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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It has been raised from the river bed to 3 metres below the surface and towed out to Formby point in Liverpool Bay. This allows shipping to used the river - a flotilla of ships manifested at the Mersey bar waiting to enter the river. The 1000 lb bomb will be detonated at 8:30 p.m. tonight - live on BBC News 24 .
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
bustcapl said:
woudl never have had the problem if they had just filled the river in... ha ha
They could build the Mersey barrage and pump out the estuary. Then they tile the bottom.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
scouserdave said:
Well then babe, did the earth move for you at half eight?
No it was late and only the sea moved. The effect was of a submarine being hit by a depth charge.
 

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Cork 2005
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Mersey bomb detonated in the sea

The bomb was discovered by the Royal Navy
A 500kg (1,102lb) World War II bomb found in the River Mersey has been detonated in a controlled explosion.
The device was found by the Royal Navy during a routine survey at Twelve Quays dock in Birkenhead on Monday night.

Spokesman Neil Smith said it was "one of the most powerful and destructive" bombs dropped on the city during WWII.

Navy divers moved the 2.1m (7ft) German penetration bomb out to deeper waters in the Irish Sea to detonate it safely at about 2100 BST.

The explosion caused a plume of water about 9m (30ft) high into the air, about 13km (8 miles) west of Formby Point.


A 400 metre exclusion zone was set up around the bomb at the time of the blast.

The discovery of the device caused travel chaos on the Mersey as two passenger ferries were prevented from docking due to safety concerns.

The Mersey Viking, which had 64 passengers and 55 crew, and the Dublin Viking, which had 81 passengers and 46 crew, arrived in the dock on Tuesday morning but were unable to dock until the afternoon.

The Norfolk Line ferries had travelled to Liverpool from Dublin and Belfast.

The Wallasey tunnel and a Merseyrail line were closed for about 45 minutes when the operation began, but Merseytravel said disruption was kept to a minimum.

Penetration bombs are designed to embed into a target before exploding

Royal Navy spokesman Neil Smith
The bomb was a German air-drop explosive used in the blitz.

The Navy said it would probably have been dropped in an attempt to destroy the Liverpool docks.

Experts dragged the bomb to North Bar Light, an area identified by the coastguard where it could be detonated safely.

A diver then attached plastic explosives to the device in order to detonate it.

Royal Navy spokesman Neil Smith said the device may have lain undetected for so long because penetration bombs are designed to embed into a target before exploding.

He said: "This is only speculation, but if the bomb landed on the river bed it may have buried itself and only recently been uncovered by recent high tides, for example.

"It is a little more unexpected to find one so close to a city, and that obviously made it more challenging.

"Explosions under water are more powerful than those above water, so clearly we could take no chances with public safety in terms of reverberations affecting ships and tunnels, so some people were delayed.

"We apologise for any inconvenience but I think people understand that public safety is the main priority."
 

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yep, the cameraman only just caught it as well.... and it wasn't worth waiting for. Similar to a trump in the bath I'm afraid.
 

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Cowboy of Love
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What i want to know is how the Royal Navy found it?
Were they looking for it or did the just happen to come across it buried at the bottom of the Mersey?
Surely shouldnt the Germans be disposing of this for us? Stick a few quid worth of stamps on it and pop it in the post 'Return to Sender'.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The Longford said:
What i want to know is how the Royal Navy found it?
Were they looking for it or did the just happen to come across it buried at the bottom of the Mersey?
They were doing a riverbed survey - why I don't know. They may have been commissioned to do it for civilian purposes, but they always gain anyway.

Surely shouldnt the Germans be disposing of this for us? Stick a few quid worth of stamps on it and pop it in the post 'Return to Sender'.
Many delayed actiion heavy mines were dropped in WW2. These stay on the bottom and then explode after a time. Only 25% have ever been recovered. The detonators are shot, so little chance of an explosion.

This bomb may have just been dropped speculatively, or attempting to get the Birkenhead river locks if there was some aim on it.

It was probably dropped during the May blitz in 1941. From 1st May to 7th May the full brunt of the Luftwaffe’s bombers was directed at Liverpool every night to take the port out of action before the invasion of the USSR. One of the Huskisson branch docks had an ammunition ship blow up which sent plates 2.5 miles inland. The dock was so badly damaged it was filled in.

My mother could imitate the sound of a German bombers as it approached and jettisoned its load – a slow rumble as the engines laboured and then they raced as the plane instantly had no load at all. When they heard the increased tone of the racing engines they knew they were to get it, when they kept labouring they knew further down would get it and they were OK - until the next bomber came. She lived near to Brunswick Dock. During the bombings many 1000s would walk out into the surrounding fields and sleep in the open as they saw the bombers destroy their homes. To their credit, the city of Manchester acted fast and sent in 1000s of firemen and civil defence and medical people.

In May 1941the RAF were nowhere to be seen, too busy thinking of protecting London and hanging out in country pubs with tarts. Only the few fighters at Speke and on the Wirral took to the air. Only AA guns and barrage balloons protected the city and the Luftwaffe had a largely uninterrupted rollock. The contempt of the south to the north is not just a new thing. Bombers hit the city from two angles; across the North Sea and follow the line of the ship canal, and from France, up the Irish Sea, see Dublin lit up in the west, turn right and there is Liverpool. Between the Irish and southerners who needs friends.

Liverpool was the most heavily bombed city in the UK in relation to its size. 550 unidentified victims of that week are buried in a mass grave in Anfield cemetery.
 

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Rock Lord
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John-MK said:
The contempt of the south to the north is not just a new thing. Bombers hit the city from two angles; across the North Sea and follow the line of the ship canal, and from France, up the Irish Sea, see Dublin lit up in the west, turn right and there is Liverpool. Between the Irish and southerners who needs friends.

Liverpool was the most heavily bombed city in the UK in relation to its size. 550 unidentified victims of that week are buried in a mass grave in Anfield cemetery.

Even this you turn in to a north south issue. :eek:hno:
 

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sjwmoore
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John-MK said:
In May 1941the RAF were nowhere to be seen, too busy thinking of protecting London and hanging out in country pubs with tarts. Only the few fighters at Speke and on the Wirral took to the air. Only AA guns and barrage balloons protected the city and the Luftwaffe had a largely uninterrupted rollock. The contempt of the south to the north is not just a new thing.

In May 1941 the night fighter, equipped with radar, was still in its infancy. Pretty pointless sending up day fighters, AA would have had some sort of detterent effect. It was logical to have day fighter along the Eastern and Southern areas for interception purposes. Nor was it all Southern, fighters were based from Shetland, and along the East coast. The raids by the Luftwaffe were different from the later RAF raids, which were in streams and allowed a 20 minute concentration of explosive- it was more of a case of individual aircraft or small groups arriving throughout the night, which again makes interception difficult. As for the lounging around in pubs, fighter sweeps across the channel to French and Dutch targets was an almost daily occurence- known as "Rhubarbs"
 

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sjwmoore
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John-MK said:
They were doing a riverbed survey - why I don't know.

Hydrographic and oceanographic surveying is the responsibility of the Royal Navy's Surveying Service, which has been operating throughout the world since the formation of the Hydrographic Department in 1795. The information from the surveys is used for producing Admiralty charts and nautical publications which have a world-wide sale and are used by ships of many nations.

The Surveying Flotilla consists of ocean-going ships, coastal vessels and inshore craft. In addition to surveying in overseas areas, ships of the flotilla are constantly engaged in updating the charts covering the waters around the United Kingdom. To carry out these wide-ranging tasks the latest surveying techniques are employed, including digitised echo sounders, side scan sonars, automated plotting and recording of position, depth, gravity and magnetic parameters. Satellite and inertial navigation systems are used when out of range of shore-based position fixing systems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
sjwmoore said:
In May 1941 the night fighter, equipped with radar, was still in its infancy. Pretty pointless sending up day fighters,
"Hitler agreed, and he ordered the Luftwaffe to throw its full force against the city. On 1st May 1941 a seven day Blitzkrieg (lightning war) was unleashed on Liverpool and Birkenhead. Bombs, land mines and incendiary devices (fire bombs) rained down day and night."

My Dad clearly remembered the Germans also came by day too, and the RAF were nowhere to be seen. Dog fights with JU88s were seen over the Mersey by the few fighters at Speke. Most just came and dropped their bombs on their targets facing only AA fire. No planes intercepted the bombers on their way, and they knew which ways they were coming from.
 
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