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Journeyman
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I used to live in Idaho. And the dad of a classmate (who I didn't know very well) is now in the US senate. And a right wing nutjob from what I understand. If I could get him out of office it might be worth living part time in Idaho. Boise is actually kind of nice in the older neighborhoods.
 

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Hahahahahahahahahaha


The idea of mhays appealing to a majority of voters anywhere, let alone Idaho, is hilarious to me! The man who hates just about everything and everyone is going to win over voters?!? Hahahahahahahahahaha
 

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Hahahahahahahahahaha


The idea of mhays appealing to a majority of voters anywhere, let alone Idaho, is hilarious to me! The man who hates just about everything and everyone is going to win over voters?!? Hahahahahahahahahaha
Ahhh...I don't think of mhays has a hater, more likely 'gruff'.
 

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Uptown Bound
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There's already a Trader Joe's a few blocks away, which I assume will go away. The nice thing is that it's currently in an old 1-story building with a parking lot in a nice location for re-development. It's only NC2-30 zoning, but it's in a Residential Urban Village (2nd and Galer here). Upper Queen Anne could really use an upzone here - I'd love to extend the Queen Anne Ave strip down Galer. There's a serious shortage of storefront space on QA, leading to crazy high rents and a lot of banks and too-expensive botiques.
I'm certainly looking forward to this project, but I disagree that upper QA needs a significant upzone. QA has a charm that is lacking in other neighborhoods, and I believe that an upzone would destroy this charm.

Also, I'm not so sure that upper QA needs a ton more storefront space. Sure, rents are high, but there is a ton of empty space too. Putting more space on the market may reduce rents, but I'm not sure if much space gets filled.
 

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I would love just a few, like 3 maybe, towers on the top of QA that would help pull our skyline past the Space Needle. That's all I want. They don't have to even be that tall really because the hill gives them substantial relative height already.
 

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Journeyman
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...I disagree that upper QA needs a significant upzone. QA has a charm that is lacking in other neighborhoods, and I believe that an upzone would destroy this charm.

Also, I'm not so sure that upper QA needs a ton more storefront space. Sure, rents are high, but there is a ton of empty space too. Putting more space on the market may reduce rents, but I'm not sure if much space gets filled.
Don't worry. Even if UQA has minor upzones someday, it won't have a major one. Unless the martians take over or something, it's politically impossible and would never be raised as a serious debate let alone get anywhere. Six stories could happen in our lifetimes...or yours, since I'll be cut short by the tapping on cars thing...

And I agree on retail. QAA is barely a cohesive street now, though it's approaching that for several blocks. Dilute it further and UQA will never have a solid retail street.
 

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I'm certainly looking forward to this project, but I disagree that upper QA needs a significant upzone. QA has a charm that is lacking in other neighborhoods, and I believe that an upzone would destroy this charm.

Also, I'm not so sure that upper QA needs a ton more storefront space. Sure, rents are high, but there is a ton of empty space too. Putting more space on the market may reduce rents, but I'm not sure if much space gets filled.
On the contrary, many of the quint storefronts have closed down because they can't afford increased rent. Otto Sushi, on the hill 10 years, gone - claiming they can't afford the rent. The Teacup, also here 10 years, gone - claiming she can't afford the rent. Flame, gone - though they've claimed to have merged with the pizza place next door (but not really, it's now a pizza place that serves burgers). Etc. Etc. I think you'll find these will be replaced with higher-margin buisiness. Fine dining, botique salons, etc. Those are fine in small amounts, but I'll sure miss the low-margin places with some character. You'll also see a high turnover, as people invest in their dreams but find they can't make the rent.

Empty storefronts don't mean there are too many stores - landlords adjust rents based on demand.
 

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QAA is barely a cohesive street now, though it's approaching that for several blocks. Dilute it further and UQA will never have a solid retail street.
Bah. It's been a cohesive street for over a hundred years. We have a high turnover because of the high rent. New developments have been interrupting the flow a bit as they're built, but not much.
 

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Journeyman
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It's not physically cohesive. There are breaks in the action. Fill those before encouraging or requiring more retail. I'd support coffee-n-quickeemart centers elsewhere.
 

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Uptown Bound
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I went to the QA Farmer's Market for the first time today and I was impressed. I didn't realize how busy it would be and there were a ton of people, food trucks, and even some live music! I'll be back next Thursday.
 

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Correspondent
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On vacation this week so things might be a little slow, but I'll get fully geeked about this when I return.

http://www.djc.com/news/re/12044524.html

August 31, 2012

Merrill, SRM to start 258 apartments on Taylor

R.D. Merrill formed Pillar Properties to diversity the company known for senior housing. Between 2010 and 2014, Pillar expects to build about 1,200 apartments in this region.

By LYNN PORTER
Journal Staff Reporter

Pillar Properties, the apartment division of R.D. Merrill Co., and SRM Development will start construction this fall on a 10-story, 258-unit apartment building in downtown Seattle.

Runberg Architecture Group designed the complex, which will be at 101 Taylor Ave. N. in the Denny Triangle.

Spokane-based SRM is the contractor and Bank of America is the lender. The Diamond family, which owns parking lots in the city and part of the development site, is the equity partner.

Pillar Vice President Billy Pettit said the Taylor Avenue project is expected to cost about $70 million.

The cast-in-place concrete structure should take 24 months to build, and will be constructed to Built Green standards.

The complex will have 54 studios, 154 one-bedrooms (32 open), 34 two-bedrooms and 16 townhomes. Studios will start at 575 square feet and two-bedroom/two-bath units will be nearly 1,100.

Units will have stainless steel appliances, granite countertops, wood flooring and floor-to-ceiling windows.

There will be 3,583 square feet of ground-floor retail, 281 underground parking stalls, a rooftop deck with a dog run and barbecue area, a fitness center, theater and lounge.

Seattle-based R.D. Merrill formed the apartment division in recent years to grow and diversity the company, which is known for senior housing. Between 2010 and 2014, it is expected to build nearly 1,200 apartments in the Puget Sound region.

Pillar is targeting young professionals in Seattle, specifically 18- to 32-year-olds — the so-called Echo Boom-Generation Y group — and others who have chosen to rent rather than own because of the lifestyle, Pettit said.

Pillar joins a number of developers who have been building apartments in downtown Seattle in recent years.

Dupre + Scott Apartment Advisors forecast last fall that nearly 5,400 new units would open in 2013 in the core areas of Seattle and Ballard. This is in addition to nearly 1,650 expected to open this year.

The focus on apartments has raised concerns about a bubble. But Pettit said he expects the market to hold up because of strong fundamentals.

“We have a growing population of a demographic (Gen Y) that has made it no secret that they're leaning toward the rental market, and I firmly think it's going to continue,” he said.

Others also are renting because of the cost of home ownership, difficulty getting financing or a down payment, and fear of the housing market, he said. And more people just want to live close to the urban core.

Pillar opened The Corydon in 2009 in the University District and The 101 in Kirkland in 2010. Together they have 169 units.

Pillar will open The Lyric, a 234-unit apartment complex on Capitol Hill, in November, and The Noble apartments in Wallingford, with 93 units, in February of 2013.

The firm also plans to build a 124-unit modular apartment complex in late 2013 or early 2014 at 5601 24th Ave. N.W. in Ballard, and another apartment project in Wallingford at North 42nd Street and Stone Way.

Its strategy is to hold apartments long term, Pettit said. However, he said, given the right opportunity the company may “at least entertain” selling some of the apartments or converting them to condos.

Pillar is also involved with Daniels Real Estate in the extensive Stadium Place mixed-use project in Pioneer Square.

Pillar Properties is named after Pillar Point on the Olympic Peninsula. It is land the Merrill family, descendents of Northwest timber pioneer R.D. Merrill, has owned for years.

R.D. Merrill Co. is the holding company for the descendents. It is known for its subsidiary Merrill Gardens, which owns and operates 56 senior housing communities in nine states, predominately in Washington and California.

 

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It is one of nicest apartment buildings! Am I only person here noticed that they kinda messed this rendering up a bit? At the front part, it shows 9 stories and back part, it shows 10 stories? Do we have more renderings of this building?
 

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It is one of nicest apartment buildings! Am I only person here noticed that they kinda messed this rendering up a bit? At the front part, it shows 9 stories and back part, it shows 10 stories? Do we have more renderings of this building?
It seems to me that that's because the land slopes down from front to back.
 
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