work.

When the Griffins moved on to Sydney, the developers commissioned a new architect, Henry E. White, to build the larger, more grand Palais Theatre.

Photo of the renovated Palais Pictures, just before the fire.



Add featuring the new Palais Theatre/Pictures.



The Palais Theatre built on the former old Palais Pictures site in all its glory.


Photo by MattDoc.

The stage.



Aerial of the St Kilda triangle featuring the Palais Theatre.

 

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Text from Melbourne Architecture

Capitol Theatre
109-117 Swanston Street, Melbourne.
1921-24 Walter Burley Griffin and Marion Mahony in association with Peck and Kemter.

When this cinema opened in 1924, the public flocked to hear the Wurlitzer organ and see the movies and the spectacular light show afforded by the Griffin’s plaster ceiling design. Like a crystal-hung cave, thousands of concealed coloured lights were gradually illuminated to provide a fantastic atmospheric experience. It was a space that evoked spiritual transcendence, but the interior of ‘living rock’ was not the direct romantic evocation of a Tuscan garden as seen in the later Forum. It was certainly otherworldly, but the image was distinctly architectural, suggesting a stepped pyramid form, the mystical essence of an original and arguably natural monument.
The Capitol was also of technical interest, to achieve such a dramatic ceiling, massive reinforced concrete portals allowed the interior structure to be hung uninterrupted by any internal columns. Outside, the Capitol is also distinctive. Two deep cornices cap two pylon motifs each of three vertical piers extending over the entire height of the façade. It is, as historian Jeffrey Turnbull has suggested, like a giant gateway. Cinema historian Ross Thorne has described it as, ‘…not a mere breath of fresh air wafting through the design offices of Melbourne, it was a howling gale of modernity sweeping out every vestige of revivalist decorative stylism.’
Tragically, in the 1960s, the owners decided to insert a shopping arcade right through the middle of the auditorium. A campaign to save the theatre was waged and a compromise was reached: the cave-like foyers were destroyed and a new floor was inserted. Many of the original lobby and vestibule spaces were either destroyed or boarded up, but the ceiling was saved. In recent years, great efforts have been made to restore surviving elements of the theatre. The dramatic cantilevering street canopy with its light globes and skylights is the most significant recent restoration.


One of my own shots above and two postcards below.



The incredible interior.



These three images below show the original ground floor that was demolished in the 1960s to make way for a very ordinary shopping arcade that leads to Howey Place.





 

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Text from Walking Melbourne
The National Trust guide to the historic and architectural landmarks of central Melbourne

Regent Theatre
191-197 Collins Street, Melbourne.

Melbourne’s grandest ‘Picture Palace’ was designed by Cedric H Ballantyne, drawing heavily on American cinema design, for F T Thring’s Hoyts Theatres, and was built in competition with the equally huge State Theatre (now the Forum). Opening just 3 1/2 weeks after the State in March 1929, the interior includes a Medieval Spanish style foyer, dripping with ornamentation and crowned by a painted ceiling, contrasted with a sumptuous Versailles Palace style auditorium (originally seating 3250), complete with an enormous crystal chandelier. A second cinema, the gorgeous Spanish Baroque style Plaza Theatre was built in the basement. The Regent is a remarkable survivor, and a testament to popular affection – following a disastrous fire in 1947, the auditorium was completely rebuilt in the original style, and after the last film was shown in 1971, it lay empty, surviving demolition threats for 25 years (with the help of union bans and the National Trust) until it was finally restored by Allom Lovell & Associates as a live theatre for David Marriner in 1996.

The Regent Theatre as originally built, with the Plaza below.



The Regent Theatre on the left in January 1964.



Interior of the Regent Theatre.



Below, two shots of my own.



 
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