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Yes, Nexus should aim for the lower-hanging fruit, but this business of producing expensive additional proposals, which you know will be ruled out at a later stage - is it not just the way the game is played?
 

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This is mainly a response to Gleb's proposals but covers some of the other points as well:

At present the All:Change programme is only there to secure the future of the existing Metro, and to make sure the infrastructure is in good working order and to extend the life of the current fleet. No extensions are planned at present, but of course there are many that have been in the pipeline since the Metro was built.

The main problems you have are:

1) Nexus gets a great deal of its funding from the levy on local councils - so unless Northumberland and Durham want to contribute, then there will be no extensions outside of Tyne and Wear without a major scheme bid to the DfT. So there goes Cramlington and Seaham (for now).

2) Metro is 1500 V DC OHL - which is now unique in the UK. This certainly rules out any usage of the ECML for extensions in the near future. Even when the fleet is replaced, you will have the expense of converting the current system to be compatible with the ECML.

3) Adding more stations to the exisiting network is one of the easier ways of serving a larger market (look at Simonside and Northumberland Park). However Simonside has been shown to have abstracted passengers from Bede. Also the timetabling is changed, meaning that the journey times are longer and moves on the single sections start to conflict. Good example at South Shields on Sunday for the Great North Run - OHL tripped due to too many trains being in that section (thought the train had failed in the worst place possible).

4) For the same reasons, new stations on the ECML between Newcastle and Durham would either increase journey times, require more rolling stock and therefore more paths, which are minimal at the minute.

5) I'm not entirely sure about Gleb's token proposals. For tokens to be used you need a closed system, with each station gated. Add to that the cost of collecting tokens and manning the gates, then it is unfeasible. New York Subway did away with them in favour of the Metrocard.

6) You are never going to get £1 billion from the DfT or Government to build all that infrastructure up here. In London, yes, but not up here. I'd say it will cost a lot more than £1 billion anyway. Good to see Nexus have plans but they are not realistic. They should concentrate on 2-3 routes which are the most feasible:

a) Leamside line
b) Ashington Blyth and Tyne
c) Tyne Dock - Brockley Whins
d) City Centre - Walker
Start with the Ring lane.
The First Stage of Development.
The Ring lane: “SEABURN – PORT – SOUTH CRAMLINGTON – AIRPORT – RYTON – NEWBOTTLE – PARK LANE”.
The distances between stations: Seaburn (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node) – *1,275 km / 0,79 miles* – Cleadon (the New station) – *1,445 km / 0,90 miles* – Harton (the New station) – *0,985 km / 0,61 miles* – Chichester (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node) – *0,915 km / 0,57 miles* – Port (the New station – the Interchange node) – *0,550 km / 0,34 miles* – Meadow Well (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node) – *1,000 km / 0,62 miles* – Billy Mill (the New station) – *1,330 km / 0,83 miles* – West Monkseaton (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node) – *2,460 km / 1,53 miles* – Seaton Delaval (the New station) – *1,980 km / 1,23 miles* – South Cramlington (the New station – the Interchange node) – *2,135 km / 1,33 miles* – Wideopen (the New station) – *1,680 km / 1,04 miles* – Dinnington (the New station) – *1,710 km / 1,06 miles* – Airport (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node) – *2,700 km / 1,68 miles* – Throckle (the New station – the Interchange node) – *1,275 km / 0,79 miles* – Ryton (the New station – the Interchange node) – *3,040 km / 1,89 miles* – Rowlands Gill (the New station) – *1,470 km / 0,91 miles* – Burnopfield (the New station) – *2,570 km / 1,060 miles* – Stanley (the New station – the Interchange node) – *3,560 km / 2,21 miles* – Chester-le-Street (the New station – the Interchange node) – *3,425 km / 2,13 miles* – Newbottle (the New station – the Interchange node) – *2,870 km / 1,78 miles* – New Silkworth (the New station – the Interchange node) – *1,085 km / 0,67 miles* – Hillview (the New station) – *0,765 km / 0,48 miles* – Park Lane (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node).
Placements of inputs and outputs from streets to underground antechambers of new stations:
- Cleadon (on the Whitburn Road, between the Laburnum Grove and the Meadowfield Drive),
- Harton (on the Saint Mary’s Avenue, between the Hight Road and the Fairholme Avenue),
- Port (on the Hayhole Road, near the Royal Quays Oulet Shopping),
- Billy Mill (on the Coast Road, between the Prestwick Avenue and the Cornhill Crescent),
- Seaton Delaval (on the Elsdon Avenue, between the Whitfield Road and the Ridds Dalec),
- South Cramlington (on the Greenlaw Road, near the Winster Place),
- Wideopen (on the Stalks Road, between the Blanchland Avenue and the A1 High Way),
- Dinnington (on the Site, between the North View and the Front Street),
- Throckle (on the Newburn Road, between the Hexham Road and the Post Office),
- Ryton (on the Main Road, between the Tower Gardens and the Dene Crescent),
- Rowlands Gill (on the Hookergate Lane, between the Hightfield Road and the Woodlea Road),
- Burnopfield (on the Syke Road, near the Brich Crescent),
- Stanley (on the Humber Hill, near the Brooks Close),
- Chester-le-Street (on the South Approach, near the Hall),
- Newbottle (on the Coaley Lane, between the Beechwood Terrace and the Staddon Way),
- New Silkworth (on the Tunstall Village Road, near the Fair Ways),
- Hillview (on the B1405 High Way, near the Playing Fields).

Basic data on the line of the First Stage of Development.
The length of the Ring lane – 40,230 km / 24,99 miles.
The number of stations – 23:
- new stations – 17 (Cleadon, Harton, Port, Billy Mill, Seaton Delaval, South Cramlington, Wideopen, Dinnington, Throckle, Ryton, Rowlands Gill, Burnopfield, Stanley, Chester-le-Street, Newbottle, New Silkworth, Hillview);
- rebuild operated stations – 6 (Seaburn, Chichester, Meadow Well, West Monkseaton, Airport, Park Lane);
- expand operated stations – 0.
The number of interchange nodes – 14:
- at new stations – 8 (Port, South Cramlington, Throckle, Ryton, Stanley, Chester-le-Street, Newbottle, New Silkworth);
- at operated stations – 6 (Seaburn, Chichester, Meadow Well, West Monkseaton, Airport, Park Lane).
The average distance between stations – 1,89 km / 1,14 miles.
The maximum distance between stations – 3,560 km / 2,21 miles (Chester-le-Street – Stanley).
The minimum distance between stations – 0,550 km / 0,34 miles (Meadow Well – Port).

 

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Between Manors and Byker
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Yes, Nexus should aim for the lower-hanging fruit, but this business of producing expensive additional proposals, which you know will be ruled out at a later stage - is it not just the way the game is played?
The way I see it, the proposals are nothing more than something nice to show the media and placate (for a while) those who are wanting major improvements to transport in Tyne and Wear. Out of the most recent proposals some will be looked at and a business case created, the one or two with the best value for money and the best ability to generate growth will be put forward, and one of those might be lucky. You and I know, and Nexus knows, that for their plans to be fully implemented, would require serious funding at a time when there are spending cuts, and would need co-operation between upto 7 LAs, Network Rail, the DfT, TOCs, FOCs and everybody who lives/owns a business near to those routes. The plans might be feasible, as in they could be done quite easily in terms of infrastructure, but it is getting the money that is the hard part - and this has become even harder in the past 2-3 years.

Taking a new station, such as ones that are planned for the Leeds area at Apperley Bridge and Kirkstall Forge - they both have been in the planning stages for around 3-5 years, has taken at least 2 to try and get funding and would take around a year to build. So approx. 8 years for one station. This is even with a large % of the money coming as a S106 agreement from the main developer.

Hopefully what Nexus will do is stick with 2-3 of the projects that have the best chance of funding. However, this shows you why new railways have a big disadvatage over buses - the infrastructure is there for the buses already (which Nexus doesn't have to maintain - apart from the odd bus shelter/large bus station and raised kerbs), whereas you have to basically start from scratch with a new rail system.
 

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Start with the Ring lane.
The First Stage of Development.
The Ring lane: “SEABURN – PORT – SOUTH CRAMLINGTON – AIRPORT – RYTON – NEWBOTTLE – PARK LANE”.

snipped
- South Cramlington (on the Greenlaw Road, near the Winster Place),
- Wideopen (on the Stalks Road, between the Blanchland Avenue and the A1 High Way),
- Dinnington (on the Site, between the North View and the Front Street),

snipped

Have I missed something on this discussion?the proposed South Cramlington station is close to where i live, there is no existing line there. There is a cycle way but that runs inbetwwen the backs of houses and not wide enough for a Metro line. Anyway the residents would be against any Metro line so close to their homes.

Is this just 'pie in the sky' or have you misread the map?

Cheers
GBDT
 

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Surely this project would hit problems when it leaves the remit of Nexus and ends up in Northumberland and Durham authority areas?
 

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The way I see it, the proposals are nothing more than something nice to show the media and placate (for a while) those who are wanting major improvements to transport in Tyne and Wear. Out of the most recent proposals some will be looked at and a business case created, the one or two with the best value for money and the best ability to generate growth will be put forward, and one of those might be lucky. You and I know, and Nexus knows, that for their plans to be fully implemented, would require serious funding at a time when there are spending cuts, and would need co-operation between upto 7 LAs, Network Rail, the DfT, TOCs, FOCs and everybody who lives/owns a business near to those routes. The plans might be feasible, as in they could be done quite easily in terms of infrastructure, but it is getting the money that is the hard part - and this has become even harder in the past 2-3 years.

Taking a new station, such as ones that are planned for the Leeds area at Apperley Bridge and Kirkstall Forge - they both have been in the planning stages for around 3-5 years, has taken at least 2 to try and get funding and would take around a year to build. So approx. 8 years for one station. This is even with a large % of the money coming as a S106 agreement from the main developer.

Hopefully what Nexus will do is stick with 2-3 of the projects that have the best chance of funding. However, this shows you why new railways have a big disadvatage over buses - the infrastructure is there for the buses already (which Nexus doesn't have to maintain - apart from the odd bus shelter/large bus station and raised kerbs), whereas you have to basically start from scratch with a new rail system.
Finance the first phase can be carried out on the basis of a loan guaranteed by the Government. After the First phase will gradually increase the investment attractiveness of the Tyne & Wear Conurbation. You will be able to organize Joint-stock company ....
There will be a means to the Second Stage of Development. The Long Radial lane will connect the most remote cities with center.

The Second Stage of Development.
The Long Radial lane: “BLYTH – SOUTH CRAMLINGTON – PELAW – NEWBOTTLE – PETERLEE”.
The distances between stations: Blyth (the New station) – *3,155 km / 1,96 miles* – Cramlington (the New station) – *0,935 km / 0,98 miles* – South Cramlington (the Expand operated station – the Interchange node) – *1,865 km / 1,16 miles* – Killingworth (the New station) – *1,905 km / 1,18 miles* – Four Lane Ends (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node) – *1,690 km / 1,05 miles* – Walkergate (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node) – *1,200 km / 0,75 miles* – Walker (the New Station) – *0,980 km / 0,61 miles* – Pelaw (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node) – *0,930 km / 0,58 miles* – Leam Lane (the New station – the Interchange node) – *2,155 km / 1,34 miles* – Glebe (the New station – the Interchange node) – *1,055 km / 0,66 miles* – Fatfield (the New station – the Interchange node) – *1,325 km / 0,82 miles* – Shiney Row (the New station) – *0,800 km / 0,50 miles* – Newbottle (the Expand operated station – the Interchange node) – *0,995 km / 0,62 miles* – Houghton-le-Spring (the New station) – *1,320 km / 0,82 miles* – Hetton-le-Hole (the New station) – *1,940 km / 1,21 miles* – Murton (the New station) – *2,810 km / 1,75 miles* – Colliery (the New station) – *1,590 km / 0,99 miles* – Peterlee (the New station).

Placements of inputs and outputs from streets to underground antechambers of new stations:
- Blyth (on the Broad Way, between the Plessey Road and the Kingsway),
- Cramlington (on the B1326 High Way, near the Newlyn Drive),
- Killingworth (on the Killingworth Way, between the Woodvale Road Close and the Bannockburn),
- Walker (on the Saint Anthony’s Road, between the Wigmore Avenue and the Lancefield Avenue),
- Leam Lane (on the Colegate, between the Wealcroft and the Meresyde),
- Glebe (on the Parkway, between the Roche Court and the Newstead Court),
- Fatfield (on the Fallowfield Way, between the Broadmeadows and the Fernlea Close),
- Shiney Row (on the South View, near the Henry Street),
- Houghton-le-Spring (on the Durham Road, between the Dunholm Close and the Bishops Wyrd),
- Hetton-le-Hole (on the Houghton Road / the Station Road, between the Logan Street and the Station View),
- Murton (on the Barnes Road, between the Webb Avenue and the Toft Crescent),
- Colliery (on the Seaside Lane, between the Whickham Street and the Milton Lane),
- Peterlee (on the Burnhope Way, between the Passfield Way and the Burnhope Close).

Basic data on the line of the Second Stage of Development.
The length of the line – 26,650 km / 16,56 miles.
The number of stations – 18:
- new stations – 13 (Blyth, Cramlington, Killingworth, Walker, Leam Lane, Glebe, Fatfield, Shiney Row, Houghton-le-Spring, Hetton-le-Hole, Murton, Colliery, Peterlee);
- rebuild operated stations – 3 (Four Lane Ends, Walkergate, Pelaw);
- expand operated stations – 2 (South Cramlington, Newbottle).
The number of interchange nodes – 8:
- at new stations – 3 (Leam Lane, Glebe, Fatfield);
- at operated stations – 5 (South Cramlington, Four Lane Ends, Walkergate, Pelaw, Newbottle).
The average distance between stations – 1,568 km / 0,97 miles.
The maximum distance between stations – 3,115 km / 1,96 miles (Blyth – Cramlington).
The minimum distance between stations – 0,800 km / 0,50 miles (Newbottle – Shiney Row).

 

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Have I missed something on this discussion?the proposed South Cramlington station is close to where i live, there is no existing line there. There is a cycle way but that runs inbetwwen the backs of houses and not wide enough for a Metro line. Anyway the residents would be against any Metro line so close to their homes.

Is this just 'pie in the sky' or have you misread the map?

Cheers
GBDT
Stations of new Metro lanes are located in densely built-up areas. It is therefore proposed to use deep-level stations. Excavation tunnels and construction of stations being closed method – without opening the earth's surface. Tracing of underground lanes and location of stations is carried out independently of the existing buildings and the projected development. The stations are located in places where they will be most convenient for the residents.

The stations of two types - one-arched station and the three-arched station. One-arched stations consist of a single elliptical tunnel with island platform.

The three-arched station consists of two lateral tunnel and located between the middle tunnel. The vaults of the side tunnels from the passenger platforms have vaulted the average total tunnel supports. In the side tunnels are paths and platforms for boarding and alighting. On average, the tunnel is located distribution hall, which connects with the side aisles of passenger platforms.

Two-arched station consisting of two parallel tunnels, do not apply. They are inconvenient to use. There is no hall between the passenger distribution platforms.

This is particularly important during construction of the third stage.


The Third Stage of Development.
The Radial lane: “SAINT JAMES – THROCKLE – HEDDON-ON-THE-WALL”.
The distances between stations: Saint James (the Expend operated station) – *1,205 km / 0,75 miles* – Benwell (the New station) – *1,165 km / 0,72 miles* – Denton Burn (the New station) – *1,125 km / 0,70 miles* – Westerhope (the New station) – *1,245 km / 0,77 miles* – Throckle (the Expend operated station – the Interchange node) – *1,460 km / 0,91 miles* – Heddon-on-the-Wall (the New station).

Placements of inputs and outputs from streets to underground antechambers of new stations:
- Benwell (on the West Road, between the Hoyle Avenue and the Condercum Road),
- Denton Burn (on the West Road, near the East Denton Hall),
- Westerhope (on the Hillhead Perkway, between the Caversham Road and the Frenton Close),
- Heddon-on-the-Wall (on the Hexham Road, between the Towne Gate and the Military Road).

Basic data on the line of the Third Stage of Development.
The length of the line – 6,190 km / 3,84 miles.
The number of stations – 6:
- new stations – 4 (Benwell, Denton Burn, Westerhope, Heddon-on-the-Wall);
- rebuild operated stations – 0 (-);
- expend operated stations – 2 (Saint James, Throckle).
The number of interchange nodes – 1:
- at new stations – 0 (-);
- at operating stations – 1 (Throckle).
The average distance between stations – 1,238 km / 0,77 miles.
The maximum distance between stations – 1,460 km / 0,91 miles (Throckle – Heddon-on-the-Wall).
The minimum distance between stations – 1,165 km / 0,72 miles (Denton Burn – Benwell).
 

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Comments:
The distance between stations, particularly in the inner area, seems too great, given the density of population. More suitable, perhaps, would be stops at St James-Big Lamp-General Hospital-West Road-Denton Burn and onwards.

Also the topography of the area is not conducive to development, with a very steep climb from St James to Big Lamp, and a further ascent to General Hospital heading westwards, and an even steeper ascent from Denton Burn to West Road heading eastwards. Railways tend to avoid steep ascents of this kind.
 

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Comments:
The distance between stations, particularly in the inner area, seems too great, given the density of population. More suitable, perhaps, would be stops at St James-Big Lamp-General Hospital-West Road-Denton Burn and onwards.

Also the topography of the area is not conducive to development, with a very steep climb from St James to Big Lamp, and a further ascent to General Hospital heading westwards, and an even steeper ascent from Denton Burn to West Road heading eastwards. Railways tend to avoid steep ascents of this kind.
You are very accurately pointed out the difficulty in tracing the lane from Saint James to Heddon-on-the-Wall. That's why this relatively short section as the Separate stage.
The existing network of Tyne & Wear Metro distance between the stations is too short. This technology is not convenient for the train. This is inconvenient for passengers.
The world practice of Metro systems operation shows that convenient for passengers distance to Subway Station - 1.00 km / 0.62 miles.
This corresponds to:
• 15 minutes walking;
• 5 minutes on a scooter;
• 3 minutes on a bike;
• 2 stops by bus.

Therefore, the proposed scheme of the distance between the stations increased. The exact location of the stations will be clarified during the detailed design. In less dense areas of settlement may further increase the distance between stations. Increased distance between the stations will increase the speed of trains.

An example is the fourth stage of development.

The Fourth Stage of Development.
The Radial lane: “EAST DURHAM – CHESTER-LE-STREET – LOW FELL (branch on LEAM LANE) – GATESHEAD”.
The distances between stations: East Durham (the New station) – *1,615 km / 1,00 miles* – Durham (the New station) – *1,230 km / 0,76 miles* – Pity Me (the New station) – *3,005 km / 1,87 miles* – Chester-le-Street (the Expand operated station – the Interchange node) – *1,990 km / 1,24 miles* – Ouston (the New station) – *1,200 km / 0,75 miles* – Kibblesworth (the New station – the Interchange node) – *1,950 km / 1,21 miles* – Low Fell (the New station – the Interchange node) – *1,105 km / 0,96 miles* – Mount Pleasant (the New station – the Interchange node) – *0,600 km / 0,37 miles* – Gateshead (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node). Low Fell (the New station – the Interchange node) – *1,520 km / 0,94 miles* – Leam Lane (the Expand operated station – the Interchange node).

Placements of inputs and outputs from streets to underground antechambers of new stations:
- East Durham (on the Broomside Lane, near Community Centre),
- Durham (on the New Elvet, near New Elvet Bridge),
- Pity Me (on the Carr House Drive, between the Bek Road and the Alnwick Road),
- Ouston (on the Bradley Close, near the Leyburn Close),
- Kibblesworth (on the Kibblesworth Bank, near the Post Office),
- Low Fell (on the Engine Lane, between the Kells Lane and the A167 High Way),
- Mount Pleasant (on the Edendale Terrace, near the Art Gallery).

Basic data on lines of the Fourth Stage of Development.
The length of the line – 14,220 km / 8,83 miles.
The number of stations – 10:
- new stations – 7 (East Durham, Durham, Pity Me, Ouston, Kibblesworth, Low Fell, Mount Pleasant);
- rebuild operated stations – 1 (Gateshead);
- expand operated stations – 2 (Chester-le-Street, Leam Lane).
The number of interchange nodes – 6:
- at new stations – 3 (Kibblesworth, Low Fell, Mount Pleasant);
- at operated stations – 3 (Chester-le-Street, Gateshead, Leam Lane).
The average distance between stations – 1,580 km / 0,98 miles.
The maximum distance between stations – 3,005 km / 1,87 miles (Chester-le-Street – Pity Me).
The minimum distance between stations – 0,600 km / 0,37 miles (Mount Pleasant – Gateshead).

 

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cogito ergo sum
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Have I missed something on this discussion?
No.

Is this just 'pie in the sky' or have you misread the map?
Yes.

It appears that the poster of these maps is reporting a fantasy future Metro - one with 4 new crossings of the Tyne, runs non-stop through Heaton, goes up to Burnopfield and down again, costs more than Crossrail, stops at quiet villages but misses most major centres of employment (eg Ouston & Kibblesworth but not Team Valley or Cobalt) etc. etc.

Anyway the residents would be against any Metro line so close to their homes.
I don't think the good folk of Cramlington have anything to fear.
 

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Europe could fund Metro expansion plans
by Adrian Pearson, The Journal, September 23rd 2011


TYNE & WEAR METRO bosses will approach the European Investment Bank as part of plans to fund two decades of rail expansion.

The Journal revealed last week hopes of expanding the system on up to nine new railway routes, with train-trams brought in to meet future transport needs.

But with Government cash drying up, members of the Tyne & Wear Integrated Transport Authority have been asked to back plans to start looking for alternative funding sources. Ministers at the Department for Transport are expected to start considering new infrastructure projects from 2014, meaning work has to start now preparing the business case.

Nexus director general Bernard Garner told members of the authority at a meeting yesterday the current refurbishment work 90% funded by the Government was “an option that is no longer available to us”.

Instead a variety of approaches will be considered, including a trip to Brussels for funds, as well as a plea to local firms and organisations to find ways of becoming involved in the Metro’s long-term future.


Read More (Two Pages) - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-...expansion-plans-61634-29472541/#ixzz1Yl8FKwlR
 

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Stations of new Metro lanes are located in densely built-up areas. It is therefore proposed to use deep-level stations. Excavation tunnels and construction of stations being closed method –
Any extension to the Metro will be mainly overland as the costs of tunnelling are too great. The Government will only give us the absolute minimum funding, if they give us anything! If they won't fund any duelling to the A1 I can't see them funding any major extensions.

Cheers
GBDT
 

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Between Manors and Byker
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This

The existing network of Tyne & Wear Metro distance between the stations is too short. This technology is not convenient for the train. This is inconvenient for passengers.
and

gleconsam said:
Increased distance between the stations will increase the speed of trains.
Is untrue. I'm not sure if you entirely know the histroy of the suburban lines around the Newcastle area - but the way the system has been designed is to allow fast acceleration between stations which are quite close together. If you look at the Sunderland extension this is where the Metro falls down - it can get to top speed rather quickly compared to any diesel service on the line but once it hits 80 kph then it will go no faster (and the stations are more widely spaced apart to boot).

Most passengers prefer to be close to a railway station (therefore of course you need more stations in an area to serve the market). There are some obscure guidelines when proposing new developments that they should be within 200m walk of a bus stop and between 500m - 1km of a railway station in built up areas.

Also, although tunnelling would be the best option from an engineering point of view, it is totally cost prohibitive. That is why new tunnels on the exisiting system were kept to a minimum.
 

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Any extension to the Metro will be mainly overland as the costs of tunnelling are too great. The Government will only give us the absolute minimum funding, if they give us anything! If they won't fund any duelling to the A1 I can't see them funding any major extensions.

Cheers
GBDT
Now occupied by terrestrial lanes 4.5 square kilometers of the most valuable territory in the densely built-up areas. Further development of land lines would require a further 10 - 12 square kilometers of territory. It will be necessary to demolish the houses and public buildings in the band width of 50 meters along the route.
The cost of demolition of structures and compensation many times exceed the cost of underground lanes. And what will be the cultural, historical and moral hazard ....
From the standpoint of saving money to do all the lines underground.
And after the eighth stage of my proposed plan of development to the ninth stage of development. This is a translation of existing land lines to the underground ... But this is after the implementation of the Fifth and Sixth stage …. .

The Fifth Stage of Development.
The Radial lane: “SOUTH HYLTON – GLEBE – BIRTLEY (branch on FATFIELD) – KIBBLESWORTH – THE METRO CENTRE – RYTON – PRUDHOE”.
The distances between stations: South Hylton (the Expand operated station) – *2,775 km / 1,72 miles* – Glebe (the Expand operated station – the Interchange node) – *1,585 km / 0,98 miles* – Birtley (the New station – the Interchange node) – *1,560 km / 0,97 miles* – Kibblesworth (the Expand operated station – the Interchange node) – *2,565 km / 1,59 miles* – Whickham (the New station – the Interchange node) – *0,815 km / 0,51 miles* – The Metro Centre (the New station – the Interchange node) – *1,505 km / 0,94 miles* – Blaydon (the New station) – *1,560 km / 0,97 miles* – Ryton (the Expand operated station – the Interchange node) – *1,075 km / 0,67 miles* – Crawcrook (the New station) – *2,040 km / 1,27 miles* – Prudhoe (the New station). Birtley (the New station – the Interchange node) – *1,450 km / 0,90 miles* – Rickleton (the New station) – *1,660 km / 1,03 miles* – Fatfield (the Expand operated station – the Interchange node).
Placements of inputs and outputs from streets to underground antechambers of new stations:
- Birtley (on the Durham Road, between the Edward Road and the Mitchell Street),
- Whickham (on the Whickham Highway, between the Washingwell Lane and the Coniston Avenue),
- The Metro Centre (inside The Metro Centre),
- Blaydon (on the Pine Road, between the Sycamore Road and the Maple Road),
- Crawcrook (on the Kapier Chare, near the Main Street),
- Prudhoe (on the Station Road, betweeb Western Avenue and the Cranleigh Grove),
- Rickleton (on the Rickleton Way, between the Coquet and the Alwin).

Basic data on lines of the Fifth Stage of Development.
The length of the line – 18,850 km / 11,85 miles.
The number of stations – 12:
- new stations – 7 (Birtley, Whickham, The Metro Centre, Blaydon, Crawcrook, Prudhoe, Rickleton);
- rebuild operated stations – 0 (-);
- expand operated stations – 5 (South Hylton, Glebe, Kibblesworth, Ryton, Fatfield).
The number of interchange nodes – 7:
- at new stations – 3 (Birtley, Whickham, The Metro Centre);
- at operated stations – 4 (Glebe, Kibblesworth, Ryton, Fatfield).
The average distance between stations – 1,689 km / 1,05 miles.
The maximum distance between stations – 2,775 km / 1,72 miles (Glebe – South Hylton).
The minimum distance between stations – 0,815 km / 0,51 miles (The Metro Centre – Whickham).



The Sixth Stage of Development.
The Radial lane: “SEAHAM – NEW SILKWORTH – PALLION – TYNE DOCK”.
The distances between stations: Seaham (the New station) – *2,865 km / 1,78 miles* – New Silkworth (the Expand operated station – the Interchange node) – *1,380 km / 0,86 miles* – Springwell (the New station) – *1,225 km / 0,76 miles* – Pallion (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node) – *1,435 km / 0,89 miles* – Downhill (the New station) – *2,525 km / 1,57 miles* – Brockley Whins (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node) – *1,205 km / 0,75 miles* – Tyne Dock (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node).
Placements of inputs and outputs from streets to underground antechambers of new stations:
- Seaham (on the North Railway Street, between the Henry Street and Back North Terrace),
- Springwell (on the Springwell Road, between the Somerset Road and Sutherland Drive),
- Downhill (on the Hylton Lane, near the Council Office).

Basic data on the line of the Sixth Stage of Development.
The length of the line – 10,635 km / 6,61 miles.
The number of stations – 7:
- new stations – 3 (Seaham, Springwell, Downhill);
- rebuild operated stations – 3 (Pallion, Brockley Whins, Tyne Dock);
- expand operated stations – 1 (New Silkworth).
The number of interchange nodes – 4:
- at new stations – 0 (-);
- at operated stations – 4 (New Silkworth, Pallion, Brockley Whins, Tyne Dock).
The average distance between stations – 1,773 km / 1,10 miles.
The maximum distance between stations – 2,865 km / 1,78 miles (Seaham – New Silkworth).
The minimum distance between stations – 1,205 km / 0,75 miles (Tyne Dock – Brockley Whins).

 

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This



and



Is untrue. I'm not sure if you entirely know the histroy of the suburban lines around the Newcastle area - but the way the system has been designed is to allow fast acceleration between stations which are quite close together. If you look at the Sunderland extension this is where the Metro falls down - it can get to top speed rather quickly compared to any diesel service on the line but once it hits 80 kph then it will go no faster (and the stations are more widely spaced apart to boot).

Most passengers prefer to be close to a railway station (therefore of course you need more stations in an area to serve the market). There are some obscure guidelines when proposing new developments that they should be within 200m walk of a bus stop and between 500m - 1km of a railway station in built up areas.

Also, although tunnelling would be the best option from an engineering point of view, it is totally cost prohibitive. That is why new tunnels on the exisiting system were kept to a minimum.
Every day I ride the Tyne & Wear Metro (with daily rush-hour immense pleasure to deliver convenient for some passengers frequent stops). I study the history of the Metro by the various documents.
For specific of my professional education and experience I have some knowledge in the design and construction of railroads (including the Metro) in different countries.
Thanks to communicate on the Forum I know a lot of interesting details ...
Sorry for the short historical remark. As you know, the current system of Tyne & Wear Metro lanes formed on the basis of delivery of coal from mines to port facilities. Subsequently, in order to save money, these same freight lanes have been transformed into the passenger lane. Further development, to save money, followed the path of conversion of these lanes in the Light Metro.
Currently, potential freight transport system, in a converted passenger, completely exhausted.
Need to move on to the Modern passenger transport system, off-street transportation, which allows you to cater for the increasing flow of passengers.

Our Tyne & Wear Metro is the most interesting in the United Kingdom.
Let's continue with its interesting development.

LOOK FOR MEANS, TO MAKE INTERESTING PROJECTS ....

In the meantime, searching for money, look at and discuss the scheme of the Seventh and Eighth stages of Development (Proposals from my “Project of the Tyne & Wear Metro Development”):

The Seventh Stage of Development.
The Radial lane: “CONSETT – STANLEY – WHICKHAM – CENTRAL STATION – MANORS (branch on THE METRO CENTRE – BENSHAM – FELLING)”.
The distances between stations: Consett (the New station) – *3,180 km / 1,98 miles* – Annfield Plain (the New station) – *1,830 km / 1,14 miles* – Stenley (the Expand operated station – the Interchange node) – *4,535 km / 2,82 miles* – Whickham (the Expand operated station – the Interchange node) – *1,530 km / 0,95 miles* – Bensham (the New station) – *0,805 km / 0,50 miles* – Central Station (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node) – *0,600 km / 0,37 miles* – Manors (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node). The Metro Centre (the Expand operated station – the Interchange node) – 1,605 km / 1,00 miles – Bensham (the New station) – 0,630 km / 0,39 miles – Mount Pleasant (the Expand operated station – the Interchange node) – 0,945 km / 0,59 miles – Felling (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node).
Placements of inputs and outputs from streets to underground antechambers of new stations:
- Consett (on the Manse Street, near the Park Street),
- Annfield Plain (on the New Front Street, near the Queens Parade),
- Bensham (on the Hazel Road, between the Kyle Road and the Bensham Crescent).

Basic data on lanes of the Seventh Stage of Development.
The length of the lane – 15,115 km / 9,39 miles.
The number of stations – 10:
- new stations – 3 (Consett, Annfield Plain, Bensham);
- rebuild operated stations – 3 (Central Station, Manors, Felling);
- expand operated stations – 4 (Stenley, Whickham, The Metro Centre, Mount Pleasant).
The number of interchange nodes – 8:
- at new stations – 1 (Bensham);
- at operated stations – 7 (Stenley, Whickham, Central Station, Manors, The Metro Centre, Mount Pleasant, Felling).
The average distance between stations – 2,159 km / 1,34 miles.
The maximum distance between stations – 4,535 km / 2,82 miles (Whickham – Stanley).
The minimum distance between stations – 0,600 km / 0,37 miles (Central Station – Manors).



The Eighth Stage of Development.
Branches of radial lanes:
”AIRPORT – PONTELAND”;
”BANK FOOT – HAYMARKET”;
”HOWDON – PORT”;
”SOUTH SHIELDS – TYNEMOUTH”;
“REGENT CENTRE – LONGBENTON”.
The distances between stations: Airport (the Expand operated station – the Interchange node) – *1,600 km / 0,99 miles* – Ponteland (the New station).
Bank Foot (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node) – *1,115 km / 0,69 miles* – Kenton (the New station) – *1,875 km / 1,17 miles* – Haymarket (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node). Howdon (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node) – *0,850 km / 0,53 miles* – Port (the Expand operated station – the Interchange node).
South Shields (the Expand operated station) – *0,495 km / 0,30 miles* – Best View (the New station) – *0,490 km / 0,31 miles* – Tynemouth (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node). Regent Centre (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node) – *0,825 km / 0,51 miles* – Longbenton (the Rebuild operated station – the Interchange node). On this site (stations and track) produced minimal reconstruction. Because there is a connection of stations through the existing Depot.
Placements of inputs and outputs from streets to underground antechambers of new stations:
- Ponteland (on the Middle Drive, between The Wynde and Sycamore Avenue),
- Kenton (on the Houghton Avenue, near the Community Centre),
- Best View (on the New Tyne Bridge).

Basic data on the lanes of the Eighth Stage of Development.
The length of lanes – 8,175 km / 5,08 miles.
The number of stations – 12:
- new stations – 3 (Ponteland, Kenton, Best View);
- rebuild operated stations – 7 (Bank Foot, Haymarket, Howdon, South Shields, Tynemouth, Regent Centre, Longbenton);
- expand operated stations – 2 (Airport, Port).
The number of interchange nodes – 8:
- at new stations – 0 (-);
- at operating stations – 6 (Airport, Bank Foot, Haymarket, Howdon, Port, Tynemouth, Regent Centre, Longbenton).
The average distance between stations – 1,022 km / 0,64 miles.
The maximum distance between stations – 1,875 km / 1,17 miles (Haymarket – Kenton).
The minimum distance between stations – 0,475 km / 0,30 miles (South Shields – Best View) … !!!

 

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I might have been born in Benwell but I do object that they are trying to expand it. Benwell ends as you come up Condercum road at the junction of Condercum and Wellfield road. Above that it is Fenham. Just because the voting areas have been changed does not change the established area name. According to postal and land records the west road is fenham. no body in that area wants to see several thousand off the price of their house because some political party wanted to move boundaries to increase their majority. As for the metro I will believe it when it happens, we were promised a west road station when St James was first built, never happened so far.
 

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Metro workers to be balloted over strike action
by Stephen Cape, Evening Chronicle, September 24th 2011


METRO workers are to be balloted over strike action, which would bring the network to a standstill.

The national executive of the RMT union has unanimously voted to call a ballot “over the Government’s attack on pensions”.

Around 300 rail staff such as drivers, fitters and station workers are being recommended to vote ‘yes’, with the walk-out set for November 30.

This would link in with the national day of industrial action involving millions of workers who are protesting at job cuts and changes to public pension schemes.

In 2010 Tyne and Wear Metro workers were transferred from Nexus to the company responsible for the trains and stations, DB Regio.

Under the agreement they all remain part of the local government pension scheme which the RMT claims is “under attack” from the Government with staff working longer and getting less.


Read More - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/nort...819&siteid=72703-name_page.html#ixzz1YrzOJ2EL
 

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Metro workers to be balloted over strike action
by Stephen Cape, Evening Chronicle, September 24th 2011


METRO workers are to be balloted over strike action, which would bring the network to a standstill.

The national executive of the RMT union has unanimously voted to call a ballot “over the Government’s attack on pensions”.

Around 300 rail staff such as drivers, fitters and station workers are being recommended to vote ‘yes’, with the walk-out set for November 30.

This would link in with the national day of industrial action involving millions of workers who are protesting at job cuts and changes to public pension schemes.

In 2010 Tyne and Wear Metro workers were transferred from Nexus to the company responsible for the trains and stations, DB Regio.

Under the agreement they all remain part of the local government pension scheme which the RMT claims is “under attack” from the Government with staff working longer and getting less.


Read More - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/nort...819&siteid=72703-name_page.html#ixzz1YrzOJ2EL
Apart from the Tories sneaky change from RPI to CPI uprating, I have no sympathy whatsoever. Fully index linked final salary pensions and retirement at 60 (or even 65) are wholly unaffordable to the private sector due to changes in life expectancy and long term reductions in interest rates. Yes, government meddling and Brown's heinous raid on private pensions in 1997 have caused immense damage, but the extinction of final salary schemes was inevitable regardless of government incompetence.

I keep hearing that firms should level up pensions to that on offer to state workers, yet to do so would require private sector workers to set aside around a third of their salary. Simply not realistic. State workers on the other hand contribute just a fraction of this - nowhere near the actual worth of their pension.

This is not just an issue of affordability - it's about fairness too. State workers now typically earn more than private (and work shorter hours, more holiday etc), so to expect those who earn less to not only fund their pensions, but also retire several years later on a much smaller income is immoral IMO.
 

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Creation of the Barrier-free environment in the Developed network of the Tyne and Wear Metro

In the extensive network of the Tyne and Wear Metro to be implemented a set of measures to create of the Barrier-free environment. It includes commonly occurring events, used in many subways like the United Kingdom and around the World.
Tyne and Wear Metro is being made more accessible for people with disabilities and to comply with the provisions of the Commonwealth Government’s Disability Discrimination Act (1992) and the Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport (2002). There are specific measures that reflect the features of a developed network of Tyne and Wear Metro.
A feature of the proposed scheme of the Tyne and Wear Metro, forming a ring-radial network, is the ability to organize routes, which provide connection between any two stations without interchanges. This, of course, increases the movement, but to minimize the inconvenience suffered by passengers, when transplanted from one train to another, overcoming the corridors, ramps, elevators and escalators at the interchange nodes.
An example of such route: travel from the Station “East Durham” to the Station “Haddon-on-the-Wall”. Normal, the “Short route”: East Durham, Durham, Pity Me, Chester-le-Street (Radial), * TRANSFER *, Chester-le-Street (Ring), Stanley, Burnopfield, Rowlands Gill, Ryton, Throckle (Ring), * TRANSFER *, Throckle(Radial), Heddon-on-the-Wall. This route passes through 10 stations, and implies two transfers with the use of escalators or elevators. Its length is 24.5 km / 14.91 miles. Even if you have a maintainer for passengers with disabilities serial input and output in three trains, performed twice to transfer from one line to another, using elevators or escalators, creates obvious technical and psychological discomfort.
There is another, “Average route”: East Durham, Durham, Pity Me, Chester-le-Street, Ouston, Kibblesworth, Low Fell, Mount Pleasant, Gateshead, Central Station, Monument, *TRANSFER*, Monument, Saint James, Benwell , Denton Burn, Westerhope, Throckle, Heddon-on-the-Wall. This route passes through 17 stations. Its length is 27.0 km / 16.78 miles. The route involves one transfer. This transfer performed at the same station “Monument” in another train.
Alternatively, you can use the “Long route” – the Route – 16: East Durham, Durham, Pity Me, Chester-le-Street, Ouston, Kibblesworth, Low Fell, Mount Pleasant, Gateshead, Central Station, Monument, Haymarket, Jesmond, West Jesmond, Ilford Road, South Gosforth, Longbenton, Four Lane Ends, Benton, Palmersville, Shiremoor, West Monkseaton, Monkseaton, Whitley Bay, Cullercoats, Tynemouth, North Shields, Meadow Well, Percy Main, Howdon, Hadrian Road, Wallsend, Walkergate, Chillingham Road , Byker, Manors, Monument, Saint James, Benwell, Denton Burn, Westerhope, Throckle, Heddon-on-the-Wall. This route passes through 43 stations. Its length is 46.0 km / 28.58 miles. It takes about one and a half times as long. But on this route there is no transfer which minimizes the technical and psychological discomfort.
The organization of this type is suitable routes every half hour in rush hour and every three quarters of an hour or an hour at other times (depending on the actual traffic flow). On the audio-visual displays, advising passengers on the route definition provides information on alternative options:
- “The Short Route” (the scheme of the Route with the release of the Initial station, the Final station, interchange nodes, travel time, timetable of train on this Route for a period of time, time to nearest train arrival at the platform);
- “The Average Route” (the scheme of the Route with the release of the Initial station, the Final station, interchange nodes, travel time, timetable of train on this Route for a period of time, time to nearest train arrival at the platform);
- “The Long Route” (the scheme of the Route with the release of the Initial station, the Final station, travel time, timetable of train on this Route for a period of time, time to nearest train arrival at the platform).
On separate stands shown daily schedule of “long routes” with the release of trains arriving at the station in the next half hour. This schedule is published on the websites of the Metro operating company. It also applies in the form of free brochures.
Thus, a set of passive and active measures, supplemented by a group thro routes will form a complete barrier-free environment, providing maximum convenience and availability of advanced network Tyne & Wear Metro.
 
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