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Cory
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This is in response to the discussion over at the "Indianapolis Monthly" thread as well as the "Milwaukee-Chicago Super Region" thread.


Is it time for these 3 cities, Cincy 2.1M, Indy 1.9 M, L'Ville 1.3 M, to start taking a "super regional" approach in terms of marketing and comeptition? The 3 cities form a triangle and they are all 100 miles from each other. Each offers something the other can't, yet all have very similar demographics, morals and values and also overlap, in some sense, in terms of ammenities.

How could this work? Can this work? What would be accomplished? Is the competition too fierce between the 3 to even try? Should Dayton and Lexington be added? If so, does Columbus get invited too?

This is an excerpt from a 1999 Gallis Report done by the Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce. Obviously more info on that metro is provided, but it does do some cross-comparisons.

RESOURCE COMPARISONS
The Greater Cincinnati metro region does not exist in isolation. It is
a part of a much larger urban network called the "super region," a
layer of major metro centers immediately surrounding the Greater
Cincinnati metro region. These super region metros (Columbus,
Dayton, Indianapolis, Louisville, Lexington and Huntington) fall within
150 miles of downtown Cincinnati.
Within the last decade, metro regions throughout the super region
have begun a variety of initiatives that have improved their competitive
position. Greater Cincinnati, the oldest metro region in the super
region, was traditionally the dominant metropolitan area. Significant
initiatives have been undertaken by other metro regions in the super
region in areas including transportation, economic development,
governance and public management, sports, arts, culture and
education. Because of these initiatives, the Greater Cincinnati metro
region is currently in a significantly increased competitive position
for people, resources and economic activity.
ENVIRONMENT
The Ohio River and its tributaries are the key environmental resources
of the super region, weaving through the Greater Cincinnati metro
region and defining the topography and individual communities.
Cincinnati, Louisville and Huntington are the only true "river cities"
in the super region.
Of the three "river cities," the Greater Cincinnati metro region has
the greatest environmental diversity and lies at the point of
convergence of three important physiographic regions. Its varied
ecology and diverse environmental setting give the Greater Cincinnati
metro region landscape, topography and views that are unmatched
in the super region, providing the foundation for an enhanced quality
of life.
TRANSPORTATION
While the Greater Cincinnati metro region is the principal
transportation hub, there is a significant reorganization of the
transportation network pattern and functions taking place in the
super region.
The Greater Cincinnati metro region is the principal air center and
the only FAA major air hub in the super region. Dayton, Louisville
and Indianapolis are major air freight centers.
A restructuring of the super region's surface system and network has
been caused by the buyout of the Conrail system and the emergence
of the NAFTA corridor. The leading choice for the I-69 NAFTA corridor
connecting eastern Canadian ports and Mexico City passes through
Indianapolis, bypassing the Greater Cincinnati metro region.
High-speed rail is under consideration from Chicago through
Indianapolis, terminating in Cincinnati. A second high speed line,
running from Cincinnati through Columbus to Cleveland, also is
under consideration. The two lines together would transform
Cincinnati into a rail hub instead of a terminus on the Chicago line.
These rail lines would provide long distance access to the
Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport helping to solidify
its long-term future. A line from Indianapolis to Louisville is also under consideration.
CULTURE, ARTS & SPORTS
The Greater Cincinnati metro region was traditionally the primary
arts, convention and cultural center in the super region. Today,
significant culture and arts investment and development are occurring
in Columbus, Louisville and Indianapolis.
The Greater Cincinnati metro region was historically the principal
major league sports center in the super region with the oldest major
league baseball franchise, the Reds, and the NFL Bengals. The Kentucky
Derby and the Indianapolis 500, two of America's most famous
sporting events, are held in the super region. Indianapolis also has
two major league sports franchises and has hosted the Pan American Games.
Cincinnati is now engaged in a bid for the 2012 Summer Olympic
Games. This bid will include involvement from other cities in the
super region. In addition, the Greater Cincinnati metro region
traditionally was the primary convention destination in the super
region. However, major conventions are now being attracted to
recently expanded convention sites in Columbus and Indianapolis.
URBANIZATION
The Greater Cincinnati metro region is the largest metro in the super
region. In the 1990s, Lexington was the fastest growing, followed by
Indianapolis, Columbus, Cincinnati and Louisville. Huntington and
Dayton had almost no growth in that time frame.
At its current growth rates, the Greater Cincinnati metro region will
remain the largest population center in the super region for the next
50 years. However, Indianapolis and Columbus are growing faster
than the Greater Cincinnati metro region and will progressively close
the population gap and strengthen their regional competitiveness
for resources.
The demand for workers is exceeding the "natural population"
growth. The competition for people is becoming as important as the
competition for jobs.
GOVERNANCE
& PUBLIC MANAGEMENT
A wide range of government structures, including cities, towns,
townships, villages, counties, state districts, states, state capitals and
federal districts, is found throughout the super region. Indianapolis
and Columbus also benefit in many ways by being state capitals. While
Cincinnati has one of the most fragmented patterns of local
government, Indianapolis has simplified its local government into a
"uni-gov" format, allowing it to act more strategically and responsively
to the needs of the metropolitan region.
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
The super region is a part of the industrial core of America and is a
center of automotive, machine tool, packaging and steel
manufacturing. The super region's economy has historically been
manufacturing-based. Greater Cincinnati has traditionally been the
economic center of the super region as measured by number of
headquarters, total employment and value added manufacturing.
Throughout its long history, important dimensions have been added
to the super region's economy in every significant stage, except the
age of high-tech. To redress this problem, high tech councils to
strengthen, plan and strategize ways to create a high-tech dimension
to the economy have been formed across the super region. Greater
Cincinnati needs to form a strong council of this kind.
Bio-medical research is taking place at the University of Cincinnati
that could result in an emerging bio-tech economic layer in the
Greater Cincinnati metro region if properly supported.
INSTITUTIONS
There are foundations, hospitals, research facilities and medical
schools found throughout the super region. The Greater Cincinnati
metro region is a medical center with significant bio-med, cancer,
cardiology and other research undertakings. Dayton and Columbus
have significant military and non-military research facilities.
The largest foundation in the United States, the Lilly Foundation, is
located in Indianapolis. This foundation provides Indianapolis with
significant capital resources to foster and facilitate various urban and
institutional economic initiatives.
HIGHER EDUCATION
There are many universities and colleges relatively evenly distributed
throughout the super region. Cincinnati, Columbus, Dayton,
Indianapolis, Lexington, Louisville and Huntington each have major
universities but the super region has no clear leader in higher
education. The Greater Cincinnati metro region has the largest
enrollment divided between several institutions of varying sizes and
missions. In contrast, Columbus has one single dominant institution,
Ohio State, representing 90 percent of its total enrollment.
The creation of new economic layers is closely linked to a region's
educational infrastructure. Leadership in higher education becomes
increasingly necessary in the 21st century as high-tech and information
based economies are linked to a region's educational resources and
lifelong learning becomes an essential element in maintaining
competitiveness.
 

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JUNCTA JUVANT
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You cannot talk about these cities and leave out Dayton.

With Dayton and Cnicinnati combined, you're looking at over 3 million people right there.

So, over 6 million people in this 'super-region'. Sounds good to me!
 

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What's the distance between these cities? Soon enough there will be roughly 10 million people within a 100 mile radius in the Chicago-Milwaukee area.
 

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The way I drive I can be in Lousiville in an hour and 15. I drive it all the time to Nashville. Cinci takes a little long for me to get to cause im clear on the far west side, but 2 hours roughly from my house to cincy.
 

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Since we are continuing from another thread, I will include my first post from there:

I don't know why Indy and Cincy would be bickering. They are both great cities. In fact, you need to start thinking together. It is roughly 100 miles between Cincinnati and Indy, 100 miles between Indy and Louisville, 100 miles between Cincinnati and Louisville. With Dayton, Columbus, Lexington and Evansville not far away. If you were to consider that one region, that region has multiple:

Great Universities: IU, Louisville, The Ohio State U., Cincinnati, Dayton, Xavier, UK, Butler, Miami U., Wright State, etc.

Great Business and Manufacturing Base (the fortune 500 in that region): Lilly, Conseco, WellPoint, Cummings, Lexmark, Yum Restaurants, Humana, Kindred Healthcare, NCR, AK Steel, Cincinnati Financial, Fifth Third, Kroger, Federated Department Stores, Procter and Gamble, Chiquita, Western & Southern, Ashland, Omnicare, Cardinal Health, The Limited Brands, Nationwide, American Electric, Hexion Chemicals, Big Lots. - Plus all the major manufacturing facilities like Toyota, GM (3), Honda (2), Allison, Ford (3), GE, Defense Logistics, Lucent, Delphi, etc.

Great Tourist and Entertainment Options: Indy Motor Speedway, Air Force Museum, Louisville Slugger, Churchhill Downs, Keeneland & Lexington Horse Park, Holiday World, Kings Mountain, Nashville, Indiana, 6 Major League Sports Teams including one of all the 5 major sports, etc.

Government Investments: 3 State Capitols and Administrative Centers, 5 International Airports, Tons of State Parks -- Substantial Military Presence: Ft. Knox, Wright-Patterson, Atterbury, Crane Naval Weapons Facility, Indiana Reserve, etc.

And, most importantly, it has a population of over 10 million people. Really, if this area were to function as a region, it would be very comparable to New England in many respects. Other areas are starting to function as regions. Just look at the Chicago and Milwaukee threads on this board. I don't know if on this side of the Appalachians there are 3-4 major metros like this within such close proximity. Yet I never hear of the cities working together. It was certainly an element in landing the new Honda plant in Greensburg and it could be a big tourist and business draw if the cities worked together. I know different states and taxing bodies are involved, but it seems like all could benefit with increased cooperation.
Now, onward... in response to a couple of other posts on the first thread...

The fact we are dealing with Indiana and Kentucky, and to a lesser extent Ohio, as not being seen as progressive is exactly the problem that such a regional approach would diminish.

Obviously I too thought of the Triangle in NC when thinking about this area because they form such a nice geometric shape. Even the interstates cooperate in forming the triangle. But, this type of region would be much larger than the triangle/triad region in NC. Here is a list of other mini-regions of the US that I think it would compare with:

New England: Similar in size and population, although this region would have a much better distribution of population in multiple metros rather than just Boston.

Front Range: Denver is obviously the hub of the Front Range, but it really extends from Pueblo, through Colorado Springs, to Cheyenne. This mini-region is long and narrow and has I-25 has its major road.

Pacific Northwest: In this mini-region there are 2 major mid-sized cities (Seattle and Portland - although I guess you could almost include Vancouver). While they compete in some areas, when referred to as a region they get additional benefits. For instance MLS is now in expansion mode. Presently there is not a team in the "Pacific Northwest" so MLS is looking at expansion in either Seattle or Portland. This is how I see the cities in the MidSouth Triangle (that is what I will call it until someone comes up with something else) benefiting from such cooperation.

Southern California: Again, obviously there is a dominant city in LA, but other cities like Anaheim and San Diego (as well as the numerous smaller cities like Oceanside, Long Beach, San Bernardino, etc.) benefit from tourists and business visiting and residing in Southern Cal.

Texas (Triangle): The economically viable part of Texas is perhaps the most comparable mini-region to the MidSouth Triangle. Dallas/FW, Houston, San Antonio with Austin and Waco in between could form another mini-region, even if there is not formal cooperation presently. When someone goes to visit Texas, they usually visit multiple cities if their vacation is a week or so long. However, the Texas triangle is roughly double the size and distance of the MidSouth Triangle with almost 300 miles separating Dallas and San Antonio.

The present regional title of Midwest is far too large nowadays. The Midwest extends from this side of Pittsburgh to just short of Denver. It is almost a 1000 miles square (with substantial narrowing on the eastern side). Anyway, it is far too large to serve any of the tourist or business development purposes that these other mini-region areas do. A MidSouth Triangle (please help with the name) would narrow a person's focus and it could attract international businesses to a much narrower region. Sometimes Indy will win new developments over Louisville, sometimes Louisville over Cincy, and vice versa but at least within the minds of developers and tourists you are not competing with Chicago and Minneapolis and St. Louis and ... and...

The obvious problem with such an idea is the total lack of development in between some of the cities. There is great development between Dayton and Cincy, there is also decent development between Louisville and Indy (only about 20 miles south of Columbus, IN has no suburban development). But there is a lack of suburban development in between Louisville and Cincy, between Cincy and Indy, and between Indy and Dayton/Columbus. The new Honda assembly factory in Greensburg (with associated developments - yesterday they announced a new college there), will help fill in between Indy and Cincy. But, there would need to be a lot more development on 70 and 71. I don't think the state issues would be that big of a problem. If each state would agree to fund a MidSouth Development/Coordinating Board, that would get the ball rolling because they would develop a website and a mini-regional identity that could be marketed to the rest of the world. In other respects, it would be just as much about the residents as the government. For instance, if a good concert was happening in Cincy - Indy people could go. City events could be patronized and advertised in the other cities. Like the 500 festival in Indy, Derby weekend in Louisville, and Riverfest in Cincy. All of those happen at different times, so each city could provide the entertainment for that weekend kind of thing. Anyway, it is not impossible, it just takes a little coordination to get it started.
 

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Cory
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You cannot talk about these cities and leave out Dayton.

With Dayton and Cnicinnati combined, you're looking at over 3 million people right there.

So, over 6 million people in this 'super-region'. Sounds good to me!
I somewhat agree; however, Dayton is not as close to Louisville and therefore a bit out of the "triangle." For a Cincy-Indy-Dayton-Columbus region, certainly.
 

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Cory
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What's the distance between these cities? Soon enough there will be roughly 10 million people within a 100 mile radius in the Chicago-Milwaukee area.
Within a 100-mile radius of Cincinnati, there is easily 10million people! Indy, Columbus, Dayton, Lexington, Louisville and the countless small cities right outside of these metros brings the number to 10 million.
 

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Until each individual metro region can think on a regional scale, it will be very difficult to get all these metro regions to think on a bigger scale.
 

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Until each individual metro region can think on a regional scale, it will be very difficult to get all these metro regions to think on a bigger scale.

Then you'd need to come up with a regional brand name, like these existing ones: Quad cities, The twin cities, The triangle
 

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Then you'd need to come up with a regional brand name, like these existing ones: Quad cities, The twin cities, The triangle
I put the brand name of "MidSouth Triangle" out there. Until I hear something better (and I hope I do) that is what I am going to call this project. Obviously Triangle because it is a triangle. MidSouth because it comes from both the Midwest and the South (with Louisville, which is pretty southern at some places - such as a memorial to confederate dead is right next to the university), but also for other reasons such as culture. Other possibilities would be appreciated.

On what it should include, I would certainly say Dayton has to be included. It is almost part of Cincy now, why would you separate it? I also think we could let mid-sized cities in close proximity join in if they wanted, like Lexington and Evansville. Lexington brings a lot to the table and Evansville really does not, but it would be good for Evansville and would cement the MidSouth deal even more. Columbus is really a tough call. I think it would be up to them, but I think such an entity would extend an invitation. It would mean 2 Ohio cities, it would put Cincy back in the middle, but Columbus has a big education base, is a growing city, is another state capitol, etc. I think they should be included. It would not mess up the triangle concept.
 

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I know it was mentioned earlier, but here is the homeland security pact between the cities. Link.

Regional Cooperation in the Midwest Leaves Many Questions
Wednesday, October 11, 2006
According to USA Today, city officials in Louisville, Cincinnati and Indianapolis "have agreed to offer one another emergency resources in case of natural disasters, terrorist attacks or other catastrophic events."

Mutual aid agreements like these- where jurisdictions agree to come to each other's aid when the need arises- are a critical component of providing public safety services. While most cities have worked out such agreements with their immediate neighbors, the Louisville-Cincinnati-Indianapolis agreement is notable because it aims to establish a regional cooperative agreement. (Each of the cities is separated from each other by a distance of approximately 100 miles.)

Louisville, Cincinnati and Indianapolis should all be commended for making a public commitment to work together in the public interest. A few questions do come to mind, though:

First, what is being done to ensure that when first responders arrive at emergencies in either of these cities they are able to communicate with each other?

Second, a public commitment to support each other is great, but what efforts are being undertaken, in terms of governance, to make sure this statement becomes a reality?

Third, what SOPs, if any, are being developed to ensure that first responders know their expected roles and responsibilities when they respond to either one of these cities?


Posted by Steve Jones @ 1:23 PM
Anyway, it is a foundation for future relations. It shows the cities can at least talk with one another on basic issues and that the people currently in charge in these three cities all at least know each other and recognize the geographic advantages of cooperation on some issues. Also, I think the tourism people would go for this as a general matter (although the specifics would be difficult). Here is a quote from a 1999 NYTimes Article on Newport aquarium.

''All of us have something to gain from it,'' said Gayle Harden-Renfro, a spokeswoman for the Greater Cincinnati Convention and Visitors Bureau. ''Visitors don't look at city or state boundaries; to them it's the same area. So we are embracing the fact that these are invisible boundaries, and we are training ourselves not to say, 'This side of the river, that side of the river.' ''

''People come here from Louisville, Columbus and Indianapolis to see a ball game or to go to amusement parks,'' said Barbara Dozier, the vice president of sales and marketing for the Northern Kentucky Convention and Visitors Bureau. ''Our focus groups showed that few had ever been to an aquarium, because the closest are in Chattanooga and Chicago. So we hope to generate people who haven't been here before, and to get people who do visit the aquarium to stay over that second night.''
Anyway, stuff like the aquarium is something that the Super Region (no, I do not like naming it tri-state anything) could promote because other cities do not have it. Likewise, the Super Region could promote the NCAA Museum or Eitlejorg in Indy, the Ali museum (and museum plaza) in Louisville, and the Air Force Museum in Dayton - all things that are city specific. That way, when a family is looking to take a vacation and they look at Cincy or Indy and say, "what is there to do for 5-6 days there?", the answer could be this in Indy, this in Louisville, this in Cincy, this in Dayton, this in Lexington. Then a trip to the area makes a whole lot more sense instead of packing up and heading for Florida. Not to mention it would be nice to cooperatively promote this kind of information to the actual 10 million residents of the Super Region.
 

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I struggle with the concept of a super-region and what it would actually mean operationally. What exactly would this super-region do?

I've been an advocate of better regional cooperation between cities, such as tigher integration of the greater Central Indiana region. But I'm not sure how this works on a larger scale. Is there enough common interest to really find something to collaborate on?

Cincinnati seems to have just about the worst regional cooperation within its metro of anyplace I've seen. Louisville has done a good job within Jefferson County of putting an end to in-fighting thanks to city-county merger, but there is no real desire on the part of city residents for true regional cooperation. For Jerry Abramson, if it isn't inside the city limits, it can't be any good for Louisville.

I very much agree that these metro regions need to get their own act together before thinking larger.
 

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Sorry, I am doing a little research on it and there is more than I expected. Check this out. It seems we may already have a name. Link.

Innovation Award for Economic Development
Louisville, Kentucky (Tri-City Partnership)


Sister Cities of Louisville worked with Sister Cities of Indianapolis and Sister Cities of Cincinnati as part of a tri-city partnership to promote U.S.-German economic development in Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky. The three cities worked with their respective visitors bureaus and their German sister cities to promote tourism in the tri-state region. The Louisville-Mainz Committee, the Cincinnati-Munich Committee and Indianapolis-Cologne Committee jointly participated in the Cologne Tourism Convention in November 2003 with over 30,000 attendees. Using the slogan "Heart of America," the three cities developed marketing materials to promote the tri-state region to a German audience. A website, brochure and other materials highlight the area's German heritage, as well as a racing theme featuring the Indianapolis 500, the Kentucky Derby and Cincinnati's river boat races. The three cities developed a five-year plan and are making arrangements for the Cologne Tourism Convention in 2004, the ITB Berlin Travel Conference in 2005 and future joint trade missions to their German sister cities.
Also, here is an old thread on this board on the topic: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=414859

Apparently, some smaller cities are already including the triangle concept in their literature. http://www.madisonindiana.org/

Also, there is certainly plenty of Cincinnati stuff on the "Super Region." It clearly is an idea that exists in their minds. Heck, here is even a Cincinnati study about attracting the Olympic Games and the benefit it would have on the Super Region. Link Obviously, the Olympic Games are a little out of reach, but other events would be possible if the cities collaborated. For instance, I think it would have helped Indy's Super Bowl chances if as part of their presentation they could show Cincinnati and Louisville supported the idea and the hotel room and event information for those locations.
 

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I put the brand name of "MidSouth Triangle" out there. Until I hear something better (and I hope I do) that is what I am going to call this project. Obviously Triangle because it is a triangle. MidSouth because it comes from both the Midwest and the South (with Louisville, which is pretty southern at some places - such as a memorial to confederate dead is right next to the university), but also for other reasons such as culture. Other possibilities would be appreciated.

On what it should include, I would certainly say Dayton has to be included. It is almost part of Cincy now, why would you separate it? I also think we could let mid-sized cities in close proximity join in if they wanted, like Lexington and Evansville. Lexington brings a lot to the table and Evansville really does not, but it would be good for Evansville and would cement the MidSouth deal even more. Columbus is really a tough call. I think it would be up to them, but I think such an entity would extend an invitation. It would mean 2 Ohio cities, it would put Cincy back in the middle, but Columbus has a big education base, is a growing city, is another state capitol, etc. I think they should be included. It would not mess up the triangle concept.
I like Cincivillopolis.
 

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JUNCTA JUVANT
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Just a little fact ...

My wife works in downtown Cincinnati and she has a coworker that lives in Indianapolis. I thought you guys might find that interesting. This is one person that I know, how many more do you think there are? You know, crazy ...

Cwilson, you never answered my question on another thread...

Of course I wouldn't see it, but do you ever see Cincy tourism commercials in Indy? Indy is hitting Cincy with tourism commercials.
 

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Why stop at just Indy, Cincy, and L'ville?

Isn't somebody already working on a different super region just north of this super region?

Why not combine the Chicago-Milwaukee super region with the Indy, Cincy, and L'ville super region to create an extra double super-duper-duper region? That would be sweet!
 
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