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Between Manors and Byker
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My experience with using Oyster cards and LU in general is quite the opposite. I find that the now essentially I can use plastic for everything from buying a coffee to transport I rarely actually carry cash and often have to consciously avoid places where I am unable to use it. Anything that streamlines this further is bound to get a huge uptake in my view. I would also imagine students (fundamentally lazy) getting the Metro into town will be far more inclined to pay and use the service if they didn't have to hunt round West Jesmond for change.
I take your point but in general change takes time. Many people still prefer to use coins/notes for small item purchases such as newspapers, bottles of pop/water etc, so I can still see a large amount of the low value tickets being paid for by coin (however accepting notes will no doubt but more valuable for low value tickets compared to using plastic).

The new machines are also able to take PayWave cards in future, although there are seperate issues which some research has found on this:

1) People are reluctant to get their credit card or purse/wallet out of their bags as it is advertsing it to pickpockets

2) Not everyone has a PayWave card, and not all banks give them out

2) There may actually be another charge by the bank to use PayWave for transactions (details of this are sketchy at best as mos of the PayWave readers have been installed free as part of trials).

Time will tell.
 

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Paywave things are almost commonplace in London now. Subway, EAT., McDonalds, Pret, Caffe Nero all have them. Even Greggs does. However, I have never seen anyone use it. I see a lot of people do have the logo to do it on their cards, but still, never seen it happen.

I think notes are the best thing. If a 3 zone ticket is £3 or a day ticket for ~£4, people are can just use a £5 or £10 note. Seems convenient. I struggled to get my £3 for my Metro fare this morning. I had to buy a pasty from Raby Street Greggs to break into my £10 note. I didn't even want a pasty, but it was cheaper than a drink and I couldn't take a cake at 7.30am.
 

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Between Manors and Byker
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569 Posts
I think notes are the best thing. If a 3 zone ticket is £3 or a day ticket for ~£4, people are can just use a £5 or £10 note. Seems convenient. I struggled to get my £3 for my Metro fare this morning. I had to buy a pasty from Raby Street Greggs to break into my £10 note. I didn't even want a pasty, but it was cheaper than a drink and I couldn't take a cake at 7.30am.
The note acceptor will no doubt be the most used of the new features, although cards will be probably quite common for the higher value tickets like the weekly saver.

From working on stations during busy events the main complaint is that the machines don't take notes (good 80% of people I'd say wanted to use notes and not cards when they've asked for help).
 

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Between Manors and Byker
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I think notes are the best thing. If a 3 zone ticket is £3 or a day ticket for ~£4, people are can just use a £5 or £10 note. Seems convenient. I struggled to get my £3 for my Metro fare this morning. I had to buy a pasty from Raby Street Greggs to break into my £10 note. I didn't even want a pasty, but it was cheaper than a drink and I couldn't take a cake at 7.30am.
The note acceptor will no doubt be the most used of the new features, although cards will be probably quite common for the higher value tickets like the weekly saver.

From working on stations during busy events the main complaint is that the machines don't take notes (good 80% of people I'd say wanted to use notes and not cards when they've asked for help).
 

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Why was this just demolished? Was it ever considered to be part of the metro network in the planning stages?

In a quiick examination of my 1960s/1970s records of the planning for the Metro, I can find no indication of plans for its use.

It is not shown on the earliest of 'planning' Metro Maps either, as shown by the below "extract" from an early post on the Historic Newcastle Thread . .

Newcastle Historian; November 10th 2009 said:
The Famous METRO MAP . . .
The evolution of the METRO MAP, from 1969 to the present day.


1 - 1969 (Pre-system opening) the original Tyneside PTE proposed route, from "Rapid Transit for Tyneside" published by Tyneside PTE



2 - 1971 (still pre-opening) and the 'diagramatic' map first appears. NOTE, the station called 'Osborne', in between West Jesmond and Jesmond stations. This map is from 'Public Transport on Tyneside, a Plan for the People', by Tyneside PTE.

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Part Time Contributor
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A question- in a fit of net searching leading from one thing to the other I eventually stumbled on this;
http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/s/st.peters/index.shtml
It seems there was an entire loop down the Walker triangle in ye olde days that I was not aware of.
Why was this just demolished? Was it ever considered to be part of the metro network in the planning stages?
This piece from the site you mentioned explains the situation:

The branch was reprieved in 1964 pending construction of a road between Hadrian Road, Wallsend, and Bewicke Road, Willington Quay. In 1971, after reviewing Tyneside's transport requirements, the PTE decided not to subsidise the Riverside branch under the Terms of the 1968 Transport Act . In mid-1972, the road linking Carville, Point Pleasant, and Willington Quay was built, and closure of the line was again recommended. On 17 April 1973 consent was given on the understanding that replacement bus licences would be obtained by 23 July 1973. It was acknowledged that a moderate amount of hardship would be caused to a small number of passengers owing to increased journey time and road congestion, especially to users of St Peters and Walker stations.

The Riverside Branch was built primarily to service the pasenegr needs of the ship yards and associated industry on the northern bank of the Tyne but as those industries went into decline so did the Branch.

Looking at the population area's around the Branch today it looks like the PTE got that decision right :)

The original track way is now a public walk way and details can be seen on this leaflet @ http://www.nationaltrail.co.uk/hadrianswall/uploads/HadriansWay.pdf
 

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Modern Antiquarian
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http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=85339530&postcount=88

The Riverside branch never had that many trains. There was a two hourly service until about 1910, then a hourly one until the early 1940s and thereafter a less regular service.
The Riverside Branch always had a relatively limited service but in later years it was tied to the shifts at the shipyards so the few trains there were were usually heavily loaded. There were also trains that didn't appear in the public timetable. After the closure to passengers part of the line remained open to serve a scrap yard at St Peter's.
 

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King of Bernicia
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This piece from the site you mentioned explains the situation:

The branch was reprieved in 1964 pending construction of a road between Hadrian Road, Wallsend, and Bewicke Road, Willington Quay. In 1971, after reviewing Tyneside's transport requirements, the PTE decided not to subsidise the Riverside branch under the Terms of the 1968 Transport Act . In mid-1972, the road linking Carville, Point Pleasant, and Willington Quay was built, and closure of the line was again recommended. On 17 April 1973 consent was given on the understanding that replacement bus licences would be obtained by 23 July 1973. It was acknowledged that a moderate amount of hardship would be caused to a small number of passengers owing to increased journey time and road congestion, especially to users of St Peters and Walker stations.

The Riverside Branch was built primarily to service the pasenegr needs of the ship yards and associated industry on the northern bank of the Tyne but as those industries went into decline so did the Branch.

Looking at the population area's around the Branch today it looks like the PTE got that decision right :)

The original track way is now a public walk way and details can be seen on this leaflet @ http://www.nationaltrail.co.uk/hadrianswall/uploads/HadriansWay.pdf
I dunno, there's quite a lot of housing down there, keeping the whole 'loop' open would have been a bit much but going part way would have been good.
Not to mention the future- when they finally get around to redeveloping the land that SH is on the area could pick up.
 

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Between Manors and Byker
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569 Posts
Was talking to a guy from the depot about this one day, and he had started on the railway before the Metro came in. According to him, when the Metro was in planning, there was a long term asperation to include the Riverside branch in future expansion. However, with the economic crises at the time, the original Metro system itself was very lucky to still get the funding, so any expansion plans were put on the back burner.

As the years passed, the industry shut down and there was a perceived lack of demand - low patronage on the BR system (could be down to the low service pattern as well), and it wouldn't have been economical to include it in the Metro system in later years. It would also be hard to justify as part of the line is within a few minutes walk of Wallsend or Hadrian Road stations.

If anyone drives near to the Total garage in Wallsend, look out for the square shaped building behind it - this is the old Carville signal box but without the box on top. Quite remarkable it has survived this long.
 

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cogito ergo sum
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There's another hint of the Walker line's potential for being kept alive to be seen in Byker.
While the trackbed in a cutting running up from the side of Hoults Estate towards Byker is indeed used as a walkway, when it reaches the new Shields Road Bypass, the Bypass was built to include the bridge in this StreetView image; the bridge was built over the route of the former line, and although it was created as a road leading to the rear of Clifford Street Police Station, it was skewed from the road alignment of Dalton Street so that it followed the (former) railway alignment instead.
In fact, there is a hump in the Bypass to accommodate the clearance required from the height of the trackbed.

BTW the nearby junction onto the Walker Branch was at the former Byker Station located on a site that is now Morrison's car park.
 

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In a quiick examination of my 1960s/1970s records of the planning for the Metro, I can find no indication of plans for its use.

It is not shown on the earliest of 'planning' Metro Maps either, as shown by the below "extract" from an early post on the Historic Newcastle Thread . .
Wow thanks for posting that diagramatic map. I've long been interested in the history of the metro and that's the first time I've seen that. First I've heard of an idea for a station at Osborne Road too I wonder why they didn't go for it in the end
 

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Wow thanks for posting that diagramatic map. I've long been interested in the history of the metro and that's the first time I've seen that. First I've heard of an idea for a station at Osborne Road too I wonder why they didn't go for it in the end?
Welcome to the Forum magnet!

There was a potentially vacant plot in the location where Osborne Station could have been intended to be, at the time, as an old church halfway up Osborne Road (opposite the junction with Osborne Avenue) had just been demolished.

A Care Home was rapidly built on the plot though.

You will find a fair few more 'historical' Metro Maps if you visit the original post, from which the early diagrammatic map (shown above) is just an excerpt.

Links to this post and many others on the subject can be found in the Index Thread, one of the 'Sticky' threads at the top of the forum, under "M" for Metro.

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Modern Antiquarian
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834 Posts
It's also interesting to see that the green Line (in practice the blue line) was originally projected to end at Wallsend rather than at North Shields.
 

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Between Manors and Byker
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569 Posts
It's also interesting to see that the green Line (in practice the blue line) was originally projected to end at Wallsend rather than at North Shields.
I've got a working timetable from the mid-1980s which shows that there were diagrams for St. James - Wallsend services which could be adopted if needed. Also, there were plans at the time for limited stop services around the Coast by the PTE (mentioned in one of their 3 year plans).

TOON FAN said:
Also, I overheard a metro driver saying that the new train had over 100 electrical faults!
Unless the driver is a qualified electrician then he can hardly comment on it - in fact many of the drivers complain that they are given too little information about the work going on. I know for a fact that there are no where near as many faults as that, and a few are to be expected which is why the whole commissioning process is there.
 

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There are more photos on the following website.

http://www.nexus.org.uk/metro/all-change

Also, I overheard a metro driver saying that the new train had over 100 electrical faults!
Looks fresher but the seats are disappointingly similar to the existing, not to mention that the remodeled front end seems not to have materialised!
 
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