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Just put together a few of my favourite projects that unfortunately were never started/finished. Slightly depressing to see all this ambitious architecture that has been cast aside.

One Berkeley Court

Architect: Henning Larsen Architects

Landmark 37 storey tower standing 132 metres, sculpted like a diamond. It would have had at its base, a cultural quarter and would have been positioned at the entrance to the former Jurys Hotel and been centred on the median of Pembroke Road.



North Wall Quay

Architect: Zaha Hadid

Landmark flowing tower at North Wall Quay. Designed by Zaha Hadid, it would have faced the proposed U2 Tower.



U2 Tower

Architect: Foster and Partners

The original proposal for the Capital Docks site. The Norman Foster design was a tilted triangle. It had mainly luxury apartments, with a public viewing platform at 100m, just below an acoustically-insulated egg-shaped pod containing the U2 recording studio. Above this was to be an "energy centre" containing wind turbines and a large solar panel. The east and west facades were crinkled in the manner of fish scales, with concealed balconies. The north facade would have been sleek, while the south facade had further solar panels. The building would have straddled the end of Sir John Rogerson's quay, allowing traffic to pass through its base.



Fruit and Vegetable Market

Architect: HKR Architects

Along with the redevelopment of the Smithfield Fruit and Vegetable Market there was to be a new mixed use development designed by make architects.



Bifrost

Architect: 3XN

Speculative design for an eco-living development in Dublin called Bifrost. Arranged as a continuous unbroken building, the building is split up into a series of different areas that offer a total of 186,000 square meters of high density mixed-use space. Inside the figures of 8 are two large areas, one of which is accessible to the public and the other that will be for occupiers of the scheme, criss-crossed by a series of sky-bridges. The blocks were arranged so that the direct sunlight penetration can be the maximum so it can reach the full height without completely overshadowing the interior.



City Quay Proposal

Architect: Scott Tallon Walker

The scheme presented achieved 51 apartments and 16,000m2 of commercial space, representing a plot ratio of 9:1.



Drury Street

Architect: FKL Architects

A invited-competition entry by FKL for a commercial development in Drury Street in Dublin’s south city centre. Currently the site of a multilevel carpark. A mixed use building with several floors of apartments, three floors of offices, and five floors each of retail and parking. The various uses within the building are all accessed through a central twisting atrium.



Docklands Baths

Architect: Julien de Smedt Architects

The Dublin Docklands Open Air Bath sought to create a new and open public space that would have energize the newly developed surrounding area. A catalyst for growth of new social activity, this public bath also would have served as a link across the Grand Canal, consolidating the Docklands Area and continuing an important passage through the city of Dublin. Consisting of a children’s pool, diving pool, semi-Olympic pool, changing facilities, and a café, this addition to the Dublin Docklands would have maximized the potential for social development and land development.



National Concert Hall Redevelopment

Architect: 3XN

3XNs proposal for the hall was a sculptural showcase which created a new architecture for music and provided a framework for the historical context upon which the new concert hall would have sat. The Concert Hall would have been composed of three sculptural volumes, each of which contained its own individual concert hall.



The Watchtower

Architect: Scott Tallon Walker

There were plans to build a 120-metre skyscraper, which would have included apartments, office space, a miniature TV and radio studio, and rooftop bar and restaurant with panoramic views over Dublin Bay. Although the developer invested circa €15 in underground works, the project was abandoned due to the difficult economic climate faced by the developer.



Clarence Hotel

Architect: Foster and Partners

Costly development (possibly up to 150million) planned to revamp the Clarence Hotel on Wellington Quay, by rebuilding adjacent buildings, and adding several floors. The design got bogged down in the planning permission and appeals process, and eventually seems to have died.



VHI HQ, Abbey Street

Architect: McCauley Daye O'Connell

In 2004, VHI appointed McCauley Daye O’Connell to prepare a design to create a new high quality contemporary extension to its existing VHI Headquarters which incorporated Scot’s Church and also provides much needed additional office floor space.



Dublin Airport Control Tower

Architect: Scott Tallon Walker

Proposal to build an 87m control tower for Dublin Airport in conjunction with the construction of the parallel runway.



Dublin Central (Original)

Architect: BKD, McGarry Ni Eanaigh and Donnelly Turpin

The proposed Dublin Central development, encompassed shops, apartments, restaurants and an art gallery. The centrepiece of the plan was a 50-metre-high roof garden called the 'Park in the Sky' which would have offered panoramic views over the city.



National Convention Centre Hotel

Architect: Shay Cleary Architects

A proposal for a hotel which would have completed the new National Conference Centre. A pool, fitness centre and spa were to be located in a double height space on the eighteenth level, for the use of hotel guests. Above and below this were residential suites and hotel bedrooms, with multi-purpose business, recreational and guest’s amenities located at the top of the building approximately from levels thirty one to thirty six.



Liberty Hall Redevelopment

Architect: Giltoy McMahon Architects

The new Liberty Hall rebuilt on its historic site sought to be Dublin’s premier contemporary urban landmark. Situated downriver from the central O’Connell bridge its glass clad slender form rose in dramatic crystalline formation marking the transition of city to port. The building proposed a range of public facilities including theatre and conference facilities positioned just off a welcoming public hall at ground level with a dramatically accessed skydeck, exhibition and café at rooftop levels.




I realise a lot of these are quite controversial but I think collectively they would have improved the architecture of Dublin.

I'd love to hear which other proposals you wished had been built.

Credit for most of the information and photos has to go to Archiseek.
 

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Would have loved to see the majority of these built with the exception of bifrost and Drury Street. Wasn't keen on the Clarence redevelopment either. If only the financial crisis had held out to a few years later. I still see something being done with Liberty Hall in the next few years, possibly only a refurb though.
 

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The scrapping of the Watchtower building is a travesty especially when we see what's proposed recently for the area. Heuston Gate was another project that would look great on approach to Heuston station.
Great thread by the way.
 

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I'd love to see some of these still go ahead, namely:
-North Wall Quay
-Fruit and Vegetable Market
-City Quay
-Watchtower
-National Convention Centre Hotel

Are they all dead in the water at this stage?
 

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Great thread and idea but you're right, this is depressing. Heuston Gate was the one I really wanted to see go ahead but it never took off. That tower would of added a tasty approach towards the city centre coming from the N4/Con Colbert Road. We'll never see any of these projects I'm afraid which is an absolute pity.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'd love to see some of these still go ahead, namely:
-North Wall Quay
-Fruit and Vegetable Market
-City Quay
-Watchtower
-National Convention Centre Hotel

Are they all dead in the water at this stage?
I think City Quay will get a new proposal at this stage, although I'd be delighted if the developers sought planning for this scheme.

The fruit and veg market is going to be redeveloped soon BUT not included this development.

I would say the NCC Hotel will proceed to planning within the next year due to the shortage of hotel, however it will more than likely stick to the SDZ enforced height.

Dublin Airport Control Tower might get moving again now that they are about to start the process for the 2nd runway again.

Liberty Hall will more than likely have something done to it in the medium term.

Now that the Dublin Central site has been sold, the ball should get moving on that project again soon too.

Announced in November 2013 that a Children's Science Museum (Exploration Station) will be put in the west wing of the NCH. But I doubt we'll see much done to the building. ~Off topic but how can Dublin promote itself as a knowledge economy when we are one of the only big cities in Europe to not have a science museum, Dublin is really crying out for something like W5 in Belfast. And while I'm at it, can we get an aquarium on my wishlist too? ~

Think The Watchtower, Heuston Gate, U2 Tower, One Berkeley Court, Bifrost, Drury Street, and North Wall Quay are gone at this stage. Shame as these would have been without a doubt the most architecturally adventurous designs to be built in Dublin

Personally one of my favourite projects is the docklands baths, so I would love to see them on the table again. They would be an excellent facility for the community as well as Dublin as a whole and for tourists. Possibly use it to encourage more businesses like Wake Dock, to help promote Dublin as a water sports destination? Unlikely to happen though.
 

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And the metro North, Metro West, Dart underground we wait since ages that could make Dublin more attractive in transportation network...
 

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I dont think the delaying of the financial crisis would have saved projects like North Wall Quay or the U2 Tower. I doubt the economics of the projects ever made sense and given the long construction period, were always going to span into the next stage of the economic cycle. They really were just vanity projects. Personally, I'd say Dublin dodged a bullet with in the case of the North Wall Quay proposal. One Berkeley Court is the main one I would have liked to see built.

Other projects which never were, and never will be, built;

National Stadium, Abbotstown

How can we ever forget the Bertie Bowl?



National Childrens Hospital (Mater site)

Fortunately we now have a much prettier building for a site at St James Hospital.

 

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I dont think the delaying of the financial crisis would have saved projects like North Wall Quay or the U2 Tower. I doubt the economics of the projects ever made sense and given the long construction period, were always going to span into the next stage of the economic cycle. They really were just vanity projects. Personally, I'd say Dublin dodged a bullet with in the case of the North Wall Quay proposal. One Berkeley Court is the main one I would have liked to see built.

Other projects which never were, and never will be, built;

National Stadium, Abbotstown

How can we ever forget the Bertie Bowl?



National Childrens Hospital (Mater site)

Fortunately we now have a much prettier building for a site at St James Hospital.

We're talking about 30 storey buildings here Pete, not the Burj Khalifa. If Manchester and Liverpool can build them, as well as numerous much smaller American cities, then Dublin can.
 

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We're talking about 30 storey buildings here Pete, not the Burj Khalifa. If Manchester and Liverpool can build them, as well as numerous much smaller American cities, then Dublin can.
Buildings in other cities are irrelevant. I am talking about cost v return. Even now, with a big shortage of both office space and apartments and bigger demand than during the boom, heights permitted under the SDZ are not being taken advantage of. Look at The WatchTower site, rents soaring and foundations already in for the 120m tower, instead now we get a 73m no frils Ryanair style block. Even KW were reluctant to get the maximum floors from their Capital Docks site.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Buildings in other cities are irrelevant. I am talking about cost v return. Even now, with a big shortage of both office space and apartments and bigger demand than during the boom, heights permitted under the SDZ are not being taken advantage of. Look at The WatchTower site, rents soaring and foundations already in for the 120m tower, instead now we get a 73m no frils Ryanair style block. Even KW were reluctant to get the maximum floors from their Capital Docks site.
The Exo building application was submitted by receivers on behalf of NAMA, so I can't say I'm surprised that it was a very basic, bare minimum proposal. These people aren't developers. Personally I can't see the building as proposed actually being developed. Either DCC will ask for changes or the developer that buys the project will have another proposal. To be honest I think it's a waste of time and money applying for permission as this is not a normal site. Normally planning permission will add value however when the SDZ sets out so clearly how the development can proceed I don't think it will add much value.
 

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The Exo building application was submitted by receivers on behalf of NAMA, so I can't say I'm surprised that it was a very basic, bare minimum proposal. These people aren't developers. Personally I can't see the building as proposed actually being developed. Either DCC will ask for changes or the developer that buys the project will have another proposal. To be honest I think it's a waste of time and money applying for permission as this is not a normal site. Normally planning permission will add value however when the SDZ sets out so clearly how the development can proceed I don't think it will add much value.
And the fact that the receiver, who is looking to maximise the value of the site, doesn't even push for the maximum height indicates that there is little value in the additional floors.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
And the fact that the receiver, who is looking to maximise the value of the site, doesn't even push for the maximum height indicates that there is little value in the additional floors.
Personally I don't think they are adding anything to the value of the site though.Receivers are also by nature more risk adverse than developers. But I see your point at present there may be little demand for taller buildings due to the amount of development land available but i think in a few years we will definitely be back at a situation where land becomes more scarce, therefore prices will rise which in turn will make developing taller buildings more attractive.
 
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