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College Realist
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just a fun idea I thought would be interesting. I made this thread a few days ago at SSP but I feel it will gain more ground here. If the mods don't mind, I will transfer some of my posts here just to get things rolling.


Every city seems to share some general characteristic with another city while still maintaining its uniqueness. These characteristics are surface level, but still cool to make note of.

For instance, the two cities I feel are analogues of each other on the surface are Brooklyn and San Francisco. Both are coastal urban areas at the ocean of their respective coasts. Brooklyn is not an independent city anymore like SF, but it could hold up to its own if it was.

Aerial/Map

Brooklyn:

Looking South at Brooklyn by Adam Lewis Wyner, on Flickr

San Francisco:

San Francisco by David Levine, on Flickr

Both cities have iconic bridges that connects them to the rest of their urban areas. However, Brooklyn is part of an island while SF is at the tip of a peninsula.

Bridges

Brooklyn:

Staten Island to Brooklyn by JoelICastaneda, on Flickr

Brooklyn Downtown 8380 by edgar ediza, on Flickr

Brooklyn Bridge at night by RJ DiBella, on Flickr

San Francisco:

The Golden Gate by buffdawgus, on Flickr

San Francisco by John King, on Flickr

San Francisco Street by Glenn Preisler, on Flickr


There are more similarities for this pair I will post but if anyone who has though about two other cities that are analogous in one way or another, feel free to share. :cheers:
 
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College Realist
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I know SF currently has the Salesforce Tower coming up and a currently larger and more vibrant downtown, but both it and Brooklyn have their CBDs skylines at a corner area pointing towards the mainland. The shot I found for SF is old.

Skylines

Brooklyn:

Brooklyn skyline, New York City by James Willamor, on Flickr


San Francisco:

San Francisco Skyline by Justin Owens, on Flickr


Both cities are also known for their rowhome housing architecture along with a good amount of apartments. Brooklyn has its brownstones and buildings mostly made of brick while SF has great examples of Victorian architecture like the famous Painted Ladies. They also both have nice terminal vistas, though SF is more dramatic with the hills and bay.

Housing architecture

Brooklyn:

Brownstones by Brandon, on Flickr

Park Slope by robotpolisher, on Flickr

42nd Street approaching 3rd Avenue by Aonghais Mac, on Flickr

4th Avenue by Matt Green, on Flickr

Brooklyn - 63rd Street by Roger W, on Flickr

Brooklyn Apartment 5506 by edgar ediza, on Flickr

San Francisco:

What ever happened to predictability? by Erin, on Flickr

San Francisco Street by Lindsey Krause, on Flickr

San Francisco Street by Freddie Jordan, on Flickr

San Francisco Business Trip by Sujal Parikh, on Flickr

P1090504 by Michael Afar, on Flickr

San Francisco - apartments on Hyde Street by MikePScott, on Flickr

East Coast and West Coast. Brothers from different mothers.
 
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College Realist
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9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Here's some last comparisons between Brooklyn and SF. These are just very surface level, so don't think too much about it.


Terminating Vistas

Brooklyn:


Brooklyn. by chris dilts, on Flickr


San Francisco:


San Francisco by fluido & franz, on Flickr


Chinatowns (SF has a larger more famous one but BK has one growing in Sunset Park)


Brooklyn:

The Big 8 by Chung Chu, on Flickr


San Francisco:


Chinatown by mi_tequila, on Flickr


Dense Suburban Housing Near Ocean (This really hits the nail for me in terms of superficial comparsions)


Brooklyn:

duplex8 by dodgedly, on Flickr


San Francisco:

Untitled by Patrick, on Flickr
 

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College Realist
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Someone mentioned Manhattan and San Francisco also being analogues, which is similar to the Brooklyn comparison, but deeper when you look at the neighborhoods and other characteristics.

Both are the densest urban areas in their respective coasts and are important financial and immigrant centers throughout US history. They are both geographically small, with Manhattan being smaller, and are both the heart of their respective metro areas.

There are some differences, seen in the Brooklyn comparison. Manhattan is denser and more city-like throughout while SF is only a tier below once you get to the outskirts.

Skyline with Bridge

San Francisco:

Bajo el Bay Bridge / Under the Bay Bridge by Jorge Alejandro Gomez, on Flickr

Manhattan:

New York by Tim RT, on Flickr


Chinatowns (Both have them close to the financial district)

San Francisco:

San Francisco 11 by Eloy Rodriguez, on Flickr

Manhattan:

Untitled by Dennis Hilding, on Flickr


Little Italy (Same situation with Chinatown, but SF's is also called North Beach)

San Francisco:

North Beach - Festival Booths by roland luistro, on Flickr


Manhattan:

Little Italy by Jørn Erik Langedal, on Flickr


Neighborhoods known for countercultural/ LGBT movements


San Francisco (Castro):


San Francisco 2008 by aurelien23, on Flickr

(Haight Ashbury)

Haight-Ashbury, San Francisco @ 2017.10.11 by GT, on Flickr

Manhattan (West Village):

rainy manhattan streets - west village - new york city by guney cuceloglu, on Flickr

(Greenwich Village)

Greenwich Village NYC by Ryan Price, on Flickr
 

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College Realist
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9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Here are some more comparisons between San Francisco and Manhattan.


Rich/Affluent Neighborhoods

San Francisco (Pacific Heights):

Alta Vista by Brandon Doran, on Flickr

Manhattan (Upper West Side):

The Lake and the Upper West Side skyline by Apostolis Giontzis, on Flickr


Large City Parks (I think both of them were designed by the same person)

San Francisco (Golden Gate Park):

Golden Gate Park and Ocean Beach in San Francisco by David Oppenheimer, on Flickr


Manhattan (Central Park):

Manhattan (central park) by Paco Gaitero, on Flickr


Hispanic/Latino Neighborhoods

San Francisco (Mission District/ mostly Mexican and Central American):

San Francisco-Mission District by emile lombard, on Flickr


Manhattan (Washington Heights/ mostly Dominican):

Alto Manhattan (Washington Heights) by 何塞埃利亚斯 (何塞·克鲁兹), on Flickr


African American Neighborhoods

San Francisco (Fillmore District/ Western Addition):

San Francisco / Western Addition's History by Mark Denton, on Flickr

Manhattan (Harlem):

Harlem by Miryam HaMagdalit, on Flickr
 

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Ars longa, vita brevis
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9,450 Posts
In Europe, many old cities have strong similarities, especially the medieval ones. For example, old cities from around the Western Mediterranean basin seem to form a continuum with gradually evolving nuances, starting from Spain, through Southern France, Italy, and onto Croatia and Corfu. It's the same towards the North, there seems to be a continuum from as East as Transylvania to as West as Burgundy in Eastern France. This is usually referred to as the Central European type of cities, but I see strong similarities further North (Hanseatic cities, Scandinavia).
 
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