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There is quite an interesting looking render on page 36 which shows the railway station and plans for redevelopment of Sheaf Square. It shows tram tracks in front of the station and a roof with a bridge over said roof. It's quite an interesting looking render; it'd be great to have Sheaf Square finally complete
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
A couple of things that stand out for me is the downsizing of Pond Street bus station to hopefully be replaced by offices, a business district running down and including Sheaf Sq, and getting The Square finished.
There is even a mention to get the passageway at the bottom of the Moor reopened to link the Moor with Ecclesall Rd.
 

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The document looks like a Speedkill wet dream!! - were you involved in its production? - but Tbf lots and lots to like in this document.
The things that look really good to me are the corridor of business from the riverside to the CIQ, fronting the station and going into the centre - makes a lot of sense to me to make commuting easier.
I love the castlegate concept, heart of the city 2 is a big improvement in the initial great plans - apart from no indoor mall -makes a lot of sense with more offices and housing with retailers struggling.
Really like the green emphasis - surely more trams please utilising wind farm produced energy and no pollution at the point of delivery in the city centre.
Emphasis on a dense urban core to reduce the carbon footprint makes sense.
The big surprise is the station plans, ring road behind the station, the tram in front of station and the bridge!! - love it!!
Looks a great plan all in all - hope it comes to fruition!!
 

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The document looks like a Speedkill wet dream!! - were you involved in its production?
Haha... I wish. I would have gone way further than the council.

Nothing they're suggesting here is even that surprising or controversial. Pretty much every other major city in the country is planning to do the same things. The focus on air quality, cycling, city centre living, sustainable energy etc. is all pretty much standard modern urbanism. Everything else they're suggesting is just a reaction to changing living preferences that have happened in spite of the council, e.g. massive amounts of student flats in St Vincents and non-student housing in Kelham-Neepsend. The council are simply reacting to these trends (many years too late, imo).

The only thing I'm really genuinely excited about is the workplace parking levy. It's been incredibly successful in Nottingham and has lead to a significant reduction in driving to work and a huge amount of funding for public transport. A mixture of the funds raised by the levy and a government grant has allowed them to extend their tram network, which is something we should be screaming for in Sheffield. It's a damn shame the council has shown almost no interest in this in recent years. Our tram system hasn't changed at all since 1995, which is just ridiculous. Whilst I love the tram, we have the most stagnant modern network in the entire country. I mean, how many lines has Manchester opened up in the past 10 years?

Anyway, I'm mostly happy with what the council are proposing here. There's nothing too ambitious and nothing outright dreadful. It's a sensible, subtle, economically reasonable approach to the next 10 years. I wish they could be more ambitious, but I'm well aware that they simply don't have the money for it (and probably never will).
 

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^^ It will have taken a while to put together I'm sure. It doesn't have to be bang up to date as it's only a draft strategy at this stage for Pubic Consultation. They'll have to tweak it to incorporate changes that may arise following that consultation.
Although this document has to dovetail into the city wide Local Plan that I believe all Local Planning authorities are now obliged by Government to produce, effectively this city centre plan is the replacement document for the 'Revised City Centre Masterplan' which itself was published in draft in 2013, consulted upon, then never ratified; probably because of uncertainty over the city the economy following the financial crisis, the uncertainty at the time over the HS2 station location, and the fact that Hammerson were still string everyone along 'assurances' that NRQ would still go ahead...at some indeterminate point.

Let's hope this plan doesn't stay unratified for 5 years!
 

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The apostrophe in this case does not follow basic grammar rules. Normally you'd use an apostrophe to indicate possession, eg Sheffield's city centre. "It's city centre should logically follow the same rule but it doesn't. It's an easy mistake to make. My mind doesn't boggle about the fact that the grammar on a Twitter post isn't perfect
 

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Just a reminder that the public consultation on this finishes on 17 June. There is a last chance to see the city centre plan exhibition at Terminal Warehouse (OVO), Victoria Quays, from tomorrow to Friday (times not stated on the Council website). Downloads of the high- and low-res versions of the plan, as well as a link to the online consultation, are at https://www.sheffield.gov.uk/citycentreplan Council staff are in attendance at the exhibition to deal with questions and perhaps note down comments.
 

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Not really sure which thread to put this into,

The long awaited plan – renamed the Sheffield Plan – won’t be completed and published until September 2023.

Officers say the document has been delayed because of government policies. There will also need to be extensive consultation on a draft version, plus recommendations from inspectors, before a final version can be drawn up.

Simon Vincent, Local Plan service manager, says in a report that once published, the plan will cover the period 2023-2038.


He says: “The previous version of the Local Development Scheme, published in July 2016, allowed for three public consultation periods and envisaged adoption of the Local Plan by September 2018.


“Since the publication of that previous LDS, it has been necessary to take account of the Government’s Housing White Paper and subsequent changes to national planning policy and guidance.

“Officers have also been working with members to develop a new vision for how the city could develop in the future, set against the context of the updated National Planning Policy Framework.

“The previous LDS is now clearly out of date. It remains important to note that the council is some way off developing its draft plan at this stage.”

The timescale is:


July to September 2020

A new consultation on the draft Local Plan

July 2021

After all representations are considered, work will start on producing the draft Local Plan


July to September 2021

Consultation on the draft Local Plan will take place

January 2022

The draft Local Plan will be submitted to Government


April to July 2022

There will be a number of public hearings

November 2022

The Inspector’s preliminary report on the draft plan is published


January to February 2023

Consultation on any main modifications to the draft if required, including the Inspector’s recommendations

June 2023

The final Inspector’s report is expected to be published

September 2023

Cabinet approval and adoption by full council

One key area already highlighted is central Sheffield and the city centre.

Mr Vincent adds: “As part of developing the vision for the city, officers intend to undertake further engagement with landowners, agents, developers and local residents about the scope for redevelopment in the central area of Sheffield, covering the city centre and the areas fringing the centre. This will take place later this year.

“One of the main objectives of this will be to explore the potential for additional housing development in those areas.

“The recent declaration of the climate emergency, and commitment to targeting rapid decarbonisation over the plan period, adds impetus to the need to secure sustainable sites for housing growth in the city.

“A stronger focus on the central area would potentially support lower carbon living through densification of land uses, provision of more efficient buildings and encouraging sustainable travel through improved alignment of residential and employment land.”
https://www.thestar.co.uk/news/poli...ocal-plan-wont-be-published-four-years-820871
 
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