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I agree in that it doesn't seem so economically practical.
I've worked on some projects that Koike is pushing on, such as the Ogasawara Airport,.. and to me, a lot of her infrastructure initiatives seem more about leaving a legacy behind, rather than actual benefits and needs.

Based on the reports. she wants to make Toyosu, and perhaps the entire Koto ward some kind of mega center for economic activity.. rather than just being a filled with apartments and fish.
You gotta love politicians, always want to leave a legacy. Good luck to her in turning Toyosu into anything more than the tourist haven it has become.

They've been throwing senseless money at Odaiba to make it a commercial hub since the 90s yet its no more than a leisure spot which is not bad, but expecting a periferral location to become a commercial hub is wishful at best and wreckless at worst.

as for depopulation.. I, and many people outside of Tokyo, much prefer Japan de-centralize so other regions can regain its population and industries. Tokyo is growing at the cost of most of the other prefectures.
Unfortunately globalization has ensured that de-centralization will never hapan. The need for companies to be in close proximity to one another to get the best out of agglomeration meant that companies kept flocking to Tokyo.

And even within Tokyo, the highest number of jobs is still contained in the area surrounded by Marunouchi, Nihombashi, Yurakucho and Ginza nevermind the efforts made to decentralized that area by moving the government offices to Shinjuku. The Kanto region transport network is concentrated there and changing this is impossible.

One can even make the argument that centering the Shinkansen network around Tokyo station accelerated the mass exodus to Tokyo and the resulting de-population of other regions. The Shinkansen was thought of as a way to rejuvenate the economies of other regions outside Tokyo, instead it accelerated their decline and further reinforced Tokyo's centrality.

The industries that once thrived in other regions have long been exported to China and are never coming back. Leaving the financial and administrative components to cluster around Tokyo.
 

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Asian forums Supermod
Official SSC Conference in Pyong Yang 2021
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One can even make the argument that centering the Shinkansen network around Tokyo station accelerated the mass exodus to Tokyo and the resulting de-population of other regions. The Shinkansen was thought of as a way to rejuvenate the economies of other regions outside Tokyo, instead it accelerated their decline and further reinforced Tokyo's centrality.
yeah i've heard the same exact thing too.
which is why I'm not particularly super supportive of some shinkansen projects as they seem more a public-works job-creation scheme, rather than really helping a place in the long term. ultimately its a case to case basis.

but what I do personally experience is that once some place has improved high speed accessibility.. they feel more motivated to move to the big city for work since they feel they can 'come home' any time within an hour or two.
 

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Asian forums Supermod
Official SSC Conference in Pyong Yang 2021
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I don't agree that population decline is something that society as a whole needs to worry about. Countries with growing populations have more social problems that countries with declining populations - and it's not as if infrastructure can't be scaled back in the future.

I generally feel that the regions north of the mountains aren't habitable to the extent that regions south of the mountains are. I expect that the populations here would move to the Tokai area to escape the harsher climate.
 

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Asian forums Supermod
Official SSC Conference in Pyong Yang 2021
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anyways back on track (get it)

Tokyo's only city not connected by rail, will finally be connected?
and also an example of what I kept mentioning here over and over
monorail is very useful in exact situations like this where you need something that can climb hills
as well as when its difficult to secure right of way


Summary Translation
Musashimurayama city (in western Tokyo) will get rail! via the extension of the Tama monorail line. it will hopefully extend north from Kitakamidai station. the goal is to connect it to Hachioji
Researching the extension will cost 100 million yen
The city, despite its rapid growth has neither rail nor national roads (closest equivelent would be highway in other countries)
Its planned to connect to Seibu, and there was also a plan for an LRT line but they found it too hilly for that

 

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It has been eight years since I presented my show to the Central Electric Railfans' Association. It was about trains in Tokyo and Yokohama, Japan. I publicized it using the title, "I Shot J. R. (& Keikyu, Keio, Odakyu, et alia)"; which was a twist on the then-recent revival of the 1980s television show "Dallas", and its protagonist | antagonist J. R. Ewing.
This was seemingly a bit too much for Tony Coppoletta, who was the emcee of C.E.R.A. programs in 2012. He publicized it as "Trains of Tokyo and Yokohama". Whatever.
I lost a substantial portion of my audience when the 'closing event' of Chicago Craft Beer Week occurred at the same time on the same evening (Friday) (even though the calendar showed CCBW extending through to Sunday). (If I wasn't scheduled to do this show that night, I would have wanted to attend that 'closing event'.)
But it was a good show. To illustrate that, I have now uploaded all the photographs I showed that night, and included the script in which I described the photographs. Some of these photographs can no longer be replicated. (The grade crossing in Shimo-Kitazawa has been eliminated.)
The file has gone off-line a few times. After an incident at December 2014's C.E.R.A. show, in which we had a delay due to technical problems; I was actually asked if there was something I could show while we were trying to fix it. My answer was 'no', because I didn't have that USB flash drive with me then. [We did fix it.]
We had an internet connection. I remembered uploading this. When I went to the site of the last uploader I had utilized, the file had rinsed off.
So I decided to upload it again just in case we had another technical snag.
The file is 24.23 MB.
My photographs are Creative Commons - Attribution - NonCommercial - ShareAlike BY-NC-SA. Essentially, you can do whatever you wish with them, including making derivative works of them, as long as you do not try to make any money from doing so.

Here are contact sheets of the images.
http://fotowrzut.pl/tmp/upload/GFRYA6SFSX/1.jpg http://fotowrzut.pl/tmp/upload/GFRYA6SFSX/2.jpg http://fotowrzut.pl/tmp/upload/GFRYA6SFSX/3.jpg http://fotowrzut.pl/tmp/upload/GFRYA6SFSX/4.jpg http://fotowrzut.pl/tmp/upload/GFRYA6SFSX/5.jpg
The file is now stored at these upload hosts. You need only download from one of them.
The DLKey, if necessary is 8124
The .rar password is "Keikyu_via_Sengakuji" {without the quotes}.
 

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ご乗車頂いて&#
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Here are some pix I took of the newly converted Central Passage between the east and west gates of JR Shinjuku station.


Where the old West Gate used to be.


The fare gates were here, but now the connection mounts are covered up until the floor can be redone.


The middle of the passage looks pretty nice; looks like the newer New South Gate part of the station under the bus terminal and NewWOman shopping complex.


East gates were here underneath the green strip.





Now the gates are pushed into the sides of the wide passage, reminiscent of Ikebukuro and Yokohama stations thanks to the excavation done underneath all the platforms. Yes, there was nothing but dirt underneath most of Shinjuku station’s platforms.


Keio and Odakyu passengers may no longer “cut through” JR’s East gate to access their platforms. Now they must use the new passage to get to their “front doors” on the west side of the station... which is quicker now anyway!
 

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From Metro Report:

 

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Tokyo Metro new 17000 series



The new 17000 series to operate on Tokyo Metro’s Yurakucho and Fukutoshin lines was unveiled at Shinkiba depot on August 11. In March 2019 Tokyo Metro announced the introduction of new trains for the Yurakucho and Fukutoshin lines as well a parent trains, the 18000 trainsets to update the Hanzomon Line.













A total of 180 cars will be introduced until FY 2022 replacing the veteran 7000 series. Trains will be formed into six 10-car and 15 eight-car sets.





Max speed is 100 km/h and will run on the super-line system formed by the Tobu-Tojo + Fukutoshin/Yurakucho + Tokyu Toyoko and Minato Mirai Lines. The floor height of the new stock is 60 mm lower than 7000 series, reducing the step between the train and platform.

 

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Tobu Railway will start on September 26 a new elevated section on the Tobu Isesaki Line (Tobu Skytree Line). They will be the two express tracks spanning several level crossings around Takenotsuka Station (Adachi district) in Tokyo.





Thus ends the first part of the 1.7-kilometer double-track elevation between Nishiarai and Yatsuka. The next phase will be to raise the two tracks and central platform of the Takenotsuka station (the tracks for non-stop [general] trains are the outer ones) which is scheduled to be completed in 2023.








 
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