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WARREN
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^^ I remember a decade ago after Michael Costa's cuts that the Bankstown line's weekend service consisted of one Liverpool via Bankstown train every 30 minutes. And you'd wait 28 minutes for it and it always seemed to be an old S set that would rock up.

It was the same on the Inner West line too, the only service was one Bankstown via Regents Park train every 30 minutes. That was the only train that actually stopped anywhere between Redfern and Ashfield.

It was pretty crap.

But Labor is better for public transport!!!!!1111111 :yes::eek:hno:
 

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Oh but there was no net reduction in service because, see now we run 8 cars everywhere by SWTT instead of 50 out of 52 weekends by STN
 

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^^ I remember a decade ago after Michael Costa's cuts that the Bankstown line's weekend service consisted of one Liverpool via Bankstown train every 30 minutes. And you'd wait 28 minutes for it and it always seemed to be an old S set that would rock up.

It was the same on the Inner West line too, the only service was one Bankstown via Regents Park train every 30 minutes. That was the only train that actually stopped anywhere between Redfern and Ashfield.

It was pretty crap.

But Labor is better for public transport!!!!!1111111 :yes::eek:hno:
Your just not a true believer, but believe me - Labor are best for public transport.

Let me prove it to you...

https://www.chrisminns.org/


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I don't get the obsession from some people, including Zoom, about the gap fillers. I would rather the rebuilt stations had straight platforms but apparently they won't, so gap fillers, however constructed, are the next best thing.

I just don't think the design of such things, is that important. Of course we won't to avoid pointless failures that imperil the whole line due to a faulty gap filler, but if they are maintaining the thing they should be able to fix a failure fairly quickly.
I wouldn't call commenting on a post an obsession...unless the rules have changed for 2020??
for the straight platforms there shouldn't be any issues as long as the rolling stock aligns with the platform. for the curved stations (and no matter how much you want them straightened) there has to be some sort of gap filler from a safety perspective. my suggestion above is one of many im sure !
 

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I don't get the obsession from some people, including Zoom, about the gap fillers. I would rather the rebuilt stations had straight platforms but apparently they won't, so gap fillers, however constructed, are the next best thing.

I just don't think the design of such things, is that important. Of course we won't to avoid pointless failures that imperil the whole line due to a faulty gap filler, but if they are maintaining the thing they should be able to fix a failure fairly quickly.
I strive for a higher class of obsession, thank you :)

This all started because originally they were going to straighten all the Bankstown line platforms, except, curiously, one station. Then they got cold feet over the length of time that construction would take. So, then they put out a new EIS saying that they'd apply a fresh coat of paint and some gap fillers.

And then there was a discussion about mechanical gap fillers. Look, I'd be quite happy if they paid me to design a mechanical gap filler for them. You want reliable? You want "it just works, and keeps working"? Then pay me enough. It can be done. I think Pintpot's phrase was "Its not beyond the wit of man". True.

Anyhow, recently I came across the passive rubber gap fillers at Brisbane airport station. First time I've seen those, so obviously I had to jump up and down on one and I was quite impressed at its rigidity/stability.

You know one of the basic tenets of good engineering is that you don't go and make up complex machines when a simple lump of metal and rubber will do the job. Ok, so these gap fillers probably can't deal with tight curves, but as I said, they can deal quite well with some curvature. Provided you're comfortable with a bit of contact and eventual wear.

To be honest, if I were in charge of this, I'd have insisted that they come up with a better methodology for rebuilding the stations. One that gets the job done quicker and leaves straight platforms. But I'm also quite confident that if they do resort to mechanical gap fillers, they'll be well designed, and hideously expensive and I won't get a cent. Sucks.

So.. its not something I'm going to waste too much energy thinking about...
 

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Champagne Socialist
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https://www.sydneymetro.info/article/tunnelling-under-city-centre-now-complete-historic-achievement



20/1/20
Tunnelling under city centre now complete in historic achievement

Sydney Metro tunnelling has finished under the city centre in a historic milestone.

Four out of five mega tunnel boring machines are now finished work – all that remains is the completion of a second metro railway tunnel deep under Sydney Harbour.

More than 97 per cent of tunnelling is now complete.

Tunnel boring machine (TBM) Mum Shirl was the fourth mega borer to finish work, breaking through a wall of rock at the new Barangaroo Station.

Since starting work at Marrickville in November 2018, Mum Shirl took about 14 months to build an 8.1-kilometre tunnel to Barangaroo, cutting through sandstone and shale to excavate more than 821,000 tonnes of rock - enough to fill 126 Olympic swimming pools.

About 29.5km of 31km of twin metro tunnels between Chatswood and Sydenham – or 97 per cent – are now complete with TBM Kathleen now digging under Sydney Harbour to finish her second under-harbour metro tunnel.

TBMs Nancy, Wendy and Mabel finished work late last year.

More than 8400 people have worked on the Sydney Metro tunnelling project between Chatswood and Sydenham, including under Sydney Harbour. The tunnelling works have employed about 560 tunnellers including carpenters, mechanical fitters, electricians and boilermakers.

At the site of the new Barangaroo Station, it took about two years to excavate about 460,000 tonnes of rock for the new station.
 

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Would extending the current service from Chatswood to Victoria Cross in the short term be too much extra work for the short term benefit?
 

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I strive for a higher class of obsession, thank you :)

This all started because originally they were going to straighten all the Bankstown line platforms, except, curiously, one station. Then they got cold feet over the length of time that construction would take. So, then they put out a new EIS saying that they'd apply a fresh coat of paint and some gap fillers.

And then there was a discussion about mechanical gap fillers. Look, I'd be quite happy if they paid me to design a mechanical gap filler for them. You want reliable? You want "it just works, and keeps working"? Then pay me enough. It can be done. I think Pintpot's phrase was "Its not beyond the wit of man". True.

Anyhow, recently I came across the passive rubber gap fillers at Brisbane airport station. First time I've seen those, so obviously I had to jump up and down on one and I was quite impressed at its rigidity/stability.

You know one of the basic tenets of good engineering is that you don't go and make up complex machines when a simple lump of metal and rubber will do the job. Ok, so these gap fillers probably can't deal with tight curves, but as I said, they can deal quite well with some curvature. Provided you're comfortable with a bit of contact and eventual wear.

To be honest, if I were in charge of this, I'd have insisted that they come up with a better methodology for rebuilding the stations. One that gets the job done quicker and leaves straight platforms. But I'm also quite confident that if they do resort to mechanical gap fillers, they'll be well designed, and hideously expensive and I won't get a cent. Sucks.

So.. its not something I'm going to waste too much energy thinking about...
That's the thing.

I'm sure some materials scientist can work out the wear rate for some very hard rubber bolted to the platform sides that scrapes against the train and can therefore be replaced on a known cycle.

For that matter, you could also devise some spring loaded wheels that push hard against the train, but are fundamentally pushed back against their springs by the approaching train and then release themselves again when the train is gone.
 

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That's the thing.



I'm sure some materials scientist can work out the wear rate for some very hard rubber bolted to the platform sides that scrapes against the train and can therefore be replaced on a known cycle.
Simply won't work on a curved platform.
If it fills the 20cm gap in the middle - it will get knocked off by the smaller gap at the ends.

On curved platforms you need mechanical fillers particularly on 3 door carriages.

Both the CAF and Alstom trams have small fixed gap fillers at every door.
 

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Simply won't work on a curved platform.
If it fills the 20cm gap in the middle - it will get knocked off by the 2cm gap at the ends.

On curved platforms you need mechanical fillers particularly on 3 door carriages.
Why the actual phuck would you have a 20cm gap? That is clusterphuck major. These 19th century engineers should have been strung from trees if they thought that was acceptable.
 
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