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Hot on the heels of Pinewood Toronto's Phase 2 construction start, this:

First Studio Toronto (which is in Markham lol) TV and Film production and post-production (incl. visual effects) on 20 acres - Quadrangle - Spring 2021 start

Plans have now increased to 800,000 square feet with 20 sound stages including the largest “Super Stage” in North America, which at 80,000 square feet, dwarfs the present largest on the continent - Pinewood Toronto’s Mega-Stage which is 46,000 sq ft (First Studio’s Stage 2 is also larger @50,000 sq ft).

Render (before expansion news)

UT

UT
I realize a soundstage is just a glorified warehouse but this is the entertainment industry. I wish they'd go the extra mile and make it look glamourous. Entering a movie studio there should be an aura of glitz, grandeur, and fantasy. MGM, Disneyland, Universal Studios, etc. all pay particular attention to these details because image matters. It's what they do.
 

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They should add Yonge Street to this pedestrianization project too. Total nightmare for driving.
I suspect they'll wait for the downtown Yonge Street strip to get close to built out before they turn their attention to the public realm. It should probably be pedestrian free but designed to accommodate parades, protests, etc.
 

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Good eye. I knew there was something off and that's precisely it.



Same. The shorter tower looks decent while the other I could do without.
I don't think we should dismiss the tall towers even if there is nothing special in its design. Each newer tower is another sign of Toronto's growth and potential, and they all add up to this rapidly burgeoning world-class skyline.

A tower is urban infill after all, which is always a good thing.
 

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I don't think we should dismiss the tall towers even if there is nothing special in its design. Each newer tower is another sign of Toronto's growth and potential, and they all add up to this rapidly burgeoning world-class skyline.

A tower is urban infill after all, which is always a good thing.
It echoes a growing backlash in Toronto over too many uninspired, sterile, glass boxes. After the 50th tower just like that people started losing patience. We want better designed buildings and the criticisms are bearing fruit. Standards have gotten gradually better the last 15 years. Recent proposals are better than what was being proposed just 5 years ago. If we accepted whatever developers delivered things would never improve.

I disagree on the last point. Some towers are urban infill but buildings can and should aspire to so much more than that. Good architecture has the potential to improve quality of life, inspire us, and beautify the places we call home. When people complain about buildings it speaks to the desire for these things over merely being urban infill.
 

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^^ Gorgeous. If only this could happen (much discussed when the idea surfaced 2 years ago)....

Hot on the heels of Pinewood Toronto's Phase 2 construction start, this:

First Studio Toronto (which is in Markham lol) TV and Film production and post-production (incl. visual effects) on 20 acres - Quadrangle - Spring 2021 start

Plans have now increased to 800,000 square feet with 20 sound stages including the largest “Super Stage” in North America, which at 80,000 square feet, dwarfs the present largest on the continent - Pinewood Toronto’s Mega-Stage which is 46,000 sq ft (First Studio’s Stage 2 is also larger @50,000 sq ft).

Render (before expansion news)

UT

UT

88 Queen - 163m, 94m, 91m - 51s, 28s, 27s - St Thomas Dev - Hariri Pontarini - u/c

Huge excavation nearing completion - cranes soon.


Link
If just one of those towers was a reddish hue or had some tapering for the roof it will help offset the monotony of that cluster. This same height, same colour, same shape architecture must stop now.
 

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Another terrific steveve future render, this time looking south from Bloor/Yorkville to the lake.

steveve

Plaza Midtown - 108m, 84m - 34s, 27s - Plaza - Quadrangle - u/c


UT

Plaza Midtown site construction with Pei’s 2221 Yonge (193m) topped out on the right.

NorthernLight

Durham Live (Pickering)
Follow up for my earlier post: some recent construction pics of the first phase of the 240-acre development (casino, performing arts centre, film studio, hotels, restaurants and convention centre).

Jasonzed

Jasonzed

25 Imperial Street - 12s - Plaza - pre-construction

Odd little office infill.


AlbertC

Stockyards District Residences | 36m | 10s | Marlin Spring | Graziani + Corazza - under construction

UT

AlbertC

Humber Bay with Vita on the Lake u/c @ 177m (left centre) and Eau du Soleil @ 228m wrapping up (centre).

interchange42
 

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If I may add my two cents on the subject of Toronto design innovation. As a city Toronto excels more in the realm of planning, but I can see that we are getting much better quality design (architecture, landscape architecture) than we used to and best of all our understanding of the public realm has really improved. The Eastern Waterfront will have a nice long contiguous boulevard and gorgeous parks ending with a naturalized Don river mouth replete with trees and open spaces. Would be great if we could turn Queen East or a part of Yonge into a pedestrian mall or pedestrianize Yorkville. We have also developed much more successful street tree planting techniques (continuous planting pits etc.).

Also, not only are we getting Pritzkered Star Architects building here like I.M Pei, Zaha Hadid's company, our own Frank Gehry but we have a lot of great home-based talent beyond Hariri Pontarini albeit in the form of low/medium rise high density such as Westbank's King Toronto project or the Mirvish Village redevelopment that will see a mid-block pedestrian street, lots of preserved historic buildings and some compatible higher densities along a major high order transit route. Despite our pragmatic design approach that does not yield many iconic buildings, our concept of tall building urbanism has managed to mediate the scale of tall buildings with the street level with so many attractive and human-scaled podiums making skyscrapers so much more compatible with urban life.

We should also proudly remember that we are not a backwater of urban civilization, but a leader. Our urban activists saved the Annex from the Spadina Expressway, saved Old City Hall from the wrecker's ball and saved Cabbagetown from block busting and ultimately shoddy redevelopment a la St. James Town. Toronto was a pioneer in saving historic buildings as part of site redevelopment, we have many excellent examples of reconstructions, restorations to facadectomies - Georgian on Richmond next to Shangri-La, Burgess Building at Queen and Logan and too many in the warehouse district and along Yonge to belabour the point. Our ideas have inspired so many other cities. And this is not to mention our invention of the concept of metropolitan government that aspired to solving large scale problems through cooperation within an expanded geographic city.

But it is true we have kowtowed to developers far too much fearing their departure in the early years. It's not so much that our urban designers lack backbone or talent but from what I have seen in many municipal governments, the "boys" get together in back rooms and gradually value engineer great projects into mediocre ones to boost profits so they can keep building. It is fair to say that we can't have a city full of only landmark towers and buildings, some bland inoffensive context is good for setting off the real gems like TD Centre, Scotia Plaza, Vilio Revell's New City Hall, Zeidler's innovative for its time Eaton Centre galleria and eventually the Mirvish+Gehry complex which thankfully spared the Princess of Wales, Herzog & de Meuron's slender tower at 1200 Bay and Norman Foster's rising masterpiece at Yonge and Bloor (although he's done this type of design in Warsaw and elsewhere recently).

I'm glad people are complaining a lot now but we really aren't doing that badly, we're on an amazing trajectory, as we see the value more and more of great design.
 

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If I may add my two cents on the subject of Toronto design innovation. As a city Toronto excels more in the realm of planning, but I can see that we are getting much better quality design (architecture, landscape architecture) than we used to and best of all our understanding of the public realm has really improved. The Eastern Waterfront will have a nice long contiguous boulevard and gorgeous parks ending with a naturalized Don river mouth replete with trees and open spaces. Would be great if we could turn Queen East or a part of Yonge into a pedestrian mall or pedestrianize Yorkville. We have also developed much more successful street tree planting techniques (continuous planting pits etc.).

Also, not only are we getting Pritzkered Star Architects building here like I.M Pei, Zaha Hadid's company, our own Frank Gehry but we have a lot of great home-based talent beyond Hariri Pontarini albeit in the form of low/medium rise high density such as Westbank's King Toronto project or the Mirvish Village redevelopment that will see a mid-block pedestrian street, lots of preserved historic buildings and some compatible higher densities along a major high order transit route. Despite our pragmatic design approach that does not yield many iconic buildings, our concept of tall building urbanism has managed to mediate the scale of tall buildings with the street level with so many attractive and human-scaled podiums making skyscrapers so much more compatible with urban life.

We should also proudly remember that we are not a backwater of urban civilization, but a leader. Our urban activists saved the Annex from the Spadina Expressway, saved Old City Hall from the wrecker's ball and saved Cabbagetown from block busting and ultimately shoddy redevelopment a la St. James Town. Toronto was a pioneer in saving historic buildings as part of site redevelopment, we have many excellent examples of reconstructions, restorations to facadectomies - Georgian on Richmond next to Shangri-La, Burgess Building at Queen and Logan and too many in the warehouse district and along Yonge to belabour the point. Our ideas have inspired so many other cities. And this is not to mention our invention of the concept of metropolitan government that aspired to solving large scale problems through cooperation within an expanded geographic city.

But it is true we have kowtowed to developers far too much fearing their departure in the early years. It's not so much that our urban designers lack backbone or talent but from what I have seen in many municipal governments, the "boys" get together in back rooms and gradually value engineer great projects into mediocre ones to boost profits so they can keep building. It is fair to say that we can't have a city full of only landmark towers and buildings, some bland inoffensive context is good for setting off the real gems like TD Centre, Scotia Plaza, Vilio Revell's New City Hall, Zeidler's innovative for its time Eaton Centre galleria and eventually the Mirvish+Gehry complex which thankfully spared the Princess of Wales, Herzog & de Meuron's slender tower at 1200 Bay and Norman Foster's rising masterpiece at Yonge and Bloor (although he's done this type of design in Warsaw and elsewhere recently).

I'm glad people are complaining a lot now but we really aren't doing that badly, we're on an amazing trajectory, as we see the value more and more of great design.
Sadly we don’t have the Gehry buildings and I don’t see them happening at all since Great Gulf said they would start before the end of 2018. Most of the great bank buildings are decades old and no striking gold or red skyscrapers have been built since. Enough with the 50 story flat top blue glass towers.

Each new condo can’t be a star, but we aren’t really seeing any periodic stars, we are seeing infrequent stars like one bloor west and possibly pinnacle sky tower. Yes we have tons of construction but a lot of bland architecture is a poor consolation to quality city building.
 

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While they're havent been a ton of stars, CIBC square is no doubt one of the nicest buildings in the city.

The entire pinnacle complex could be stellar. Prestige looks good so far and sky tower is very promising.

The One will also be a landmark building.

While there's plenty of bland infill in between there's plenty of middle of the road projects now that aren't stellar but definitely add reasonably high quality buildings to the city. PJ condos, 1 yorkville, Sugar Warf @ QQ, The Well, 160 Front and even the Clover on Yonge are all examples of projects that aren't stellar but are far from bad, bland or boring.
 

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The
While they're havent been a ton of stars, CIBC square is no doubt one of the nicest buildings in the city.

The entire pinnacle complex could be stellar. Prestige looks good so far and sky tower is very promising.

The One will also be a landmark building.

While there's plenty of bland infill in between there's plenty of middle of the road projects now that aren't stellar but definitely add reasonably high quality buildings to the city. PJ condos, 1 yorkville, Sugar Warf @ QQ, The Well, 160 Front and even the Clover on Yonge are all examples of projects that aren't stellar but are far from bad, bland or boring.
One can only hope that there’s is enough buildable sites left for more interesting and colourful architecture to offset the plethora of grey-green-blue glass boxes, so in the years to come those boxes wind up being in the minority. Sadly, Concord city place will always be a reminder of our lost years.
 

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If I may add my two cents on the subject of Toronto design innovation. As a city Toronto excels more in the realm of planning, but I can see that we are getting much better quality design (architecture, landscape architecture) than we used to and best of all our understanding of the public realm has really improved. The Eastern Waterfront will have a nice long contiguous boulevard and gorgeous parks ending with a naturalized Don river mouth replete with trees and open spaces. Would be great if we could turn Queen East or a part of Yonge into a pedestrian mall or pedestrianize Yorkville. We have also developed much more successful street tree planting techniques (continuous planting pits etc.).

Also, not only are we getting Pritzkered Star Architects building here like I.M Pei, Zaha Hadid's company, our own Frank Gehry but we have a lot of great home-based talent beyond Hariri Pontarini albeit in the form of low/medium rise high density such as Westbank's King Toronto project or the Mirvish Village redevelopment that will see a mid-block pedestrian street, lots of preserved historic buildings and some compatible higher densities along a major high order transit route. Despite our pragmatic design approach that does not yield many iconic buildings, our concept of tall building urbanism has managed to mediate the scale of tall buildings with the street level with so many attractive and human-scaled podiums making skyscrapers so much more compatible with urban life.

We should also proudly remember that we are not a backwater of urban civilization, but a leader. Our urban activists saved the Annex from the Spadina Expressway, saved Old City Hall from the wrecker's ball and saved Cabbagetown from block busting and ultimately shoddy redevelopment a la St. James Town. Toronto was a pioneer in saving historic buildings as part of site redevelopment, we have many excellent examples of reconstructions, restorations to facadectomies - Georgian on Richmond next to Shangri-La, Burgess Building at Queen and Logan and too many in the warehouse district and along Yonge to belabour the point. Our ideas have inspired so many other cities. And this is not to mention our invention of the concept of metropolitan government that aspired to solving large scale problems through cooperation within an expanded geographic city.

But it is true we have kowtowed to developers far too much fearing their departure in the early years. It's not so much that our urban designers lack backbone or talent but from what I have seen in many municipal governments, the "boys" get together in back rooms and gradually value engineer great projects into mediocre ones to boost profits so they can keep building. It is fair to say that we can't have a city full of only landmark towers and buildings, some bland inoffensive context is good for setting off the real gems like TD Centre, Scotia Plaza, Vilio Revell's New City Hall, Zeidler's innovative for its time Eaton Centre galleria and eventually the Mirvish+Gehry complex which thankfully spared the Princess of Wales, Herzog & de Meuron's slender tower at 1200 Bay and Norman Foster's rising masterpiece at Yonge and Bloor (although he's done this type of design in Warsaw and elsewhere recently).

I'm glad people are complaining a lot now but we really aren't doing that badly, we're on an amazing trajectory, as we see the value more and more of great design.
What a refreshing post... thank you. Makes the almost daily effort of copy, paste, link... and repeat ad nauseum worth it. :)

On the topic of infill, there are some very fine mid-rises scattered through my next 2 posts (first post below).

Grand Central Mimico - 123m, 89m, 46m - 37s, 26s, 12s - VANDYK Group - Kohn - pre-construction

New rendering.


UT

CIBC SQUARE - 238m - 49s - Hines - WilkinsonEyre - u/c

Very unique shot of the glazing.


thirdeye

“The Well” (174m) u/c at night. First floors of the residential towers (157m + 136m) starting to appear.


isotack

Pinnacle One Yonge - 312.5m - 95s - Pinnacle - Hariri Pontarini - u/c

Excavation for the super tall with Phase 1 (“Prestige”) rising behind.


Full Metal Junkie

Wiggly aluminum cladding elements on Prestige starting to wiggle.

mburrrrr


West Condos - 52.m - 14s - Aspen Ridge - Core Architects - u/c

Really looking forward to this restoration and build in this neighbourhood.


Red Mars

UT

ANX - 48m - 13s - Freed - Teeple Architects - site demolition about to begin


UT

UT

Location near Casa Loma (near centre of the pic)

UT

1181 Queen Street West - 55m - 15s - Skale - Quadrangle - u/c


UT

UT

AlbertC

UT

Park Hyatt Renovation - 62.5m - 18s - Oxford Properties - KPMB - u/c


Northern Light

Northern Light
 

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Part 2


Artists' Alley - 122m, 112m, 59m - 39s, 35s, 17s - Lanterra - Hariri Pontarini - u/c

Closer to grade.


Tacoma

UT

Westport Condos - ?m - 22s - Edenshaw - IBI Group - site-prep


UT

Lake Ontario

Aquavista at Bayside - 47m - 13s | Tridel - Arquitectonica - nearly complete


globalexpress

globalexpress

41 River Street - 18m - 5s - Percy Ellis - Studio JCI - u/c


UT

AlbertC

Regent Park: Block 16 North | 44m | 12s | TCHC | RAW Design - site shoring


AlbertC

UT

2500 Yonge - 50m - 14s - Madison Group - Turner Fleischer - site plan approval submission


UT
 

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What a refreshing post... thank you. Makes the almost daily effort of copy, paste, link... and repeat ad nauseum worth it. :)
You're most welcome elliot - your regular posts wake me up more than good coffee. Keep up the good work.
:)
 

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Geesh, is that a double height 20ft ceiling in that penthouse living room?
 

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Vaughan Metropolitan Centre

SmartCentres Q1 2020 Investor Presentation depicts a conceptual massing:
  • A NEW CITY CENTRE
  • Potential for 20 million square feet of mixed-use
  • SmartCentres owned lands (25 acres) represent 5 million sf. of potential
  • 2 million+ square feet currently under construction

748990

 

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10 years ago Vaughan was just single family homes and parking lots. cant believe the growth.
It might morph into one of the Greater Golden Horseshoe's best nodes/mini downtowns.
 

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Park Hyatt Renovation - 62.5m - 18s - Oxford Properties - KPMB - u/c


Northern Light

Northern Light
It looks so grand and helps anchor the neighbourhood. Too bad that 13 floor cream building on the north end didn't match the historic renovated Park Hyatt at the south end (Avenue and Bloor) with a matching adjoining section in the middle. If it did we could have another Royal York Hotel look alike at this end of the downtown.
 

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120 Church - 149m - 45s - Madison Group - Teeple Architects - pre-construction

UT

UT

263 Adelaide Street West - 157m - 47s - Lanterra - Quadrangle(?)

Lanterra purchased this project/property nearly a year ago and just released a ‘teaser’ rendering of the lower floors of the re-designed tower. Not sure if it’s still a rental build or if Quadrangle is still the AoR.


ProjectEnd

110 Adelaide Street East - 145m - 42s - SvN - pre-construction

Difficult to see in the render, but the podium and some tower floors have arch elements (see elevation).


UT

UT

321 Davenport - 37m - 9s - Alterra - Giannone Petricone - pre-construction


UT

AlbertC

2525 Bathurst Street - 49m - 13s - IBI Group - site prep

Rental building on Bathurst north of Eglinton.


UT

1354 Queen Street West - 33m - 9s - KingSett Capital - Giannone Petricone - pre-construction

UT
 
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