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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey guys, sorry I haven't posting much lately, but I've been busy lately!

From August 9-19 2013, I went on a huge trip in the Midwest U.S., visiting the cities of Toledo, Chicago, and Detroit!

This is the first day in Toledo, Ohio (Population 287,000). I came down to visit the city, tour downtown, the Old West End, and went to a Mud Hens (AAA affiliate of the Detroit Tigers) baseball game at Fifth Third Field.

This tour mainly focuses on downtown Toledo, the riverfront, the Docks, and the Warehouse District. The pictures were taken from late afternoon to the night.

Also, these are the first set of pictures I have ever taken on my amazing new Canon Rebel T41 DSLR Camera!

My hotel, the Park Inn downtown Toledo


My room


15th floor view of the Maumee River, Anthony Wayne Bridge, and the headquarters of Owens Corning




Historic Fort Industry Square commercial Block across from the Park Inn on Summit Street






Looking east on St. Clair Street in downtown Toledo


Looking up at the Fiberglas Tower, the 30-storey office building is Toledo's second tallest. Built in 1969, the building currently stands vacant.




National City Bank Building


Back of the Toledo Edison building and Riverfront Apartments




Ohio Building, built in 1896






A very handsome KeyBank branch...


Behind the Huntington Center...




Spitzer Building, built in 1896




Nicholas Building


Behind the Nicholas Building




The incredible LaSalle Building, former flagship store of LaSalle & Koch Department Stores (long gone, acquired by Macy's), built in 1913




Charter One Bank Branch downtown across from the LaSalle building


Looking up at some of downtown Toledo's historic buildings


One Lake Erie Center




Commodore Perry Hotel, now apartments


Looking up at the Commodore Perry Hotel, built in 1927


Secor Building, another former hotel, completed in 1908






Huntington Center, downtown Toledo's 8,000 seat arena, home of the Toledo Walleye of the East Coast Hockey League, affiliate of the Detroit Red Wings and the Chicago Blackhawks


Seagate Convention Center


Park Inn again...


One and Three Seagate and the former Steam Plant, sitting vacant on Toledo's riverfront


Riverfront walkway between the Maumee River and Summit Street


Downtown Toledo from the riverfront




COSI Science Center and Best Western hotel


One Seagate, regional headquarters of Fifth Third Bank, the tallest building in the city, sits 32 storeys high and was built in 1982.




Maumee River from the Cherry Street bridge


Downtown Toledo from the Cherry Street bridge



International Park


Toledo skyline from the Docks restaurant and entertainment complex










The Docks entertainment complex, many higher-end restaurants and nightclubs here




Empty land on the east riverfront near Cherry Street. This was the site of the former Toledo Sports Arena, was demolished a few years ago.




Glass City Skyway


One Seagate again from Summit Street




Four Seagate


Toledo Blade Building, where the city's daily newspaper is printed




Downtown's new United Way building




Valentine Theatre


Toledo City Hall




Public Safety Building


St. Paul's Lutheran Church


Historic Lucas County Courthouse






Toledo Public Safety




Just a portion of downtown's historic building blocks...




Valentine Theatre


Trinity Episcopal Church


HCR Manor Care building


Toledo Edison Building


Riverfront Apartments




The abandoned, yet iconic steam plant


Fiberglas Tower, also abandoned and iconic


Fifth Third Field, Toledo's magnificent 10,000-seat minor league ball park, home of the famous Toledo Mud Hens of the International Baseball League, opened in 2002 and has been a huge catalyst in the revitalization of downtown and the warehouse district.


Commercial blocks in the Warehouse District






Front entrance to Fifth Third Field


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[IMG]http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3692/9670767080_80811d42ab_c.jpg





Mud Hens and Walleye shop, this block is part of Fifth Third Field


Tony Packo's at the park, near Fifth Third Field, it's a Toledo institution, made famous by Jamie Farr, who played Max Klinger on M*A*S*H and mentioned this place.


Inside Tony Packo's


The awesome food at Tony Packo's! Chili soup and crackers, loaded potato skins with Chili, Fries, and Tony Packo's famous hot dog!


Ye Olde Durty Bird, a bar that re-opened a couple of years ago after it closed quite a few years ago and changed into a couple of other businesses. It's a popular spot for Mud Hens fans before and after the game as I was told by Matt and Meg, the two awesome bartenders working that night. We talked about Toledo and all it has to offer, among other things!




Night pictures, Fort Industry Square


Downtown at night, I apologize for the occasional blurriness, I was a bit drunk at the time, courtesy of Ye Olde Durty Bird...

One Seagate at night...








Downtown Toledo from Cherry Street bridge








Toledo Skyline from the docks across the Maumee River and International Park
















Downtown from the riverfront












Views of downtown from the Park Inn




Across the Maumee at the docks


Owens Corning Headquarters from my room...


Hope you enjoyed Day 1 of my time in Toledo! Coming soon… Old West Toledo, Mud Hens game, Chicago, and Detroit!
 

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You and your new camera did a great job on these photos, er, at least when you were sober.:lol: This was a very enjoyable thread, but too long as many of the photos are the same as others. Still, thanks for the tour of Toledo, a city that isn't shown much here. I was surprised at all of the architectural gems that the city has, it looks like a city well worth a trip to explore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for posting these, Jay! I have driven past Toledo a few times in the past and always wondered what it looked like! :)
I'm curious, why is the Fiberglas Tower empty? It is so strange having an empty office tower.
It used to be the world headquarters of Owens-Corning Fiberglass until they moved out in 1996 to the location you see out the view of my hotel room.

It has been vacant ever since, but I believe they have cleaned the Asbestos out of the building and making it ready for redevelopment. Right now the Eyde Co. of Lansing, Michigan wants to convert it into a mixed use building, which includes condos, a hotel, office space, and a restaurant. As to whether that will happen or not, I don't know, haven't heard much on it lately. Hopefully it happens.
 

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Man, I wish I had travelled to Toledo at some point when I lived in Ohio.

Streets sure are dead though, but I guess that's pretty common in America in general.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You and your new camera did a great job on these photos, er, at least when you were sober.:lol: This was a very enjoyable thread, but too long as many of the photos are the same as others. Still, thanks for the tour of Toledo, a city that isn't shown much here. I was surprised at all of the architectural gems that the city has, it looks like a city well worth a trip to explore.
LOL, thanks for the comments, Paule! I am aware I sometimes take too many pictures of one thing at once. It's kind of obsessive compulsive with me. I have removed some of the repeat pictures from the thread. Toledo does have a lot of its historical and architectural gems in tact.

ZKB9, indeed, downtown Toledo's streets are very underused, unfortunately. However, downtown is heading in the right direction with the Fifth Third Field and the Huntington Center helping to make downtown more of a destination. Other than those, downtown Toledo hasn't seen a great deal in development like nearby Detroit or Cleveland. It's kind of a 9 to 5 type of place.
 

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It used to be the world headquarters of Owens-Corning Fiberglass until they moved out in 1996 to the location you see out the view of my hotel room.

It has been vacant ever since, but I believe they have cleaned the Asbestos out of the building and making it ready for redevelopment. Right now the Eyde Co. of Lansing, Michigan wants to convert it into a mixed use building, which includes condos, a hotel, office space, and a restaurant. As to whether that will happen or not, I don't know, haven't heard much on it lately. Hopefully it happens.
Great Pics! Always fantastic to see toledo and other seldom seen cities on the board.

It's my understanding that the Fiberglas tower is now called the Tower on the Maumee. Apparently all of the environmental cleanup is now completely taken care of which was a huge undertaking and was one main reason why owens-corning left and no one moved in.Apparently the developers have received several tax credits from the state of Ohio. Unfortunately federal funds have been delayed due to the gridlock in Washington which has pushed back the start date of the renovation. I believe the renovation was supposed to start early this summer.

Toledo is actually a great city in my opinion and really has some nice amenities for a city of its size. The toledo museum of art has one the best glass collections in the world. It certainly didn't help the downtown atmosphere when Owens-Illinois(OI) recently moved its corporate headquarters from downtown to a new campus they built in the suburb of Perrysburg. That being said toledo has made some improvements in recent years to their downtown and has one of the nicer minor league baseball stadiums and hockey arenas in the country.
 

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What a proud and prosperous place it (at least) once must have been.

I hope it's doing better than some of the other mid-size Ohio cities I'm familiar with, who's cores seem to have been treated like a used kleenex, tossed and forgotten about (except by some rather heroic preservationists and restorers). Not just an Ohio phenomenon, of course.

My sense is that Canada has been far more conscientious about conserving its man-made urban legacies.
 

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You can tell from the photos that Toledo has some great history and architecture. I've seen some old pictures of Toledo that make it look extremely dense.
 
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