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Hub-and-Spoke System - Which interchanges will likely to be the hub?

For the last 1.5 years, LTA has been talking about the upcoming hub-and-spoke system that will re-design the entire Singapore's public transport network. Basically a hub-and-spoke system reduces the need for many direct services which in turn compromises the overall efficiency of the public transport system.

In your opinion, which interchanges will most likely become a hub? Can it be just one hub per region or per town centre? My guess of the transport hubs are:
1. AMK
2. Jurong East
3. Tampines
4. Woodlands
5. Marina Bay

Any other comments?
 

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I disagree that a hub and spoke network will compromise the overall efficiency of the public transport system. In order to allow it to be beneficial rather than detrimental, the hub and spoke system needs to be incredibly well-established, which is certainly not the case right now.

Firstly, the establishment of a central planning division will be needed. Right now, our transport system is a mess because transport operators are complementing as well as competing with each other; in some cases, bus-to-train, bus-to-bus transfer is compromised and difficult because the operators of the different and even same nodes of transportation are competing, while in some cases, in other parts of the island, bus-to train transfer, bus-to-bus transfer is easy even though the operators of the various nodes of transport systems. In the former, the hub and spoke system becomes weaker than what it should be.

I've more thoughts on this but I don't wanna come out with a page-long post...

But basically, with the backbone of the transport system the rail system, buses will be increasingly see less "action" on the trunk services side, and be relegated to being feeder, intra-town, intra-region and the odd premium services.
 

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Hi all

Not sure if this is the appropriate place to post but given that it's a transport forum, there could be a higher chance of catching people here.

Was wondering if anyone here has signed up for the Master of Science in Transport and Logistics, organised by the German Institute of Science and Technology - Technical University of Munich Asia (GIST-TUM Asia), which is based in Singapore? You can google the course

Anyone enrolled in the course? Or anyone looking to head down the professional path of becoming a transport planner/engineer?
 

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MRT Questions

Hi i have a few questions about the MRT and LRT and maybe some Singaporean Forumers can help me.

1. What is the distance between platform doors. Is the distance the same for all lines?

2. What is the loading gauge of the MRT?

3. What are the dimension of the tunnels. If a TBM is used which diameter is needed. A drawing of a tunnel section would be great.

3b For tunnel section in which distance are the emergency exits placed?

4. What kind of signaling is used on the EW and NS line.

5. What kind of Automatic train Control is used on the NEL and CCL

5b What is the minimal possible headway on the NEL or CCL

6. The Bukit Panjang LRT is isolated from the Sengkang LRT and Punggol LRT also it uses another type of vehicle. Is the track and signaling for the different LRT built to the same specification? Would it be possible at least in theory to transfer a vehicle from the Sengkang LRT and use it on the Bukit Panjang LRT?

7. There are many new MRT lines under construction or planned. How about the LRTs.

Thanks for any answer.
 

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that sure is a lot of information you are looking for. most details can be found if you bother to do a search. for the rest you can go to National Library and hunt for some MRTC founding documents. will see what I can help..

1) the distance varies a little. the length of each train car is similar across all lines but doors are slightly wider for NSEW.

3) diameter should be 5.8m. there are some drawings of tunnels earlier in the CCL thread during the Promenade extra tunnel discussion. not sure if they are suitable for you.

http://www.daetwyler-rubber.com/fileadmin/user_upload/tiefbau/downtown_line_c902_singapore.pdf

4) NSEW uses ATP signalling in conjunction with ATC, the signalling upgrading is likely to bring it to CS-ATC.

5) NEL/CCL uses CBTC signalling in conjunction with ATC.

6) Track and signalling of BPLRT and SKLRT/PGLRT are from two competing companies. the way they draw power is already different, much less interoperate.

6b) 90 seconds according to Alstom documents.

http://www.tsd.org/cbtc/projects/SIG_Singapore_AutomaticMetro_en.pdf

7) Plans for LRTs have been held up indefinitely till an area where they can be maximized is found. the only other semi-official LRT in plans was the Jurong Region LRT.
 

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1. Platform doors are 1.8 meters wide. NSEWL trains have door widths of 1.4 meters, and maximum allowed overrun or underrun (to maintain the effectiveness of the PSDs in underground stations) is 0.5 meters.

2. Loading gauge if defined as track gauge (width between wheels) is 1435 mm for all of our mainlines.

4. The defining name for the signalling system is Westinghouse ATP.
 

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2. Loading gauge if defined as track gauge (width between wheels) is 1435 mm for all of our mainlines.
The loading gauge describes the dimension of the rolling stock and the infrastructure it is not directly related to the track gauge. For example the British railways use standard gauge but the loading gauge is smaller than in Japan or South Africa which use Cape gauge. Additionally the loading gauge describes the position of platform and the electric power pickup system.
Basically the loading gauge of a subway should maximize the use capacity of the trains and keep construction cost low.
Singapore MRT uses wider trains than most other Metros. Thus for the same capacity a shorter train is needed. And in Singapore there are no stations in curves thus there are no huge gaps between platform and trains.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loading_gauge
 

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Transportation Research Project for Masters

Hi everyone...

It's probably not a usual topic but I wanted to seek your ideas/advice (as mine has run semi-dry) on possible research project topics for a master thesis on land transportation.

It can be on engineering, planning, modelling, etc in nature but it should hopefully be something interesting and can be completed in 6 months. Both applied and theoretical research projects are welcomed. Feel free to propose....:)
 

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How about an analysis of fixed fares versus distance-based fares? You could look at all the instances in which a system has changed from one to the other and see whether or not there is a correlation with changes in ridership.
 

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1. Location of transport hub - based on travel patterns of majority, versus geographical centres of new towns. Inquiry into how the 2 models compare in terms of efficiency and travelling time.
2. Inquiry into how much the efficiency of the rail transport system can be increased if limited stop services (express services) are added to our MRT system, using any one of the lines.
3. Discuss about the benefits and/or shortcomings of using the existing railway line as a commuter RTS line (to connect Woodlands to Tanjong Pagar), and provide computer-based modelling to support the claims.

I can meditate over a few more over the next few days for you to choose :p
 

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1. Location of transport hub - based on travel patterns of majority, versus geographical centres of new towns. Inquiry into how the 2 models compare in terms of efficiency and travelling time.
2. Inquiry into how much the efficiency of the rail transport system can be increased if limited stop services (express services) are added to our MRT system, using any one of the lines.
3. Discuss about the benefits and/or shortcomings of using the existing railway line as a commuter RTS line (to connect Woodlands to Tanjong Pagar), and provide computer-based modelling to support the claims.

I can meditate over a few more over the next few days for you to choose :p
Please do. I'm trying to compile a good list of ideas that I can take to my supervisor to discuss. :nuts:

Oh yes, are you able to explain more on no. 1? I don't quite understand what the proposal is. :)
 

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For example in yishun, would it have been better if the bus interchange and town centre be located south, probably at where Khatib is, because most trips tend to be southwards, likewise tampines central may be located more towards the southwest. My thinking is that it will probably reduce travel time and improve efficiency of the system, but it requires modeling and analysis.
 

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Which Undergraduate course is most suitable for being a future LTA staff

Hi everyone, based on this site:

http://www.lta.gov.sg/home/home_career_scholarship.html#one

It states that to be eligible for their scholarship awards, one have to study either one of the following:


  • Civil Engineering
    Electrical & Electronic Engineering
    Mechanical Engineering
    Systems Engineering
    Service Science, Management and Engineering (SSME)
    Economics / Geography
    Mass Communication
    Science (Computer Engineering / IT Security & Communications)

Could any kind souls there help us as transport fans to know which of these areas of study means in LTA (Since LTA has different departments, such as implementation of ezlink cards to new expressway / railway project or future road planner) which I believe would affect what one do in LTA after the course has completed and happily serve their bond.

It would be wonderful if one could post links to relevant local universities for references which will also help other transport fans considering that here has many U-18.


Thanks a million.
 

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^^ That's weird.

I'd understand all the Engineering courses mentioned above, but I'm surprised Math isn't in it. I've a few friends at LTA and really, they tell me life in LTA isn't that glamorous... It's all about logarithms and statistics, numbers really.
 

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^^ That's weird.

I'd understand all the Engineering courses mentioned above, but I'm surprised Math isn't in it. I've a few friends at LTA and really, they tell me life in LTA isn't that glamorous... It's all about logarithms and statistics, numbers really.
Hmm. Different opinion by each. I agree that logarithms and statistics can be boring (And tiring) for long peroid of time. But probably I am inspired to post this is due to "Unoffical Map thread" where no, not in drawing map sense but to plot a real future line with exact stops and track schematics with justifications given.
 

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Hi everyone, based on this site:

http://www.lta.gov.sg/home/home_career_scholarship.html#one

It states that to be eligible for their scholarship awards, one have to study either one of the following:


  • Civil Engineering
    Electrical & Electronic Engineering
    Mechanical Engineering
    Systems Engineering
    Service Science, Management and Engineering (SSME)
    Economics / Geography
    Mass Communication
    Science (Computer Engineering / IT Security & Communications)

Could any kind souls there help us as transport fans to know which of these areas of study means in LTA (Since LTA has different departments, such as implementation of ezlink cards to new expressway / railway project or future road planner) which I believe would affect what one do in LTA after the course has completed and happily serve their bond.

It would be wonderful if one could post links to relevant local universities for references which will also help other transport fans considering that here has many U-18.


Thanks a million.
Actually, if you're eligible for a scholarship, LTA may themselves advise you on a degree to pursue. But personally I wouldn't advise you to select a degree based on the needs of the organisation at this age, since you are unlikely to predict the outcome of what will happen 6-10 years down the road. This is what happened to many of my friends in the organisation I worked with. Instead, select a degree based on its usefulness to achieving your goals down the road and/or passion.

At the same, I would add that it's unlikely that you will not use what you learn at university in your real job. More often than not, you will have to do OJT or further development.

But back to LTA and the statutory boards in general, if you're a scholar, more often than not you'll be rotated to all the divisions. But more so, you're likely to be headed for management, of which you'll spend more of your time managing people than doing the technical work of engineering/design/planning which will be done by your technical officers. Also, it's quite unlikely that you'll remain in one division for the rest of your working life.

As a general rule of thumb, I would propose that you stick with Civil Engineering, which provides you with a technical foundation in structures, geotechnical and infrastructure. CE is also the starting point for transport planning/engineering - you'll be able to do traffic modelling, transport planning, traffic operations and ITS as electives in your course. Mechanical engineering focusses more on the workings of systems - e.g. cars, airplanes, engines, etc. Computer engineering probably deals more with their IT systems, maybe the workings of their ITS and traffic monitoring and control (like EMAS).

Doing the engineering degrees also have benefits. In the event that you want to be a PE and/or leave the organisation / do a career switch, it would be easier for you with an undergraduate engineering degree, than to go back to school at a later age and try for a professional master degree.

If you do get a scholarship, I'd suggest going overseas and taking up their Germany offer, as the Germans are ruthlessly efficient in their transport systems and you'll learn much from them.

That said, do note that LTA does a lot of preliminary design/engineering/planning work and if you're keen on detailed design like drawing up the actual construction plans for MRT stations, tunnels, etc, it's best that you stick with private consultancy.
 

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^^ That's weird.

I'd understand all the Engineering courses mentioned above, but I'm surprised Math isn't in it. I've a few friends at LTA and really, they tell me life in LTA isn't that glamorous... It's all about logarithms and statistics, numbers really.
:)

Since when is life in any government ministry/stat board glamorous (maybe MFA or MTI, but you work your life out there)?
 

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Actually, if you're eligible for a scholarship, LTA may themselves advise you on a degree to pursue. But personally I wouldn't advise you to select a degree based on the needs of the organisation at this age, since you are unlikely to predict the outcome of what will happen 6-10 years down the road. This is what happened to many of my friends in the organisation I worked with. Instead, select a degree based on its usefulness to achieving your goals down the road and/or passion.

At the same, I would add that it's unlikely that you will not use what you learn at university in your real job. More often than not, you will have to do OJT or further development.

But back to LTA and the statutory boards in general, if you're a scholar, more often than not you'll be rotated to all the divisions. But more so, you're likely to be headed for management, of which you'll spend more of your time managing people than doing the technical work of engineering/design/planning which will be done by your technical officers. Also, it's quite unlikely that you'll remain in one division for the rest of your working life.

As a general rule of thumb, I would propose that you stick with Civil Engineering, which provides you with a technical foundation in structures, geotechnical and infrastructure. CE is also the starting point for transport planning/engineering - you'll be able to do traffic modelling, transport planning, traffic operations and ITS as electives in your course. Mechanical engineering focusses more on the workings of systems - e.g. cars, airplanes, engines, etc. Computer engineering probably deals more with their IT systems, maybe the workings of their ITS and traffic monitoring and control (like EMAS).

Doing the engineering degrees also have benefits. In the event that you want to be a PE and/or leave the organisation / do a career switch, it would be easier for you with an undergraduate engineering degree, than to go back to school at a later age and try for a professional master degree.

If you do get a scholarship, I'd suggest going overseas and taking up their Germany offer, as the Germans are ruthlessly efficient in their transport systems and you'll learn much from them.

That said, do note that LTA does a lot of preliminary design/engineering/planning work and if you're keen on detailed design like drawing up the actual construction plans for MRT stations, tunnels, etc, it's best that you stick with private consultancy.
Oh I see, thanks a lot. I will try asking LTA staffs for scholarship application and if ever possible, going to Germany for CE course despite I never learn German and English is just barely pass in my Os.
 
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