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@ FML

^^ Gee, thanks. :)

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With the vastness of Tokyo's railway network...how the heck could people not get lost? Just by looking at the map you made makes me dizzy. In fact, I unerestimated its size when I thought it only had 40+ lines. Thanks to burningbaka, I realized that their where, in fact, 136 lines.

I also took time to look at the route-system of the entire network and it was exponentially more perplexing. Not only is the network infrastructure itself dizzyingly vast but also some lines are shared by two or more services. Now THAT was REALLY, REALLY confusing.

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Btw, are there some abandoned lines in the Greater Tokyo Railway Network?

I mean, some big (but definitely smaller than Tokyo's) urban railway networks have abandoned lines. I know London and New York has some.
 

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Btw, are there some abandoned lines in the Greater Tokyo Railway Network?
As for subways proper (Tokyo Metro + Toei), I do not know any lines/sections abandoned, except of some abandoned stations like Manseibashi.

If you include non-subways, then yes, there are lot. Just like Europe or Americas, Japan lost many railway lines when personal automobiles came into wide use. Unlike United States, however, the motorization in the country came as late as 1960s, which is the part of the reason why Japan still have many passenger railway lines survived, but they still did lose quite many lines as well... and they still are. The obvious example is Tokyo Toden (Toei Streetcar), once an extensive network with 41 routes, now shrank to just 1. The latest example, although possibly not inside Greater Tokyo, is Kashima Railway Line, which ceased its operation in April 1, 2007. (The latest update of my "Greater Tokyo" map was to erase that line, sadly.) Japanese Wikipedia article lists 57 lines abandoned in Tokyo - Kanagawa - Saitama - Chiba, counting the whole Toden network as 1.

how the heck could people not get lost?
I believe someone else said the same thing, but it's actually not that difficult. All the important area in central Tokyo (except of, say, Odaiba) are along Yamanote Line, while almost all the suburban lines terminate at some station of Yamanote Line. So more than often, you will just take Line A to the nearest Yamanote Line Station, then take Yamanote Line to the destination. If your destination is another suburb (or somewhere far like Yokohama), then you have to take another suburban line from there, but that's about it.
 

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JR E231
Yamanote line

Shonan Shinjuku line

Chuo Sobu line

Chuo line (for through service with the Tozai line)


JR E501
Joban line


JR E217
Yokosuka line


JR E531
Joban line


JR 205
Keiyo line

Musashino line


JR 209
Negishi line


JR 211
Tokaido line


Tokyu 9000
Toyoko line


Tokyu 5050
Denentoshi line


Keisei 3000
Keisei main line


Keisei 3700
Keisei main line


Keikyu 1000
Keikyu main line


Odakyu 2000
Odawara line


Odakyu 3000
Odawara line


Tobu 30000
Denentoshi line


Tobu 50050
Denentoshi line


Seibu 6000
Seibu Shinjuku line


Seibu 20000
Seibu Shinjuku line


Keio 8000
Keio line


Sotetsu 7000
Sotetsu main line


Sotetsu 10000
Sotetsu main line


Rinkai 70-000
Saikyo line


Minato Mirai Y500
Toyoko line


Saitama Rapid Railway 2000
Meguro line


Toyo Rapid Railway 2000
Tozai line
 

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JR E231
Chuo line, Ome line


JR E331
Keiyo line


Keikyu N1000
Keikyu main line
 

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Tokyo metro or Eidan 01 I don't know how call these Tokyo Metro or Eidan ? :dunno:
Ginza line


Tokyo metro 02
Marunouchi line


Tokyo metro 03
Hibiya line


Tokyo metro 05
Tozai line


Tokyo metro N05
Tozai line


Tokyo metro 6000
Chiyoda line


Tokyo metro 7000
Yurakucho line


Tokyo metro 07
Yurakucho line


Tokyo metro 8000
Hanzomon line


Tokyo metro 08
Hanzomon line


Tokyo metro 9000
Namboku line


Tokyo metro 10000
Fukutoshin line




Toei 5300
Asakusa line


Toei 6300
Mita line


Toei 10-000
Shinjuku line


Toei 10-300
Shinjuku line


Toei 12-000
Oedo line




Yokohama Chikatetsu 1000
line 1 and 3


Yokohama Chikatetsu 2000
line 1 and 3


Yokohama Chikatetsu 3000
line 1 and 3




Tsukuba Express 1000
Tsukuba Express line
 

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It is not a maglev subway but a subway with a linear motor

micro said:
Not correct! Don't confuse linear motor with magnetic levitation. Oedo line runs on conventional rails and wheels. It has linear motors but not maglev.
Maglev means floating on a magnetic cushion which Oedo line does not. There are several metro lines with linear motors in the world, as well as several airport people movers.
And the first subway with a linear motor is the Tsurumiryokuchi line in Osaka.
 

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Wich is the best Tokyo metro or Toei subway ?
I know that Tokyo metro system is larger and busier than Toei subway subway.
 

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Does anybody know of any Tokyo Metro and/or JR East maps for Google Earth? So far I've only found one for the Yamanote Line.
 

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The greatest good point of a Japanese subway is accuracy of departure and arrival time.

All world subways will be inferior to Japan.

But personally, I like France and a Belgian subway .
I my experience the trains run so frequently in Tokyo that I have no idea whether they are on on time or an hour late!

I just show up at the staion with a map and check the characters on the front of the train and ocasionally I actually arrive at my destination.
 

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I my experience the trains run so frequently in Tokyo that I have no idea whether they are on on time or an hour late!

I just show up at the staion with a map and check the characters on the front of the train and ocasionally I actually arrive at my destination.
How often do they come then? Every 1 minute? 2 minutes?
 

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How often do they come then? Every 1 minute? 2 minutes?
In the center of Tokyo they appear to be running at 2-3 minute intervals. Once, when we visited a temple in the suburbs on a weekend, we actually had to wait about 15 minutes.
 
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