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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


Website: http://www.tri-pride.ca/

tri-Pride Outdoor Festival!!
Sunday, June 1
Roos Island, Victoria Park, 12:30-7:00pm
This is family-friendly event, with a BBQ, Licensed Area, Kid's Area, Vendor's Market, Silent Auction and featuring the stylistic indie talents of KELLY AND THE KELLY GIRLS, CHARLENA RUSSELL, KATE & MOXY, S&M, the OTE'A TANE HAWAIIAN DANCERS, MISS DREW & CREW and more!

 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Teachers, public board sponsor table at Tri-Pride festival
May 31, 2008
Karen Kawawada, RECORD STAFF
WATERLOO REGION
http://news.therecord.com/News/Local/article/358953

At first glance it won't look like anything remarkable: a bunch of teens and adults staffing an information table at a family-friendly festival in the park. They'll talk to passersby as music plays, barbecue smells drift through the air and children run around.

But the high school gay-straight alliances' table at the Tri-Pride outdoor festival in Victoria Park tomorrow will represent a "huge step," said Brooke Young, who advises all the gay-straight alliances at area schools.

To gay youth, having a table sponsored by the Ontario Secondary School Teachers' Federation and the Waterloo Region District School Board is "a clear message there are people in the board who will support you," she said.

The support comes as a new study is showing how badly it's needed. The advocacy group Egale Canada recently released preliminary results from a survey on homophobia and transphobia in schools -- the first national survey of its kind.

More than two-thirds of participating teens who identified as gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgendered, queer or questioning said they felt unsafe in schools, compared with one in five respondents who said they were straight.

More than a quarter of gay teens said they had been physically harassed because of their orientation and 41 per cent had been sexually harassed.

Over half had been verbally harassed. Meanwhile, 40 per cent of straight youth said they made homophobic remarks sometimes or frequently.

The results didn't surprise Young, who co-ordinates OK2BME, a K-W Counselling Services project that supports gay youth.

"Given I work with these youth every day, I hear that every day," she said.

"It's not surprising but it's still disappointing to hear how many people are still feeling bullied, unsafe, unwelcome," agreed Amy Brohman, 19, a member of the Forest Heights Collegiate Gay-Straight Alliance.

Brohman will be at the information table tomorrow to talk to people about what groups like hers are doing in high schools and how to start a group.

Nine of the 16 public high schools in Waterloo Region have one now, up from two last fall, and there are plans to start two more next fall, Young said.

Another first this year was a professional development session about supporting gay teens, which about 40 teachers attended in December, said teacher Wendy Bonza, who co-leads the alliance at Forest Heights.

The Egale finding that most caught her eye was that only 33 per cent of gay respondents thought teachers addressed homophobia effectively, compared with 60 per cent of straight respondents. It's clear more work needs to be done, Bonza said.

Some teachers have gotten the message. Julie Slimmon said that as a lesbian mother, her experience has so far been positive. Her daughter's junior kindergarten teacher has talked to the class about how families can be different.

"On Mother's Day, we got stuff that said: 'To my mothers.' "

Slimmon, a guidance counsellor at Waterloo-Oxford District Secondary, will be at the alliances' table tomorrow.

"There will be a lot of families there and perhaps it will give them more confidence in the school board that hopefully their son or daughter will be treated equitably," she said.

Helen Kennedy, the Egale executive director, said the preliminary results include 1,200 participants, nearly half of whom were from one school board in Vancouver. She hopes more boards will participate in the fall.

Waterloo Region's public school board has distributed information about the survey, but students have participated strictly voluntarily, said superintendent Mary Lou Mackie.

Waterloo Catholic District School Board hasn't participated and won't. Spokesperson John Shewchuk said in an e-mail the decision was made because the survey wouldn't yield board- specific data.

"That's a total cop-out" and untrue, Kennedy said. The data in the final report will be broken down by school district and made available to boards, she said. A request for a follow-up interview with the Catholic board went unanswered.

FESTIVAL
Tri-Pride Outdoor Festival
Victoria Park, Kitchener
Sunday, June 1, 12:30 to 7 p.m.
Free admission
More info: www.tri-pride.ca
 

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Thanks! He looks almost as gay as the one in the leather vest!

How topical for this discussion, btw!! I'm so glad you posted!
 

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No, Sudbury is the only city in Northern Ontario that celebrates "the homasexshuls".

Duluth also has a gay pride celebration. A couple months ago they had one just for bears!


northcountrybears

(I am not making that up. It's called a "Fur Flee", and aside from Karaoke, they also have pool parties.)
 

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No, it's the "O_OO".

The singer is really into it, btw. It's hilarious. I love finding things that are unintentionally hilarious.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
'A hate-free zone'; Tri-Pride Festival focuses on education, awareness and family friendliness
June 02, 2008
Brent Davis, RECORD STAFF
KITCHENER


Sarah Casselman performs yesterday at the Tri-Pride Festival at Victoria Park. More than 3,000 people attended.

Shelley Secrett couldn't help but smile yesterday as she gazed at the crowds taking in the Tri-Pride Festival at Victoria Park.

After all, the 13th instalment of the festival had to be cancelled last year when some of the members of the Tri-Pride Community Association's board of directors left and organizers couldn't find enough volunteers.

"This was a year of rebuilding," said Secrett, who co-chaired the event with Michael Lisetto-Smith. "And to look at it today, this is so inspiring."

Organizers estimate 3,000 to 4,000 people took part in Tri-Pride Week activities that culminated with yesterday's family-friendly festival.

"I think it's really good for young gay people to see it happening and have a positive experience," said visitor James McOy, 25, of Stratford. "And I love that they did the family thing this year. It puts a really positive spin on it."

The event featured live entertainment, children's activities, a vendor village and a silent auction with $4,000 worth of donated goods and services.

But along with the fun, there was a focus on education and awareness, an effort to build even greater acceptance within the wider community. "It's a hate-free zone," said Bradley Hamacher, also known as local drag performer Miss Drew.

"We're people too. We put on great events, and we don't have to hide it."

Lisetto-Smith said it's clear the festival no longer attracts a strictly gay and lesbian crowd.

"We used the word tolerance for a long time. We don't want to just be tolerated," Lisetto-Smit said. "I think we are moving towards acceptance."

In the past 15 years, great strides have been made in preventing discrimination based on sexual orientation. Same-sex marriage and adoption rights are spreading to more jurisdictions.

"I think that even though our community has come such a long way, I still think work needs to be done," Secrett said.

Organizers of the annual fundraising AIDS walk, which took place in Kitchener last night after the festival, say lingering negative perceptions mean the walk raises less money each year. "We still fight the stigma and the discrimination of HIV/AIDS," said Lynn Cashubec of the AIDS Committee of Cambridge, Kitchener, Waterloo and Area.

They were hoping to raise $8,000 yesterday to help fund support services provided to those living with and affected by HIV/AIDS, including counselling, support groups, and transportation to medical appointments. "It's important to recognize the gay community doesn't come out just once a year," Lisetto-Smith said. "We're always around."
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
You Are The Wind Beneath My Wings




(sorry for the poorly filmed video)
 

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You took pictures -- at a gay pride festival, no less -- and not a shirtless guy to be seen???

And knowing you, you could go to a garbage dump and find them. What gives?
 

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I hate seeing myself in pictures... and amazingly, even though I was all over the island during Pride... I don't see myself in any pictures. :cheers: hehe
 

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No, Sudbury is the only city in Northern Ontario that celebrates "the homasexshuls".
Duluth also has a gay pride celebration. A couple months ago they had one just for bears!
If I were you I'd keep this under your hat...you never know, you could have Furry Canuck traipsing through T-Bay on the way to Duluth. Better make sure all the restos in T.Bay have enough appos ready for HRH.
 
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