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Towns & Small Cities of England & Wales

35961 Views 199 Replies 35 Participants Last post by  cardiff
Welcome to this new thread where I will showcase my photos from towns and small cities (where I haven't taken enough photos to warrant their own thread) around England and Wales.
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Bath look very beautifull. Thanks for posting.
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Just found this thread, nice stuff. Spent most of my childhood in Wiltshire so can very much relate to the comments about places being nice but boring to live in.
Got any photos of Shaftesbury? Always liked going there.
Thanks! It's a gem and well worth a visit. :)

Bath look very beautifull. Thanks for posting.
Just found this thread, nice stuff. Spent most of my childhood in Wiltshire so can very much relate to the comments about places being nice but boring to live in.
Got any photos of Shaftesbury? Always liked going there.
It's great to have access to all these places but I just couldn't live there, not at this stage in my life anyway. Sadly I do not, but it's certainly on my list of places to visit. :)
Ahh Bath, I've been there twice and now I'm thinking maybe I need to revisit it!
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I'll never tire of Bath personally. :)
Ahh Bath, I've been there twice and now I'm thinking maybe I need to revisit it!
Birmingham
WEST MIDLANDS

These photos were taken on Saturday 28th March 2015. I realise this thread is about small cities but I would quite like to change the title to just cities as there aren't enough photos to dedicate to an entire thread.

Birmingham is a city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands. It is the largest and most populous British city outside London with 1,123,330 residents (2014 est.), and its population increase of 88,400 residents between the 2001 and 2011 censuses was greater than that of any other British local authority. The city lies within the West Midlands Built-up Area, the third most populous built-up area in the United Kingdom with 2,440,986 residents (2011 census), and its metropolitan area is the United Kingdom's second most populous with 3,701,107 residents (2012 est.) and is also the 9th largest metropolitan area in Europe.

A medium-sized market town during the medieval period, Birmingham grew to international prominence in the 18th century at the heart of the Midlands Enlightenment and subsequent Industrial Revolution, which saw the town at the forefront of worldwide advances in science, technology and economic development, producing a series of innovations that laid many of the foundations of modern industrial society. By 1791 it was being hailed as "the first manufacturing town in the world". Birmingham's distinctive economic profile, with thousands of small workshops practising a wide variety of specialised and highly skilled trades, encouraged exceptional levels of creativity and innovation and provided a diverse and resilient economic base for industrial prosperity that was to last into the final quarter of the 20th century. Its resulting high level of social mobility also fostered a culture of broad-based political radicalism, that under leaders from Thomas Attwood to Joseph Chamberlain was to give it a political influence unparalleled in Britain outside London, and a pivotal role in the development of British democracy. From the summer of 1940 to the spring of 1943, Birmingham was bombed heavily by the German Luftwaffe in what is known as the Birmingham Blitz. The damage done to the city's infrastructure led to extensive redevelopment in subsequent decades.

Today Birmingham's economy is dominated by the service sector. The city is a major international commercial centre, ranked as a beta− world city by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network; and an important transport, retail, events and conference hub. Its metropolitan economy is the second largest in the United Kingdom with a GDP of $121.1bn (2014), and its six universities make it the largest centre of higher education in the country outside London. Birmingham's major cultural institutions – including the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, the Birmingham Royal Ballet, the Birmingham Repertory Theatre, the Library of Birmingham and the Barber Institute of Fine Arts – enjoy international reputations, and the city has vibrant and influential grassroots art, music, literary and culinary scenes. Birmingham is the fourth-most visited city in the UK by foreign visitors.

People from Birmingham are called 'Brummies', a term derived from the city's nickname of 'Brum'. This originates from the city's dialect name, Brummagem, which may in turn have been derived from one of the city's earlier names, 'Bromwicham'. There is a distinctive Brummie accent and dialect.

More information here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birmingham



















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Good to see some images of Birmingham; a city which we do not see enough of on SSC.
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^^ I agree. There's a lot on offer in Birmingham with heaps of potential. I was quite impressed with the city overall actually. :)
impressive cities and the old designed buildings are massively built.
Nice pics.
impressive cities and the old designed buildings are massively built.
Thanks very much! :)
The thread is for towns and small cities NOT big cities Birmingham is the second biggest city in the UK. "Good pics though"
He does acknowledge that tbf.

I've been to central Birmingham, as I've visited my brother at Uni (plus been through New Street as we all have!)
Birmingham to me, at least these days, is an interesting, if not quite unique place. The architectural styles of the city centre, seems quite unique to me. Most of the oldest buildings, in my eyes anyway, seem to be of something of a blend of Vic. Gothic and Baroque, such as the City Hall, and St. Philips Cathedral. I know there are other older styles too, I've seen Art Deco and regular Vic. Gothic styles too, but the style I mentioned previously seems quite unique to the city. Personally, I'm very impressed with the new developments, i.e the new Bullring, Library and redeveloped New Street, all very good examples of contemporary architecture.

It's still far from a beautiful city however. Still got a pretty poor public realm, and the streets feel quite dirty and tired in places. Plus I'm sure we're all aware of the awful architecture thrown up in the 50s/60s/70s, that's still very prominent in the city centre. Not to mention its labyrinth of A roads/ Motorways! I'm glad that's changing however; personally I'll be glad to see the old concrete Central Library gone. Paradise circus looks like it'll be magnificent when it's finished. The two buildings from that era I can say I really do like however, are the Symphony Hall and Rep theatre. They have good proportion and styling, and seem to have aged well.
The thread is for towns and small cities NOT big cities Birmingham is the second biggest city in the UK. "Good pics though"
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Yes thanks for that, I did after all open the thread... I would like to take out the 'small' from the title so as to reflect general places across the country. :)

The thread is for towns and small cities NOT big cities Birmingham is the second biggest city in the UK. "Good pics though"
He does acknowledge that tbf.

I've been to central Birmingham, as I've visited my brother at Uni (plus been through New Street as we all have!)
Birmingham to me, at least these days, is an interesting, if not quite unique place. The architectural styles of the city centre, seems quite unique to me. Most of the oldest buildings, in my eyes anyway, seem to be of something of a blend of Vic. Gothic and Baroque, such as the City Hall, and St. Philips Cathedral. I know there are other older styles too, I've seen Art Deco and regular Vic. Gothic styles too, but the style I mentioned previously seems quite unique to the city. Personally, I'm very impressed with the new developments, i.e the new Bullring, Library and redeveloped New Street, all very good examples of contemporary architecture.

It's still far from a beautiful city however. Still got a pretty poor public realm, and the streets feel quite dirty and tired in places. Plus I'm sure we're all aware of the awful architecture thrown up in the 50s/60s/70s, that's still very prominent in the city centre. Not to mention its labyrinth of A roads/ Motorways! I'm glad that's changing however; personally I'll be glad to see the old concrete Central Library gone. Paradise circus looks like it'll be magnificent when it's finished. The two buildings from that era I can say I really do like however, are the Symphony Hall and Rep theatre. They have good proportion and styling, and seem to have aged well.
I would tend to agree. Many people's impressions of Birmingham are based upon the sight one sees when driving by on the motorway or passing on the train but Birmingham is really full of architectural gems. Like you say, and for me, the downside is all the brutalist trash that sprouted up after the war (that generation really bore so awful architects and planners!) :)
Very good shots Of Birmingham, Mike. I hope there`s more.
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Very good, very nice updates; well done once again :cheers:
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Thanks Paul! There are indeed more to come. :)

Very good shots Of Birmingham, Mike. I hope there`s more.
Very good, very nice updates; well done once again :cheers:
Thanks mate! :)
Great pics, lovely to see Birmingham as not many pictures exist of it on this site. It has some amazing islands of architecture that thread between brutalist developments which thankfully are being redeveloped into amazing unique buildings and spaces. From my first visit to my last I can see a definite desire and attempt to resolve the issues with the layout of post war development and improvement of the city center, and the newest developments look to resolve the most major of the city centers problems and could turn it into one of the best and attractive places to live and work.
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