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Trains put cities on track to boom
Bob Schwartz
April 18, 2006
LET'S start with the obvious: infrastructure, or the lack of it, significantly influences the value of retail property.
Now the not-so obvious: the value of retail properties in fast-growing parts of Sydney will be higher than their equivalents in the fast-growing parts of southeast Queensland, as Sydney's transport infrastructure boosts values.

Between 2000 and 2005, the population increase in the Sydney and Brisbane metropolitan areas was almost exactly the same, about 190,000 people.

Furthermore, the population density of each broad region has remained roughly similar. There are about 380 people per square kilometre living in Brisbane, while 350sq/km live in Sydney.

The key difference between the two capitals is that Sydney's growth has blossomed around the extensive, existing, high-capacity transport infrastructure. Sydney is in a much better position to sustainably handle growth. Southeast Queensland, on the other hand, does not have such a comprehensive system in place.

Brisbane and Auckland are examples of urban areas that grew up in spite of inadequate rail, water and road infrastructure.

As a result, population growth and the subsequent travel patterns in these cities have been higgledy-piggledy.

This in turn makes investing in new transport infrastructure more difficult because entrenched interests and the "not in my back yard" syndrome obstruct the process.

Transport infrastructure affects the value of a retail property development by influencing the number of people within a trade area and increasing their wealth.

The net effect is that turnover, and therefore income, is higher and more sustainable. The easier it is to get to a shopping centre, the more people will frequent it.

Secondly, areas that grow because existing high-capacity infrastructure is already in place have higher housing values.

Much work has been done in the US to verify this latter claim.

In the San Francisco Bay area the introduction of a heavy rail network had a strong positive effect on property values, because the railroad was built, for the most part, in the median strip of the existing freeway system, causing no further degradation of neighbourhoods and suburbs while increasing the desirability of those areas.

Miami, on the other hand, introduced a commuter rail service along its existing rail freight lines. The tracks were inland, but the city and region grew up along the coast. The rail terminal was away from the CBD. Not surprisingly, this transport infrastructure did little for house prices.

In Sydney, better transport infrastructure means bigger trade areas for a typical shopping centre.

Furthermore, the housing wealth effect flowing from better infrastructure will increase long-term turnover growth more than would otherwise be the case.

I expect that Sydney's expansion and extension of its transport networks will work much more like the experience in San Francisco.

The flip side is that in southeast Queensland more shopping centres will be developed because the transport system is being built after the fact, ensuring that the average trade area will be smaller than its cousin down south.

Equally, the wealth effect will be less here, as the homeowners who will be affected by the construction of new infrastructure will endure a material degradation of their surrounding environment, thus lowering values.

The indications are that southeast Queensland will more closely follow Miami's example and find that improvements in the transport system will come too late to boost housing and retail property values.
 

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^^^^^

Thats right.The areas of pressing concern are the South West/North West,the dense areas of the Eastern suburbs and of course the transport wasteland of the Northern Beaches.
 

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jarf said:
I'm going to agree with the article; Brisbane is very poorly served by rail. There hasn't been any major rail expansion for how long now?
Helensvale: 1996
Extension to Nerang: 1997
Extension to Robina: 1998
Airport Line: 2002(?)

Anyway, for what is serviced by rail in Brisbane, it is well utilised. Construction is udnerway for the Duplication from Helensvale <> Nerang, the duplication of Mitchelton <> Keperra and triplication of Salisbury <> Kuraby. As well as the Springfield line which will branch off at Darra and possible consideration of Rail to Browns Plains via Acacia Ridge.
 

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Anyway, aside from the fact this article looks as if to be written by a fourteen year old and the message of it is painfully obvious, why is there no mention of building around EXISTING railway lines, rather than building away from them and then expecting it to be built in an already built-up area. Haven't people learned anything from the sixties?
 

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New Urbanist
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O my god!!! you have to be kidding me!! that's hilarious! firstly that article doesn't say anything about building Urban Villages over the existing stations as you can find here you guys down south don't really get our news here so you don't have a great overview about our infrastructure plans! We have so many new infrastructure projects on the way... There are so many i can't be bothered to name them.. :lol:

Also that article is rather dodgy, you know growth doesn't just revolve around rail... there is a little thing called a busway ;)
 

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Practically no effect.

Urban development tends to be remote from freeways and thus the typical Australian rail system that lacks feeder buses has few transit oriented development oportunities and even fewer non-oriented houses offering walk-in customers.

As such, freeways are the last place a sane planner would build rail lines (unless it's just a quick bypass from afar, and even then the environmental benefits of rail over redevelopment closer in need to be reexamined).
 

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MrPC said:
Practically no effect.

Urban development tends to be remote from freeways and thus the typical Australian rail system that lacks feeder buses has few transit oriented development oportunities and even fewer non-oriented houses offering walk-in customers.

As such, freeways are the last place a sane planner would build rail lines (unless it's just a quick bypass from afar, and even then the environmental benefits of rail over redevelopment closer in need to be reexamined).
MrPC, do you think that Perth's Northern Suburbs Railway Line was a mistake? From what I gather, it's been an outstanding success, carrying as many passengers as Perth's three other rail lines combined, roughly breaking even on operating costs and about 25% of those using it were previously driving. It has attracted substantial patronage because many of the stations have bus interchanges directly above them, making transferring from one mode to another very easy. The feeder bus services also create larger passenger catchment areas than would be the case if the stations relied mainly on passengers walking to the stations. Frequent train service also attracts large numbers of passengers too, of course.
 

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Between 2004-05 and 2008-09, Main Roads will spend $A8 billion on Queensland's road infrastructure.

The works are funded under the Roads Implementation Program (RIP), the department's rolling five-year works program, which seeks to provide Queensland's residents and visitors with a safe and efficient road network.

The program is a response to the significant economic and population growth taking place across the state but particularly in the south-east corner. Overall, the program is a $A2.1 billion increase over last year's RIP.

The Roads Infrastructure Program will also benefit the state's economy, creating 5,100 new jobs and ongoing employment for 17,500 Queenslanders - a record total of 22,600 jobs.
 

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Damn... So has anyone heard anything about a kiama bypass yet? I was reading a wollongong street directory and it said it would be build by late 2006.
 

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and rail

In April 2005, the Queensland Government announced a $55 billion blueprint for upgrading a range of infrastructure in South East Queensland (SEQ). The South East Queensland Infrastructure Plan and Program (SEQIPP) outlined two decades of development of road, rail, water, energy, health, education and community infrastructure.

Of this, $35 billion has been allocated for a roads and transport package for roads, rail, buses, walking and cycling. Nearly 100 transport projects are listed.

SEQIPP will create a more efficient, accessible and comprehensive transport system in South East Queensland.

List of now approved rail projects.

* Western corridor $1.7 billion
* Greater Brisbane $0.4 billion
* Gold Coast $1.6 billion
* Sunshine Coast $2.0 billion.
 

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The SEQIP RAIL Alliance will deliver four major projects over the next six years including:

* Caboolture to Beerburrum Duplication ($240 million)
* Robina to Reedy Creek Extension ($75 million)
* Corinda to Darra Third Track ($110 million)
* Beerburrum to Landsborough Duplication ($240 million)
QR are implementing the following projects themselves.

* Salisbury to Kuraby Third Track
* Ormeau to Coomera Duplication
* Helensvale to Robina Duplication
* Mitchelton to Keperra Duplication

In addition, the Darra to Springfield project is currently on the QR SEQIP page at "Registration of Interest" phase, with proponent to be selected before the state budget is brought down.
Furthermore there are the 16 new IMUs for the Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast Lines, and 8 new SMUs for Suburban services. The first of the new units are due to be delivered around 2007. Extra EMU/SMUs from the existing fleet will also be available once the IMUs replace suburban units on interurban services

It's good to see the goverment getting on with the job, instead of the bleating that went on in the past.
 
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