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Tokyo's Metro

Tokyo's Metro
Not to be mistakened for the operator ''Tokyo Metro''. By metro I am referring to private urban rail lines, JR East lines, Tokyo Metro subway lines etc etc...
- How many stations are there exactly in total?
- How long is the network?
- How many different types of trains are there in use across all lines?
- How many operators are there?
- How big is Tokyo? Do trains travel out of Tokyo to connect with another city's network? (Excluding Shinkansen)
I am sure many are just dying to know. Any Japanese or Tokyo citizen willing to enlighten us with some information on this matter?
 

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ignoramus said:
Tokyo's Metro
- How many stations are there exactly in total?
I've tried to tackle this one before, this takes lots of time, and also depends on how you count. JR East alone has over 100 in Tokyo proper, that will balloon dramatically if you include the immediate suburbs. My counting method does not count transfer stations multiple times.

ignoramus said:
- How many different types of trains are there in use across all lines?
Most JR Lines have rolling stock characteristic/iconic to the line they serve. Some 20 lines converge in Tokyo, plus extra limited express trains that have no set line per se but have special rolling stock. Then there are suburban lines or even rural lines using older rolling stock too. With private lines, many run through service on other companies lines too, with various models of one another's adding a fair bit of variety to every station - you never know which train model you will board.

ignoramus said:
- How many operators are there?
In Tokyo proper there are over 10 operators. If you include the greater area's suburbs it is about twice as many (maybe more?)
ignoramus said:
- How big is Tokyo? Do trains travel out of Tokyo to connect with another city's network? (Excluding Shinkansen)
It is quite common for the private lines and even some subway lines to run out of Tokyo proper. Most private lines run from the suburbs to the Yamanote Line.
 

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Update for you;

(transfer stations counted once only)


JR East stations in Tokyo proper: 146

Tokyo Metro stations in Tokyo proper minus stations serviced by JR (unless station name is different); 104

Toei stations in Tokyo proper minus stations serviced by JR and Tokyo Metro (unless station name is different); 73, plus the Toden Arakawa ROW streetcar line for another 30 stations (total 103).

On the eastern edge of Tokyo, there are 24 stations uniquely serviced by Tobu railway, 16 stations uniquely serviced by Keisei railway, 17 stations uniquely serviced by Keikyuu railway, 9 stations uniquely serviced by the Tokyo Monorail, 4 stations uniquely serviced by Tokyo Waterfront Railway (Rinkai line), and 10 stations serviced by the Yurikamome line.

I have not tackled the west side yet, which is where the bulk of the trainlines are, including the large networks of Odakyuu railway, Seibu Railway, Tokyuu railway, and Keio railway.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
TRZ said:
Update for you;

(transfer stations counted once only)


JR East stations in Tokyo proper: 146

Tokyo Metro stations in Tokyo proper minus stations serviced by JR (unless station name is different); 104

Toei stations in Tokyo proper minus stations serviced by JR and Tokyo Metro (unless station name is different); 73, plus the Toden Arakawa ROW streetcar line for another 30 stations (total 103).

On the eastern edge of Tokyo, there are 24 stations uniquely serviced by Tobu railway, 16 stations uniquely serviced by Keisei railway, 17 stations uniquely serviced by Keikyuu railway, 9 stations uniquely serviced by the Tokyo Monorail, 4 stations uniquely serviced by Tokyo Waterfront Railway (Rinkai line), and 10 stations serviced by the Yurikamome line.

I have not tackled the west side yet, which is where the bulk of the trainlines are, including the large networks of Odakyuu railway, Seibu Railway, Tokyuu railway, and Keio railway.
HEY THANKS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

SUPER GRATEFUL FOR THE EFFORT YOU PUT IN TO COUNT THE STATIONS...

At least in time to come we are finally able to come up with a more or less accurate figure of how many train stations there are in Tokyo. And Tokyo's train network size can then finally be compared to the sizes of other train networks worldwide...

Tokyo's train network amazes me...

How do you know so much about Tokyo and its train system? You are an expatriate living in Tokyo, or just studying...
 

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Oh wow that is huge. :eek2:
 
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Counted the west side stations
All lines have previously counted lines' stations (transfer points) subtracted.

Tokyuu Railway; 58 stations
Odakyuu Railway; 20 stations
Keio Railway; 60 stations
Seibu Railway; 54 stations
Tama Monorail; 16

TOTALS (by service provider);
JR Lines (includes Tokyo Monorail); 146
Tokyo Metro; 104
Toei (includes Toden Arakawa streetcar); 103
Keisei; 16
Keikyuu; 17
Keio; 60
Tobu; 24
Tokyu; 58
Seibu; 54
Yurikamome; 10
Tokyo Waterfront Railway (Rinkai Line); 4
Tama Monorail; 16

TOTAL; 612*
(need to reconfirm this, had a different figure last night, will update)

Note that this total is for WITHIN TOKYO BORDERS ONLY. The majority of lines leave the Tokyo area and run well into the suburbs, thus lines are being cut-off at the border. Odakyuu for example, has the majority of its network in the neighboring prefecture. Some lines also leave Tokyo and the curve back into it (not common, but happens).

All transfers are counted only once, regardless of providers, unless the name of the station changes.

This count does NOT include the NEW Tsukuba Express line that opens next week in the eastern side of Tokyo (heading northeast).

Line by Line breakdown available if you show enough interest.
 

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The entire Kanto area (greater Tokyo) probably has at least 2000 if not 3000. It's truly ridiculous, and these systems and operators pull in a profit too! Japan is on a totally different level from anywhere else in the world, and Tokyo is on a totally different level from any other Japanese city. Hell, all the lines together average over 30 million riders a day. No other city comes close.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
TRZ said:
Counted the west side stations
All lines have previously counted lines' stations (transfer points) subtracted.

Tokyuu Railway; 58 stations
Odakyuu Railway; 20 stations
Keio Railway; 60 stations
Seibu Railway; 54 stations
Tama Monorail; 16

TOTALS (by service provider);
JR Lines (includes Tokyo Monorail); 146
Tokyo Metro; 104
Toei (includes Toden Arakawa streetcar); 103
Keisei; 16
Keikyuu; 17
Keio; 60
Tobu; 24
Tokyu; 58
Seibu; 54
Yurikamome; 10
Tokyo Waterfront Railway (Rinkai Line); 4
Tama Monorail; 16

TOTAL; 612*
(need to reconfirm this, had a different figure last night, will update)

Note that this total is for WITHIN TOKYO BORDERS ONLY. The majority of lines leave the Tokyo area and run well into the suburbs, thus lines are being cut-off at the border. Odakyuu for example, has the majority of its network in the neighboring prefecture. Some lines also leave Tokyo and the curve back into it (not common, but happens).

All transfers are counted only once, regardless of providers, unless the name of the station changes.

This count does NOT include the NEW Tsukuba Express line that opens next week in the eastern side of Tokyo (heading northeast).

Line by Line breakdown available if you show enough interest.
It seems that only Tokyo Metro has bothered to make their rail system more accessible to foreigners, with the rebranding exercise and the much more user friendly map with each station given a dedicated alphanumeric symbol...

Will there eventually be a map showing all lines and stations run by all companies in the city? Will all maps finally be readable to the non japanese visitors?

Anyways, since the issue of the number of stations in Tokyo proper is tackled, what about the number of stations in a given area? Take your time... Does Tokyo's metro network connect to like any metro network of another city? If it does oh boy that would make counting impossible. At least if it does not, we can hope for a number for the largest cluster of stations in a given region (Still more or less in Tokyo).

Anyways, do all lines in Tokyo feature express, limited express trains? And how many types of trains are there?

Tokyo's metro is just so complicated. Everything is so messy till the extent it becomes so useful. I don't know how people navigate.
 

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ignoramus said:
Tokyo's Metro
- How big is Tokyo? Do trains travel out of Tokyo to connect with another city's network? (Excluding Shinkansen)
Tokyo is 240 square miles (621 square kilometers). Of course There are plenty of trains that go out of Tokyo city limits. I thought Tokyo itself was big, I was wrong. It's about the size of Chicago, but more denser.
 

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Don't they two look alike, The Tokyo JR Map and the Biochemical Pathway Chart:
So we should call it "organic subway."
 

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ignoramus said:
It seems that only Tokyo Metro has bothered to make their rail system more accessible to foreigners, with the rebranding exercise and the much more user friendly map with each station given a dedicated alphanumeric symbol...

Will there eventually be a map showing all lines and stations run by all companies in the city? Will all maps finally be readable to the non japanese visitors?
JR East has made efforts around central Tokyo to be pretty foreigner friendly. But not even Tokyo Metro has been able to allow foreigners to buy transfer tickets yet (these are tickets that work on more than one service provider for a one-ticket trip, rather than paying in two separate instances). Those tickets require an ability to read kanji for the name of the service provider, the name of the station you want to get to, and the name of the station you plan to transfer at. There are also many warnings that are not translated, for example, at some transfer stations you need to leave the fair-paid area and re-enter, and there is a special turnstyle for this (it is coloured orange, it is quite clear to see), but the information telling you to use the special turnstyle is only provided in Japanese (and usually station staff don't speak english should you use the wrong turnstyle).

Don't expect any breakthroughs in foreigner friendly maps outside of the Tokyo Rail Map publication, which is not publicly posted information (it sells for about 700 yen). While I have a usable profiency in Japanese, I was using the Tokyo Rail Map in addition to Japanese ones (the Japanese ones were for border checks). Japan's population is 98% (or more) native, there are not many foreigners. True, this number changes in Tokyo, where there are many more foreigners, but it is still not a large dent. The private railways especially will not consider the funds justified in making their service foreigner friendly. They're preoccupied with making their systems accessible to persons with disabilities, a grossly expensive operation taking many years. JR, Tokyo Metro, and Toei Subways are the only ones that will continue to try and make life easier for foreigners.

ignoramus said:
Anyways, since the issue of the number of stations in Tokyo proper is tackled, what about the number of stations in a given area? Take your time... Does Tokyo's metro network connect to like any metro network of another city? If it does oh boy that would make counting impossible. At least if it does not, we can hope for a number for the largest cluster of stations in a given region (Still more or less in Tokyo).
By area, do you mean by ward/city within Tokyo? I can do that (many stations straddle the border though). Most Tokyo Metro and Toei lines run through service on other lines. Some lines combine to such an extant as to allow you to board a train deep in the suburbs on one end of Tokyo, pass through Tokyo, and get off well into the suburbs on the opposite side of Tokyo on a single train. Here is a list for you:

Tokyo Metro

Ginza Line, Marunouchi Line - No through service (due to use of third-rail technology)
Hibiya Line - Through service on Tobu Isesaki line to Tobu Animal Park. Through service on Tokyuu Toyoko line to Kikuna (on special occasion, through service has been extended before from Hibiya Line Kita-Senjuu terminus to Minatomirai line Motomachi-Chuukagai terminus via Tokyuu Toyoko line Yokohama terminus). No through service from Tokyuu to Tobu via Hibiya.
Chiyoda Line - Through service on Odakyuu main line to Hon-Atsugi. Through service on Odakyuu Tama branch line service (entire line through service). Through service branching off of Ayase station (Chiyoda terminus is North-Ayase station) on the JR Joban line. No through service from JR to Odakyuu via Chiyoda.
Yurakucho Line - Through service on Seibu Ikebukuro Line branching off shortly after Ikebukuro station (via Seibu Yurakucho line). Through service merges with Tobu Tojo line at Wakoshi station.
Hanzomon line - Through service on Tokyu Denentoshi line (entire line), and Tobu Isesaki line, branching off at Tobu Animal Park and continuing on the Tobu Nikko line to Minami-Kurishashi. Through service is provided from Tokyu to Tobu via Hanzomon.
Tozai Line - Toyo Line through service. Limited through service on JR Chuo-Sobu Local line.
Namboku Line - Through on Tokyu Meguro line (entire line) and Saitama Railway line (entire line).



There are various levels of express on many lines.
 

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ignoramus said:
Tokyo's Metro
Not to be mistakened for the operator ''Tokyo Metro''. By metro I am referring to private urban rail lines, JR East lines, Tokyo Metro subway lines etc etc...
- How many stations are there exactly in total?
- How long is the network?
- How many different types of trains are there in use across all lines?
- How many operators are there?
- How big is Tokyo? Do trains travel out of Tokyo to connect with another city's network? (Excluding Shinkansen)
I am sure many are just dying to know. Any Japanese or Tokyo citizen willing to enlighten us with some information on this matter?
It depends on what you define a city to be. Yokohama is Japan's second largest city, but it's only 30 minutes from central Tokyo. Kawasaki is Japan's 9th largest city, and it's sandwiched between Tokyo and Yokohama. You then have many cities with over 250,000 people surrounding all of this. The only cities with special municipal rail services are Tokyo (Tokyo Metro, Toei Subway), Yokohama (Municipal Subway), and Chiba (Chiba Monorail). These railways focus on bringing people to their respective city centers- most other railways cross city borders and can't be identified to one specific city.

As for how far you can get on a SINGLE train ride from CENTRAL Tokyo (Yamanote Line station) on LOCAL trains running at least TWICE per hour, you can get as far west as Otsuki (88 km), as far southwest as Atami (105 km), as far northwest as Takasaki (105 km), as far north as Utsunomiya (110 km), as far northeast as Mito (121 km), and as far east as Narita Airport (79 km). From all of these stations (except for the airport), you can usually transfer to another train immediately and continue your journey in that direction.
 

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TRZ said:
Tokyo Metro

Ginza Line, Marunouchi Line - No through service (due to use of third-rail technology)
Hibiya Line - Through service on Tobu Isesaki line to Tobu Animal Park. Through service on Tokyuu Toyoko line to Kikuna (on special occasion, through service has been extended before from Hibiya Line Kita-Senjuu terminus to Minatomirai line Motomachi-Chuukagai terminus via Tokyuu Toyoko line Yokohama terminus). No through service from Tokyuu to Tobu via Hibiya.
Chiyoda Line - Through service on Odakyuu main line to Hon-Atsugi. Through service on Odakyuu Tama branch line service (entire line through service). Through service branching off of Ayase station (Chiyoda terminus is North-Ayase station) on the JR Joban line. No through service from JR to Odakyuu via Chiyoda.
Yurakucho Line - Through service on Seibu Ikebukuro Line branching off shortly after Ikebukuro station (via Seibu Yurakucho line). Through service merges with Tobu Tojo line at Wakoshi station.
Hanzomon line - Through service on Tokyu Denentoshi line (entire line), and Tobu Isesaki line, branching off at Tobu Animal Park and continuing on the Tobu Nikko line to Minami-Kurishashi. Through service is provided from Tokyu to Tobu via Hanzomon.
Tozai Line - Toyo Line through service. Limited through service on JR Chuo-Sobu Local line.
Namboku Line - Through on Tokyu Meguro line (entire line) and Saitama Railway line (entire line).



There are various levels of express on many lines.
Here's the list of the through services by subways:

Asakusa Line towards:

Misakiguchi (with Keihin Express Line)
Haneda Airport (with Keikyu Airport Line)
Inba Nihon Medical University (with Hokuso Line)
Narita Airport (with Keisei Line)

Nanboku Line towards:

Urawa Misono (with Saitama Rapid Line)

Hibiya Line towards:

Kikuna (with Tokyu Toyoko Line)
Tobu Dobutsu Koen (with Tobu Isezaki Line)

Hanzomon Line towards:

Chuo Rinkan (with Tokyu Denentoshi Line)
Minami Kurihashi (with Tobu Nikko Line)

Chiyoda Line towards:

Hon Atsugi (with Odakyu Line)
Toride (with Joban Line)

Shinjuku Line towards:

Hashimoto (with Keio Line)

Tozai Line towards:

Mitaka (with Chuo Line)
Toyo Katsutadai (with Toyo Rapid Line)
Tsudanuma (with Keisei Line)

Yurakucho Line (and Yurakucho New Line) towards:

Hanno (with Seibu Ikebukuro Line)
Shinrin Koen (with Tobu Tojo Line)


*Marunouchi Line, Ginza Line, Oedo Line, Mita Line don't have through services.
 

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DoubleR said:
*Marunouchi Line, Ginza Line, Oedo Line, Mita Line don't have through services.
Thanks for posting the Toei lines (found it unnecessary to repost the Tokyo Metro info though). However, Mita Line (along with Namboku Line) are through service on Tokyuu Meguro Line to Musashi-Kosugi.

The Tozai Line is not through on Keisei, but JR Sobu Line to Tsudanuma.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
TRZ said:
JR East has made efforts around central Tokyo to be pretty foreigner friendly. But not even Tokyo Metro has been able to allow foreigners to buy transfer tickets yet (these are tickets that work on more than one service provider for a one-ticket trip, rather than paying in two separate instances). Those tickets require an ability to read kanji for the name of the service provider, the name of the station you want to get to, and the name of the station you plan to transfer at. There are also many warnings that are not translated, for example, at some transfer stations you need to leave the fair-paid area and re-enter, and there is a special turnstyle for this (it is coloured orange, it is quite clear to see), but the information telling you to use the special turnstyle is only provided in Japanese (and usually station staff don't speak english should you use the wrong turnstyle).

Don't expect any breakthroughs in foreigner friendly maps outside of the Tokyo Rail Map publication, which is not publicly posted information (it sells for about 700 yen). While I have a usable profiency in Japanese, I was using the Tokyo Rail Map in addition to Japanese ones (the Japanese ones were for border checks). Japan's population is 98% (or more) native, there are not many foreigners. True, this number changes in Tokyo, where there are many more foreigners, but it is still not a large dent. The private railways especially will not consider the funds justified in making their service foreigner friendly. They're preoccupied with making their systems accessible to persons with disabilities, a grossly expensive operation taking many years. JR, Tokyo Metro, and Toei Subways are the only ones that will continue to try and make life easier for foreigners.



By area, do you mean by ward/city within Tokyo? I can do that (many stations straddle the border though). Most Tokyo Metro and Toei lines run through service on other lines. Some lines combine to such an extant as to allow you to board a train deep in the suburbs on one end of Tokyo, pass through Tokyo, and get off well into the suburbs on the opposite side of Tokyo on a single train. Here is a list for you:

Tokyo Metro

Ginza Line, Marunouchi Line - No through service (due to use of third-rail technology)
Hibiya Line - Through service on Tobu Isesaki line to Tobu Animal Park. Through service on Tokyuu Toyoko line to Kikuna (on special occasion, through service has been extended before from Hibiya Line Kita-Senjuu terminus to Minatomirai line Motomachi-Chuukagai terminus via Tokyuu Toyoko line Yokohama terminus). No through service from Tokyuu to Tobu via Hibiya.
Chiyoda Line - Through service on Odakyuu main line to Hon-Atsugi. Through service on Odakyuu Tama branch line service (entire line through service). Through service branching off of Ayase station (Chiyoda terminus is North-Ayase station) on the JR Joban line. No through service from JR to Odakyuu via Chiyoda.
Yurakucho Line - Through service on Seibu Ikebukuro Line branching off shortly after Ikebukuro station (via Seibu Yurakucho line). Through service merges with Tobu Tojo line at Wakoshi station.
Hanzomon line - Through service on Tokyu Denentoshi line (entire line), and Tobu Isesaki line, branching off at Tobu Animal Park and continuing on the Tobu Nikko line to Minami-Kurishashi. Through service is provided from Tokyu to Tobu via Hanzomon.
Tozai Line - Toyo Line through service. Limited through service on JR Chuo-Sobu Local line.
Namboku Line - Through on Tokyu Meguro line (entire line) and Saitama Railway line (entire line).



There are various levels of express on many lines.
Man you sure know A LOT about Tokyo. Shall bug you for more info on Tokyo in the future :) :) :) haha....

Why ain't there through service on lines running on third rail? I don't get that...

Does the Tokyo Rail map come in english? Is it sold online?
 

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The vast majority of the trains that operate in Tokyo are electric multiple units (EMUs) that draw power from catenary power lines from above the tracks. In the case of third rail, power is drawn from beside the track. Not only that, the voltage provided to each power system is often different, and some are AC powered while others are DC. Making them compatible would require quite a lot of work with trains (eg. adding pantographs).

Some lines are also not compatible because of the numerous gauges used on some Tokyo rail lines. A lot of them, particularly the JR East lines operate the 1067mm narrow gauge.
 

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Another thing is, a lot of the private railways still have no grade-seperation of track, so there's lots of road crossings. I imagine that would complicate things with a third rail.
 
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