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Welcome to the Rail World
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AG said:
The vast majority of the trains that operate in Tokyo are electric multiple units (EMUs) that draw power from catenary power lines from above the tracks. In the case of third rail, power is drawn from beside the track. Not only that, the voltage provided to each power system is often different, and some are AC powered while others are DC. Making them compatible would require quite a lot of work with trains (eg. adding pantographs).

Some lines are also not compatible because of the numerous gauges used on some Tokyo rail lines. A lot of them, particularly the JR East lines operate the 1067mm narrow gauge.
Yeah, as already stated (implied), within Tokyo area Marunouchi and Ginza lines are the only lines using a third-rail. I think some others are in Kyoto-Osaka area, but this is "imported technology" that was discontinued once the Japanese were building their own lines without foreign assistance. The Oedo Line is new but also incompatible, using (semi-)linear-motor technology. Almost all lines are narrow-gauge (subways and shinkansen are standard gauge), excluding new transit systems (yurikamome) and monorails. The Keio Line uses some absurd gauge found nowhere else in the country, but Toei built a subway line (Shinjuku line) with the same gauge for the express purpose of running through service on Keio (I beleive this is one of the pioneers of the through service schtick). Other weird gauges include the Tokyuu Setagaya Line (Wide gauge), and probably the Toden Arakawa Line (Kanto's only streetcar line). However, due to a railway nationalization law that has been in effect for just shy of all hundred years now, lines are almost a narrow gauge. While there are lines that differ in the AC and DC power supplies, many rolling stock now are compatible with both and thus are not an issue for through-service operations.

The main thing with third-rail though, is that through-service operations are on surface rail networks, which include at-grade corssings, which is impossible with third rail (not safe is an understatement).
 

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TRZ said:
Chiyoda Line - Through service on Odakyuu main line to Hon-Atsugi. Through service on Odakyuu Tama branch line service (entire line through service). Through service branching off of Ayase station (Chiyoda terminus is North-Ayase station) on the JR Joban line. No through service from JR to Odakyuu via Chiyoda.
Just a minor correction- there are trains that run from Karakida on the Odakyu Tama Line to Matsudo, Kashiwa, Abiko, and Toride on the JR Joban line via the Chiyoda subway now.

Also, the Toei Mita Line also has through service with the Tokyu Meguro Line to Musashi Kosugi, just like the Namboku Line.

And when Line 13 is completed (I think the name is going to be the Meiji Line, since it runs under Meiji Road), it will connect with the Tokyu Toyoko Line to Yokohama Chinatown, and with the Seibu Ikebukuro Line from Kotake Mukaihara.
 

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New commuter rail in Tokyo - Tsukuba Express

Tsukuba Express is the new commuter rail that will connect central Tokyo and Tsukuba city in Ibaraki prefecture. Its 58.3km of dedicated tracks are entirely underground or elevated with no grade crossing. TX makes the biggest metropolitan rail system, even bigger.




JR Akihabara Station


TX Akihabara Station (Underground)


Station 2


Station 3



Station 4


There are plans to extend the line to Tokyo Station eventually.


Platform gates




Rapid train service will take you to Tsukuba terminal in only 45 minutes. This is a great improvement over the current express bus service between Tokyo Station and Tsukuba. Sometimes it takes as long as 3 hours to get there on the bus due to heavy traffic in central Tokyo.


The rolling stocks are manufactured by either Hitachi or Kawasaki Heavy Industries.


"Thank you for riding the Tsukuba Express tonight" English announcements are made in Brtish English rather than American English commonly used in Eastern Japan.


LED Route map. This is pretty retro considering the latest Japanese rolling stocks are equipped with LCDs.


Crossing the Ayase river.


Travelling near Tsukuba at 130km/h. TX is fast and extremely quiet even underground. The tracks use longer rails which create fewer gaps between them, resulting in superb ride quality with almost no bumps or shakes.

It was surprising to see many stations surrounded by undeveloped land just like what you see in the picture above. I'm sure they will be filled with houses, apartments and shopping malls within the next few years or so.
 

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LED displays better describe the location and direction of the train. I think full-colour LCD screens are better for advertising and news, unless you want a really long strip of LCD to describe the route and stations.

The trains look kind of funny, but as usual with Japanese railways, a formidably impressive job indeed.
 

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superchan7 said:
LED displays better describe the location and direction of the train. I think full-colour LCD screens are better for advertising and news, unless you want a really long strip of LCD to describe the route and stations.
LCD screens are better suited for a network as huge as Tokyo's. It displays more information such as connections, real-time service delays/suspension, estimated arrival time. Try to display half of that with LEDs and signs in both Japanese and English with a legible size font. Tokyo station for example, is served by 13 different lines such as Tokaido Shinkansen, Nagano Shinkansen, Akita Shinkansen, Joetsu Shinkansen, Yamagata Shinkensen, Akita Shinkensen, Yamanote line, Keihin-Tohoku line, Chuo line, Sobu line, Keiyo line, Tokaido line, and Marunouchi subway line.

LCD displays are not just for the news and ads in Japan. They actually serve a purpose.
 

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Tsukuba Express Stations:

Akihabara




Shin Okachimachi




Asakusa




Minami Senju




Kita Senju




Aoi




Rokucho




Yashio




Misato Chuo




Minami Nagareyama




Nagareyama Central Park




Nagareyama Ootaka no Mori




Kashiwanoha Campus




Kashiwatanaka




Moriya




Miraidaira




Midorino



Banpakukinenkoen (Expo Memorial Park)



Kenkyugakuen




Tsukuba


 

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¡Viva el metro!
DavoR
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What is the average distance between stations, please?
:?
Thanks!
 

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¡Viva el metro!
DavoR
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Poly_Technique said:
20 stations / 58.3 km :)
Almost 3 km. between stations, then it's a commuter train, not metro.
;)
 

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The stations are relatively close together near Tokyo, then become increasingly seperated beyond Kita Senju. Past Moriya, there's practically nothing except rice fields. From Akihabara to Moriya there's 9 trains per hour, with only 4 going onward to Tsukuba.
 

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Tears of Buddha
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TX pics

type2000 (regular operational speed: 130 kmph)

concource for TX (Akihabara Sta.)

new entrance for TX (Akihabara Sta.)


tickreting gate for TX (Akihabara Sta.)



ticket-vending machine with LCD display

wireless LAN for internet on the trains
 
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