Skyscraper City Forum banner
1 - 20 of 51 Posts

·
Home Energy Reactor
Joined
·
7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Traffic accidents and laws

http://www.phnompenhpost.com/index.php/2012072757665/National-news/traffic-accidents-and-laws.html


Riding around the city of Phnom Penh can sometimes be challenging. Whether your mode of transportation is a car, tuk tuk, motorbike or a bicycle, the traffic is horrendous, and sharing the road with all types of transportation can be dangerous.

Traffic accidents are one of the leading causes of death in Cambodia. Speeding and drunk driving are the main causes, and motorbikes are the most common vehicle involved in traffic accidents.

The traffic laws in Cambodia are not regularly enforced. There are police officers on most busy street corners, but the only time you see police officers working are when they stop drivers and fine them for petty traffic violations. Due to the police officers’ low monthly salaries, often the money (fines) is pocketed, and they also charge foreigners more than locals.

Why do the law enforcers target foreigners? It’s because the foreigners do not want to hassle with this and will pay whatever the police officers ask.

For the locals, they will stay and bargain with the law enforcers until the police officers are frustrated and let the locals pay for what they asked, just to get them out of their hair, so they can focus on collecting more fines.

Try to bargain first, and ask for a receipt after you pay the fine. Yes, corruption in the police system exists in Cambodia. In other developing countries, the corruption is hidden.

Getting into a traffic accident can be a traumatic experience, both physical and emotional.

Major fatalities are from road accidents which involves tour buses travelling throughout the country and getting hit by drunk drivers, especially at night. Some are driven by 17- and 18-year-olds, without a driver’s licence, and driving under the influence of alcohol.

As a result, many insurance companies have stopped selling insurance to the bus companies, and the government is not doing anything about it.

This issue is not on the government’s priority list, despite the fact that traffic accidents claimed more than 2,000 lives in 2010, according to the World Health Organization.

Road safety programs have been implemented by several organisations to bring awareness and education to this growing issue.

It is very important to wear a helmet when riding a motorbike. Handicap International stated that more than 80 per cent of fatalities are due to head injuries. The road safety public awareness campaign for helmet safety has been effective, and the number of riders wearing helmets has doubled this year.

Another road traffic law being enforced is wearing a seat belt. This is common practice in Western countries, and many do follow this law in Cambodia. But what if the car you are in does not have seat belts?

Most of the vehicles are second-hand cars and many would not pass safety standards, or they are vehicles that were in major crashes and only the exterior of the car was fixed before being imported from other countries.

The government needs to intervene in traffic regulations and the traffic laws which include major violations like drunk driving and speeding, which need to be strictly enforced.

I remember what my former driver education teacher taught me when I was learning how to drive a car in the US – be proactive and not reactive.
 

·
Home Energy Reactor
Joined
·
7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Another road traffic law being enforced is wearing a seat belt. This is common practice in Western countries, and many do follow this law in Cambodia. But what if the car you are in does not have seat belts?
The answer is simple, if the car has no seat belt, it should not be on the road.

The question is not if the car has seat belt, it is how do you plan to install 25 seat belt in a van design to seat 8? How do you make sure the 100 people standing at the back of a ute traveling to and back from the factory is safe?
 

·
Home Energy Reactor
Joined
·
7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Most of the vehicles are second-hand cars and many would not pass safety standards, or they are vehicles that were in major crashes and only the exterior of the car was fixed before being imported from other countries.
Cars older then 5 years need to be inspected every 12 month.

The inspector will be prosecuted if traffic accident occur due to non-roadworthy vehicles.
 

·
Home Energy Reactor
Joined
·
7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The government needs to intervene in traffic regulations and the traffic laws which include major violations like drunk driving and speeding, which need to be strictly enforced.
We can start off with ensure all alcohol selling places has licensed and make sure the customer don't drink too much, and start taxing alcohol.

If it cost more, people will drink less.
 

·
Home Energy Reactor
Joined
·
7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Some are driven by 17- and 18-year-olds, without a driver’s licence, and driving under the influence of alcohol.
I have seen 14yo driving a motocycle.

Also, there are many pushbike on the road, why don't they have to wear helmet?
 

·
Home Energy Reactor
Joined
·
7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Push for new traffic law
http://www.phnompenhpost.com/index.php/2012080357799/National-news/push-for-new-traffic-law.html

A draft traffic law that has been as gridlocked in parliament as a traffic jam on Monivong Boulevard during peak hour could be closer to being green-lighted.

The National Road Safety Committee yesterday urged officials from multiple ministries to hasten approval of the new traffic law, which has been with the Council of Ministers for about two years.

Public Works and Transport Minister Tram Iv Tek, who also chairs the NRSC, told attendees at a workshop at the Sunway Hotel that the previous traffic law, which came into force in 2007, was overly complex, adding that a new law would both streamline the code and improve safety on Cambodia’s roads after the traffic death toll nearly reached 2,000 in 2011.

“The draft of the new traffic law came to existence after it was amended due to the complexity of the content of the old one,” he said, adding that the new traffic law also aims to make enforcement easier.

The new law will be sent to the National Assembly soon, Iv Tek added. According to a preliminary report from Road Crash and Victim Information System, accidents caused by driver error accounted for 95 per cent of collisions, with almost half resulting from speeding. Motorbike riders accounted for two thirds of casualties.

Khan Savoeun, secretary of state at the Ministry of Interior, said the ministry had done its best to revise the law many times to avert traffic problems.

“The majority of traffic accidents are caused by buses, vehicles carrying workers and carts which are always overloaded,” he said.

“Also, most of the passengers sit on the vehicle’s roof or don’t even fasten their seatbelt. The national police will equip all provinces with speed-controlling devices.”

Almost 70 per cent of all road fatalities resulted from head injuries, prompting Prime Minister Hun Sen himself to issue a video clip airing at the workshop and on a number of TV channels appealing to people to wear their helmets.
 

·
Home Energy Reactor
Joined
·
7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The National Road Safety Committee yesterday urged officials from multiple ministries to hasten approval of the new traffic law, which has been with the Council of Ministers for about two years.
What exactly is the problem, why do we need new traffic law?

The problem is existing traffic law is not enforced, new traffic law will be just as ineffective if it is not enforced.
 

·
Home Energy Reactor
Joined
·
7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
“The majority of traffic accidents are caused by buses, vehicles carrying workers and carts which are always overloaded,” he said.
Ban overloaded vehicles.
 

·
Home Energy Reactor
Joined
·
7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
“Also, most of the passengers sit on the vehicle’s roof or don’t even fasten their seatbelt. The national police will equip all provinces with speed-controlling devices.”
Ban people sitting on the top of van or on top of overloaded trucks.

Ban overloaded Tuk Tuk.
 

·
Home Energy Reactor
Joined
·
7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The national police will equip all provinces with speed-controlling devices
I heard some rumors we used to have it, but the top government officials are the one that want it remove because they always get caught.
 

·
In the br i g
Joined
·
2,250 Posts
mrfusion said:
I heard some rumors we used to have it, but the top government officials are the one that want it remove because they always get caught.
Exactly. They are the ones who break the laws and they don't care. More laws would still not work.
 

·
Srok Khmer !
Joined
·
1,032 Posts
One of the most serious problems in Malaysia and ASEAN



According to the United Nations World Health Organisation's Global Status Report on Road Safety, Malaysia tops the Asean chart for having the highest road fatalities per 100,000 population.

Singapore has the lowest but this is mainly attributed to its very high level of public transport usage.

For a nation having great pride in its home grown automotive industry, it is very embarrassing for Malaysians to be known as the worst drivers in the region.

Between 1996 and 2009, Malaysia's motor vehicle population increased by almost three times, from 6.8 million vehicles to 19 million vehicles. At the same time, traffic fatalities per 100,000 population decreased by 20 per cent.

Road fatalities in Malaysia peaked in 1996 (30 deaths per 100,000 population) and the current figure of 23.6 is a 15-year low.

In March 2010, Malaysia, along with over 100 countries adopted a draft resolution proclaiming the period 2011-2020 as the Decade of Action for Road Safety.

Not many are aware that Malaysian actress Michelle Yeoh is a Global Ambassador for the UN Decade of Action for Road Safety's “Make Roads Safe” campaign.



While Malaysia may have the highest road fatality per capita in the region, our saving grace is that Miros is putting Malaysia at the forefront of road safety promotion initiatives.

MyVAP is the first of its kind to be implemented in Asean.

Thailand, despite its reputation as an automobile manufacturing powerhouse, is rather far behind in bringing its vehicle safety regulation standards up to par with the rest of the world.

For example, in Malaysia, before a new model can be sold in Malaysia, it has to undergo what is known as Vehicle Type Approval (VTA), ensuring that it complies to the necessary safety regulations.

Malaysia's VTA mirrors that practised in Europe. Vehicles sold in Thailand are not required to undergo similar VTA.

Read Full Story >>> http://www.cbt.com.my/2012/07/13/a-decade-of-action-for-road-safety/
Still couldn't belive this...
Its not true or ???
I would think that Cambodia is on the second place or somehting but maybe its because the not so high population or the informations of Cambodian traffic are false
 

·
Home Energy Reactor
Joined
·
7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Still couldn't belive this...
Its not true or ???
I would think that Cambodia is on the second place or somehting but maybe its because the not so high population or the informations of Cambodian traffic are false
I read earlier Cambodia has 4-5 people die on the road every day,

The above say we have 12 fatality per 100,000, based on 14million people, it works out to be 4.6 death per day.

Majority of accidant we see in Cambodia are low speed collision, so prehaps is not as likely to be fatal.
 

·
Home Energy Reactor
Joined
·
7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Reckless drivers cause mayhem on Phnom Penh's streets

http://www.phnompenhpost.com/index....eel-all-out-honking-and-reckless-driving.html

Traffic is definitely one of the many distinct features of the city. But traffic comes with a price tag: absolute lack of courtesy for fellow drivers and accidents.
Talking on a cell phone while driving or honking rage indicates lack of courtesy from drivers. It is an attitude police forces along with the government seem unwilling to take measures against or regulate.

Thorn Leakhena, 25, works at the Institute of Foreign Languages: “Traffic is getting worse,” he says. “People do not care and have no respect for motorbikes, riders or pedestrians. I cannot help it. I do blame all car drivers honking inappropriately. I remember that one time, a driver honked at me while he was on the wrong side of the road, driving against traffic!

“When you are driving an expensive powerful car or motorcycle, you should behave and respect other people,” he says.

Talking on the cell phone falls in the category of driver behavior’s deviancies.

Khin Lyda, 20, is a 4th year student at the University of Health and Science.

“All those drivers on the phone while behind the wheel always lose control of their vehicle”, she says. “Their car sways, zigzags, can cause an accident and incidentally, traffic jams,” she says with anger.

Pannha owns a nice car and admits he is a daredevil on the road but insists he has reasons for it.

“Sometimes, I honk like crazy because I am on a hurry. honking tells other drivers that you’re there. Talking on the phone while driving is very common. I do it, so does everyone. I do not feel I am breaking the law in any way.”

As a friendly reminder, talking on a cell-phone while driving and honking excessively are not just against basic courtesy, but can also cause traffic accidents.

According to a 2011 World Health Organization’s research, talking on a cell-phone and driving at the same time greatly increase the likelihood of having an accident. This has raised concerns in many countries across the globe for effective solutions.

Research has shown that talking on a cell-phone while driving induces low concentration, slower reaction time to jams or traffic lights, significant visual impairment and impossibility to focus and/or control the vehicle. All of these increase road accidents.

“In fact, talking on the phone while driving and unnecessary blaring honking are already part of new traffic laws which are unfortunately still not enforced”, says BunCheaun, a police officer in Phnom Penh.

Turning to an organization, Handicap, working on road safety in Cambodia, Ear Chariya, research monitoring and evaluation coordinator Road Safety program, said, he encourage the government do some action with the issue of phone talking while driving and inappropriate horning, since he knows that these two problems would not leave the road safe as the policies of the Ministry of Public Works and Transportation.

Chariya added that sometimes driver may think that they are expert or good enough in controlling their vehicle, but they might have never realized that just a minute on the phone would transfer them into risk. Beeping is annoying and can damage other drivers’ concentration; the horns of big cars are most harmful.

Monyroth, a Red Cross volunteer who educates people on traffic laws, recommends to always use earphone when driving. Respecting the law is not enough. Drivers should always be aware of their attitude.
 

·
Home Energy Reactor
Joined
·
7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
“Sometimes, I honk like crazy because I am on a hurry. honking tells other drivers that you’re there. Talking on the phone while driving is very common. I do it, so does everyone. I do not feel I am breaking the law in any way.”
He is not breaking the law because there is no law to ban mobile usage, but it should be introduce, together with dozens of other traffic issues.
 

·
Home Energy Reactor
Joined
·
7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hit-and-run traffic accidents

http://www.phnompenhpost.com/index.php/2012112159867/LIFT/hit-and-run-traffic-accidents.html

Accidents happen all the time in every place. Most of the time in a car crash situation, the driver that caused it, presuming the victims’ relatives or the victim herself or himself can potentially sue for compensation, runs off.

Irresponsibility is becoming a habit now in Cambodian. How to determine the driver’s and/or the passenger’s liability in case of accident due to negligent driving and how to factor all the elements in?

Ngoun So Vitou survived from a serious traffic accident. He tells us about his experience: “I got hit by a car and got knocked unconscious. I ended up with serious injuries. The bad driver took off. When finally I was able to stand back on my feet, I was furious with this guy. I wanted to know why he’d done that to me and especially why he did not fulfill his moral obligation of acknowledgement and fled.”

Ith Srey recalls similar experiences. “My mother recently got in a traffic accident. She was on the highway with her husband and got bumped into from behind by another motorbike and fell down on the road. The biker was totally oblivious, disappeared and left us in the lurch.”

“For sure, I am used to this. People are wary they will have to reimburse for all incurred costs but in my case, I wanted him to say “I’m sorry” and acknowledge the damage. Only a real man can stand his grounds and make a point in showing responsibility for what he does. That’s it!” says Srey Mom.

Si Teoun is a retired police officer with more than 20 years of experience in traffic accidents intervention cases. He says that up until now, bad drivers are more enticed to running the risk to escape than facing possible lawsuits, indictment and compensation.

Si Teoun says that “When those bad drivers do not vanish, a lot of the times it is because they get themselves injured as well and just cannot get away on time before the police arrives. On very rare occasions will you see an irresponsible driver stick around and wait for the cops to show up. This is a personal observation”.

On the other hand, Keo Sovannarith is a student in his last year of a public administration program. He sank into a heavy depression following a road accident he got involved in. He had to face subsequent hit-and-run accusations.

“I felt so bad, it was his fault, he had to act responsibly. I was really wondering whether he was aware he had narrowly escaped a terrible fate”.

According to articles # 69 to 90 from the Land Traffic legislation, penalties depend on the gravity of the situation and the driver’s general behavior.

Responsibility can either be civil or criminal and hinges on physical and material damage done to people and/or the vehicle.

Article # 82 of the Traffic Law refers to a person who unintentionally causes death while driving.

The person shall be then sentenced from to 1 to 3 years in jail. She or he could also face a fine ranging from 2 to 6 million riels. The person can also face both penalties.

If the driver escapes and gets caught at a later time and found guilty in court, severe legal sentences are handed down.

The law, however, does not mention anything about basic hit-and-run and liability in such case.

The SAO Deluxe a student from the Transnational Law and Business program at a South Korean university suggests that: “Administrative changes are necessary. If the law were enforced strictly on the matter, drivers would not have a single chance to escape. Things could change in 3 simple steps: strict law enforcement, penalty provisions amendment, and public awareness promotion.”

On the other hand, Sovannarith hopes institutions and the Cambodian society will unequivocally deal with this issue by providing more accurate information about traffic law and responsible driving in schools.

The Ministry of Public Works and Transportation could set up a vehicle ownership tracking system.

This would greatly help the police to identify the driver of the incriminated vehicle in a car crash.
 

·
Home Energy Reactor
Joined
·
7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
What’s your stance on vehicle insurance?
http://www.phnompenhpost.com/index....T/whats-your-stance-on-vehicle-insurance.html

Say Lalin, 21 years old, student at the Royal University of Phnom Penh

“Driving a vehicle under an insurance policy is not important. It all depends on the driver’s skills on the road and how good she or he is. Careless drivers will be accident-prone. Besides, insurance companies will not cover any accident-related cost or be of any help if the driver’s responsibility is involved in any breach of the insurance policy contract or did not fully abide by it.”
 

·
Home Energy Reactor
Joined
·
7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Is vehicle insurance compulsory in Cambodia? I think it should.

If you can't afford insurance, you can't afford to drive.
 

·
Home Energy Reactor
Joined
·
7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
1 - 20 of 51 Posts
Top