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In terms of the shipping related to car import/export on the Tyne which is mainly Nissan but also some VW, Audi, Subaru and Cheverolet, I thought I'd give a little insight for anyone interested.

The most frequent car carriers to be found on the Tyne are the Nissan 'City' ships. They are the smallish blue and white ships weighing about 10,000gt. There are five identical city ships which frequent the Tyne called the 'City of' Barcelona, Sunderland, Amsterdam, Paris and Rome. There are two other 'city' ships named the Lettuce and the Nordic, these two are slightly smaller and different looking but are city ships nonetheless.

City of Barcelona:


City ships generally take loads of 800 Nissans at a time, usually the models Quasqai, Note and Micra and ship them to Amsterdam for the European market. They also ship to various other ports around western Europe such as Le havre and Barcelona. The city ships also import Nissan models made at the Barcelona plant to the Tyne mainly the Nissan Navarra and Pathfinder but also vans too.

The next class of car carrier to be found on the Tyne are the 'Highway' and 'Ace' ships. These ships are around 25,000gt mark but can be up to 35,000gt and are of generally similar designs capable of holding around 2500 cars.

Seine Highway:



Baltic Ace:



The Highway ships generally take loads of Quashqai, Note, Micra, Teana and Infiniti bound for the Russian and Scandanavian market. Ace ships generally ship to the Med to places like Italy, greece and Turkey.

Finally, we have the 'Motherships' which roam periodically around the world. These are vessells which differ in size from around the 27,000gt mark up to the huge 70,000gt vessels capable of carrying between 2500 and 9500 vehicles.

Currently there are two mother vessels which frequent the Tyne more often than any other they are the 27500gt Hoegh 'Mumbai' and 'Chennai' These take loads of upto 3,000 and ship them all around Europe.

Mumbai:



Chennai:



Occasionally, around once or twice a month, the really big motherships will arrive on the Tyne. These ships will have a capacity for up to 9500 cars and will be full of all makes of cars imaginable and will usually be discharging Nissan cars made in Japan for the British and European market namely the Nissan 370, the Nissan GTR and XTrail. As well as cars from Nissans luxury car division called 'Infinity'. They will take loads of Nissans bound for places such as the far east, Australia, New Zealand, the Middle East (yes even Iraq and Iran!), and Africa (even Zimbabwe!!:eek:hno: :lol:)

A few examples of these huge motherships to be found on the Tyne are:

Hoegh Detroit:



Sydney:



Asia:



Africa:



There are also other motherships that are not part of the HUAL group which use the Tyne.

TheNordic Spirit:



And my personal favourites the big red STX Pan Ocean ships!

Auto Atlas:



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I do hope DFDS's regular service to Ijmuiden is finding plenty of punters. I use it once or twice a year and find it excellent, but the almost daily spamming I am suddenly getting from DFDS has a hint of desperation about it. Anyone know anything?
 

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I do hope DFDS's regular service to Ijmuiden is finding plenty of punters. I use it once or twice a year and find it excellent, but the almost daily spamming I am suddenly getting from DFDS has a hint of desperation about it. Anyone know anything?
Are you on about the Faroe Islands ferry which is to run later this year for xmas shoppers, and hopefully start a regular service, so the Faroe Islanders will come to Newcastle for their shopping instead of Norway and Iceland?
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Are you on about the Faroe Islands ferry which is to run later this year for xmas shoppers, and hopefully start a regular service, so the Faroe Islanders will come to Newcastle for their shopping instead of Norway and Iceland?
:lol: just seen that.

Faroe Islands residents head to Tyneside for their Christmas shopping

Nov 1 2009 by Nicky Gardner, Sunday Sun
Faroes, Tórshavn Harbour

TYNESIDE is preparing for a friendly invasion next month as residents of the remote Faroe Islands head south for a shopping spree.

The scatter of mountainous islands, halfway between the Shetlands and Iceland, are wild and windy. And the Faroese have a long tradition of escaping their northern homeland for a dose of pre-Christmas cheer.

So, in early winter each year, some 1400 Faroese revellers board the Norröna, a handsome cruise ferry operated by Faroese company Smyril Line, to go Christmas shopping.

This year Smyril Line has opted for Newcastle for the seasonal cruise to civilisation, so Faroese fishermen, farmers and their families will get a taste of English Christmas. The Norröna will enter the Tyne early on Tuesday December 1 and dock at Northumbrian Quay in North Shields.

Bright city lights and the chance of a night out on the town are not standard Faroese fare. The capital city of the Faroes, Tórshavn, is hardly bigger than Hexham.

Small though their homeland may be, the Faroese are fiercely independent and have their own parliament, language and currency (the Faroese króna). The islands are outside the European Union.

“Yes, I’m looking forward to seeing Newcastle,” said Jákup Joensen as he tinkered with the motor of his fishing boat on the Faroese island of Sandoy last weekend.

“I’ve heard all about turkey and mince pies, but I’m not sure they’ll be a match for a good whale steak,” said Jákup referring to the Faroese affection for whaling, a sport that often invites criticism of the islands by outsiders.

The Norröna will berth overnight at North Shields, and weigh anchor on Wednesday afternoon for the journey back north to Tórshavn. Sources in the Faroes say that the Norröna’s first visit to the Tyne may not be her last.

There is talk of Smyril Line tinkering with the Norröna’s regular schedules from 2011 and even a rumour that a Newcastle stop could feature on the ship’s regular schedules.

For the North East, the loss of the DFDS ferry routes to Norway last year was a harsh blow. Cast back a few years and Tyneside enjoyed several Scandinavian links. Over the years they have vanished. First Denmark, then Sweden and then in 2008 Norway.

The old Tyne Commission Quay is looking decidedly empty these days and if Smyril could be tempted to add a regular Newcastle stop, it would open up a raft of new travel possibilities for Tynesiders. The Norröna schedule includes a weekly run from Esbjerg in Denmark to the Faroes and Iceland.

Smyril Line has tried British ports of call in the past, stopping off for some years at the Shetlands and for two summer seasons at Scrabster in northeast Scotland.

But high port charges and difficulty in drumming up business at the two Scottish ports prompted Smyril to drop them, leaving some slack in the schedule that could be to Newcastle’s advantage.

For the Faroe Islands, the Norröna is a lifeline. Without the ship, the shelves of shops in Tórshavn would be empty of produce from the continent, and fresh fish from the Faroes could never be sold in Denmark’s lucrative fish markets.

Cargo may be the Norröna’s bread and butter, but the sleek cruise ferry is also important in bringing summer visitors to both the Faroes and Iceland.

If Tyneside can pull out all the stops in December and get those mince pies just right, the rewards could be high. Regular calls by the Norröna could bring a lot of tourist traffic to the North East.

--

However Seamaster is talking about the Amsterdam route. My mum just got back from there on friday and said the ferry was packed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Some positive shipbuilding news:


TYNESIDE shipbuilder A&P Tyne has landed a £55m deal to build two sections of the country's future flagship vessels, the HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales.

The contract, with the Aircraft Carrier Alliance (ACA) consortium, will see many of the firm's 210-strong workforce working on the project over the next five years.

The sections of the ship which are being built on Tyneside will make up part of the mid section of the aircraft carriers. These will make up approximately 4,000 tonnes of each ship, which is the equivalent of over 420 double decker buses.

ACA Programme Director Geoff Searle said: "This is a fantastic day for A&P Tyne and the Aircraft Carrier Alliance. These carriers will be this country’s future flagships so our primary focus and that of our contractors is ensuring we deliver the best vessels possible to the Royal Navy.

"The commitment of the Tyneside workforce to building these ships for the UK Armed Forces is very evident and I am delighted that A&P Tyne is now officially on contract and has started to make great progress on the first ship."

A&P Group managing director David Skentelbery said: "Our Hebburn workforce has a proud tradition of delivering a first rate job and I have no doubt that they will continue to do so on this hugely prestigious project.

"At A&P Tyne, we are set to deliver a substantial part of these ships and I am delighted that we can represent the North East on the project."

Constituency MP for Jarrow and the A&P Tyne yard in Hebburn, Stephen Hepburn said: "This is an historic day for the shipbuilding in the North East. It is fantastic that the A&P Tyne workforce, particularly the young apprentices starting a career at the yard will have the opportunity to work on a project which is so important to the nation."
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
£5.75m bid to rescue North Shields fish quay

Nov 11 2009 by Sonia Sharma, Evening Chronicle
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A MULTI-MILLION pound rescue plan has been launched to save an ageing quay structure essential to the region’s fishing industry.

Western Quay, a major berthing section at the western end of North Shields Fish Quay, in North Tyneside, is in need of urgent repair.

Decades of constant use by fishing vessels, as well as the impact of the weather and North Sea tides, have taken their toll. The area is used by up to 80 trawlers a day, landing fish and prawn.

The structure, owned by the Port of Tyne and leased to the North Shields Fish Quay Co, was at risk of closure.

But now a team, brought together by North Tyneside Council, has agreed to carry out a £5.75m scheme to ensure Western Quay serves the industry for decades to come.

Work on the project, run jointly by the Port of Tyne, the council, the Fish Quay Co, One North East and the Marine and Fisheries Agency, will begin on site from November 16 and is expected to finish in October next year.

North Tyneside’s Mayor Linda Arkley said: “Western Quay is vital to the success of the fishing industry and the future of North Shields Fish Quay, which as a designated port supports the whole regional fleet.

“It is where the bigger fishing vessels berth and an integral part of the visitor experience to the Fish Quay. As a council we could not stand back and allow it to deteriorate further and are delighted to have the support of our partners to ensure this urgent work is delivered.”

The initiative will be funded by £2m from the European Fisheries Fund, £1.5m from the council, £1.2m from One North East and £1m from Port of Tyne.

Alan Clarke, chief executive of One North East, said: “This project is essential for large-scale fishing to continue in the North East, which currently supports around 1,200 regional jobs.

“The Fish Quay is a unique regional facility and this investment from One North East and our partners to renew the Western Quay will build on the major regeneration work that has already taken place at this thriving visitor and commercial centre.”

Andrew Moffat, chief executive at the Port of Tyne, added: “For centuries the Fish Quay has served the community well, providing economic prosperity and a strong regional identity to North Shields.

“The Port of Tyne is keen to sustain the Quay, not only for future generations but also to support the fishing industry.”

Jeremy Pritchard, managing director of North Shields Fish Quay Company, said: “That such leading organisations are supporting this project is testament to the importance of commercial fishing and its associated employment to this region.

“This work not only consolidates the premier status that North Shields enjoys as the leading port in England and Wales for prawn landings, but it will also improve a much-valued public amenity for future generations to enjoy.”
 

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^^^ Why are the ships being built in modules and assembled? Is building a whole ship in one yard an out of date thing now?
It's the way it's done these days. I saw a documentary on the construction of one of the big Royal Carribean ships (Voyager of the Seas or summat) and that was built in modules. It's a more flexible approach, especially if there are lots of similar sections, and it allows bits to be built in different locations and simulatneously.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
even back in the olden days the tyne shipping yards would share orders, some parts would be constructed elsewhere and then fitted out later. specifically engineered fitments would be ordered from as far away as glasgow and birmingham. i suppose this is just the modern way equivalent.
 

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Probably a shot in the dark but does anyone know anything about the strengthening work seen here on the cliffs at Tynemouth priory?

Ive always been intrigued by it as it seems such a massive undertaking and was wondering when the work was carried out? Ive seen pics from around 1900 and it was there then so I am assuming it was done in 18 hundred and something?

 
G

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Since this subforum covers south northumberland we may as well include discussion about Blyth's port if anyone is interested in that.

I'd like to seeing as I can see it from where I'm sitting right now ;)

Well actually to be honest I've not got much to say about it. Just that there was plans a short while back to move the entire port operation lock, stock and barrel over to where the power station used to be. The advantage of this would have been the port would have rail access and direct access to the 189 dual carriageway. Meaning lorries not needing to go through the streets of Cowpen or South Beach.

Another advantage would be the freeing of prime land in Blyth (don't laugh - it exists, honest!) for development.

Anyway, what I also wanted to talk about was a suggestion from a friend of mine. That being Blyth's port operations should be moved to the River Tyne to merge in with the Port of Tyne. And Blyth would then concentrate on building renewable power stations (wave, wind, nuclear, whatever).

Got me thinking perhaps it's time we had a strategic plan for this region as to who does what. So rather then competing amongst one another we make what we do in the North East as strong as possible to compete against other regions/countries.

Am I being unrealistic?
 
G

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I do hope DFDS's regular service to Ijmuiden is finding plenty of punters. I use it once or twice a year and find it excellent, but the almost daily spamming I am suddenly getting from DFDS has a hint of desperation about it. Anyone know anything?
Been on that ferry a few times, cracking atmosphere - sadly I think cheap air travel is going to kill it off :(
 
G

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:lol: just seen that.

Faroe Islands residents head to Tyneside for their Christmas shopping

Nov 1 2009 by Nicky Gardner, Sunday Sun
Faroes, Tórshavn Harbour

TYNESIDE is preparing for a friendly invasion next month as residents of the remote Faroe Islands head south for a shopping spree.

The scatter of mountainous islands, halfway between the Shetlands and Iceland, are wild and windy. And the Faroese have a long tradition of escaping their northern homeland for a dose of pre-Christmas cheer.

So, in early winter each year, some 1400 Faroese revellers board the Norröna, a handsome cruise ferry operated by Faroese company Smyril Line, to go Christmas shopping.

This year Smyril Line has opted for Newcastle for the seasonal cruise to civilisation, so Faroese fishermen, farmers and their families will get a taste of English Christmas. The Norröna will enter the Tyne early on Tuesday December 1 and dock at Northumbrian Quay in North Shields.

Bright city lights and the chance of a night out on the town are not standard Faroese fare. The capital city of the Faroes, Tórshavn, is hardly bigger than Hexham.

Small though their homeland may be, the Faroese are fiercely independent and have their own parliament, language and currency (the Faroese króna). The islands are outside the European Union.

“Yes, I’m looking forward to seeing Newcastle,” said Jákup Joensen as he tinkered with the motor of his fishing boat on the Faroese island of Sandoy last weekend.

“I’ve heard all about turkey and mince pies, but I’m not sure they’ll be a match for a good whale steak,” said Jákup referring to the Faroese affection for whaling, a sport that often invites criticism of the islands by outsiders.

The Norröna will berth overnight at North Shields, and weigh anchor on Wednesday afternoon for the journey back north to Tórshavn. Sources in the Faroes say that the Norröna’s first visit to the Tyne may not be her last.

There is talk of Smyril Line tinkering with the Norröna’s regular schedules from 2011 and even a rumour that a Newcastle stop could feature on the ship’s regular schedules.

For the North East, the loss of the DFDS ferry routes to Norway last year was a harsh blow. Cast back a few years and Tyneside enjoyed several Scandinavian links. Over the years they have vanished. First Denmark, then Sweden and then in 2008 Norway.

The old Tyne Commission Quay is looking decidedly empty these days and if Smyril could be tempted to add a regular Newcastle stop, it would open up a raft of new travel possibilities for Tynesiders. The Norröna schedule includes a weekly run from Esbjerg in Denmark to the Faroes and Iceland.

Smyril Line has tried British ports of call in the past, stopping off for some years at the Shetlands and for two summer seasons at Scrabster in northeast Scotland.

But high port charges and difficulty in drumming up business at the two Scottish ports prompted Smyril to drop them, leaving some slack in the schedule that could be to Newcastle’s advantage.

For the Faroe Islands, the Norröna is a lifeline. Without the ship, the shelves of shops in Tórshavn would be empty of produce from the continent, and fresh fish from the Faroes could never be sold in Denmark’s lucrative fish markets.

Cargo may be the Norröna’s bread and butter, but the sleek cruise ferry is also important in bringing summer visitors to both the Faroes and Iceland.

If Tyneside can pull out all the stops in December and get those mince pies just right, the rewards could be high. Regular calls by the Norröna could bring a lot of tourist traffic to the North East.

--

However Seamaster is talking about the Amsterdam route. My mum just got back from there on friday and said the ferry was packed.
Brilliant, we could do with forging new links like this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
I think Blyth has quite a bit of potential as a port actually, and if the estuary was dredged and widened, and the power station and farmland opposite concreted over you'd have a lot of storage space for containers etc.
 
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