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We have a historical thread in the Canada forums in which we discussed church style influences in Canada. I did these compilations of churches in Toronto that used the neo-Gothic style, so popular in Victorian England. I've posted most of these scattered throughout this thread, but figured I'd show the compilations here too as they are all gathered together. I think the pressure for Gothic design was so strong that many of the Catholic Churches (including St Michael's Cathedral) are in English Gothic style. The clearest and simplest example of Early English Gothic in its pure form is the beautiful chapel at Trinity College, University of Toronto. It was designed in the 1950's by the same British architect who built Liverpool Cathedral and designed the famous red British telephone booths. It was also built in the original way, only with stone except for some steel in the roof to cross brace so that flying buttresses would not be required:











St Jame's Anglican Cathedral, the second tallest church in Canada after
St Joseph's Oratory:



















 

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There are some Italianate Catholic Churches in Toronto, too. Here is one on the Danforth, in the Greek neighbourhood... but it was built for the Italian community when it was new:







Our Lady of Lourdes Roman Catholic church:









and the very pretty St Paul's Basilica that was built for the Irish Catholic community in 1887/1889 and was built closeby to Little Trinity which is the earliest church I showed before that served the Anglican community:











 

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And, of course Gothic style was so wildly popular in Victorian Toronto that many non-church buildings used it, too.



Here is Hart House which I have shown before as it has the most "Harry Potter-esque" interiors in Canada. It does look eerily like Hogwarts:















 

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Nice little summary. Your pictures make me want to walk around the Old Town again.

It's hard to believe that such a nice church at Trinity College was built in the 1950s. It seems that colleges and universities are the only places where strict adherence to building styles still goes on, since it has to match with existing buildings.
 

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I am not religious but one of my "to do" projects is to document places of worship in Toronto. We've got so many different styles and scales that I think it would be a cool project to undertake.
 

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I am not religious but one of my "to do" projects is to document places of worship in Toronto. We've got so many different styles and scales that I think it would be a cool project to undertake.
You might want to take advantage of the upcoming Doors Open event. The church interior which really amazed me was St. Georges Greek Orthadox Church on Bond Street. Quite the eye opener!
 

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I guess I could also throw in some more discussion from the Canada forums, about Norman style influence in older Toronto, and Ontario churches. St Marks Anglican in Niagara-on-the-Lake is the oldest surviving church in Ontario built in 1805. It was sacked and used for housing by the American army when they invaded the town in the War of 1812. It is a very typical Church of England country church:





Churches like that are loosely based on the style of Norman Churches, like this 12th Century Norman Church, the Church of St Nicholas, Husthwaite in the UK:



and the 13th Century St Botolph's Church, Skidbrooke, Lincolnshire.




You see a lot of similar churches in England. Here is a newer St Botolph's in Lincoln (1723 with enlargements in 1878):


http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LIN/Lincoln/lincoln_church_hist.html


Lots of churches like this in Canada, but in particular in Ontario. Here is St John's Anglican (1868) in Ancaster, Ontario:



McNab Presbyterian in Hamilton:



a nice example in Montreal, St George's Anglican (1870):



and there are many, many more examples across Canada, mostly Anglican.

The oldest church to have survived all the fires, etc.. in Toronto is Little Trinity from 1842:

 

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^^ Indeed it is! :yes: And thanks everyone for your kind comments!







Bless you my son for posting such splendid photos! It's worth noting that when built in 1897, it was originally a synagogue.
 
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