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Only one of these countries could be described as "Anglo-Saxon" (UK). It is an ethnic group, not a language.
So Canadians, Australians, Americans and Kiwis have no relation to Great Britain at all? :|

Besides, I quote:

That horribly inaccurate source of Wikipedia said:
Outside Anglophone countries, both in Europe and in the rest of the world, the term "Anglo-Saxon" and its direct translations are used to refer to the Anglophone peoples and societies of Britain, the United States, and other countries such as Australia, Canada and New Zealand. The term can be used in a variety of contexts, often to identify the English-speaking world's distinctive language, culture, technology, wealth, markets, economy, and legal systems. Local variations include the French "Anglo-Saxon" and the Spanish "anglosajón".
 

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How does their relation make them "Anglo-Saxon"? Is India also an Anglo-Saxon country?

Anglophone =/= Anglo-Saxon.
Obviously you didn't read what was said in that quote properly. Are you just so desperate to attempt to prove someone wrong that you have lost the ability to read? Rightly or wrongly, Anglo-Saxon can be used to refer to the USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

Anyway, instead of arguing about semantics, how about staying on topic and discussing the issue at hand.
 

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Sure, it can be used incorrectly to describe them, just as this can incorrectly be described as pink:



Doesn't actually make it the case.
Right, and the shared culture and values that exist between the anglophone nations of course have no roots in Anglo-Saxon culture, right?

The very fact that Anglo-Saxon is used to refer to our shared cultures in academia (for example in this article here about the Socio-Cultural Environment for Entrepreneurship) shows that perhaps it is you, and not me, who doesn't understand the term Anglo-Saxon. :)
 

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Just because some people in academia use a term doesn't mean we 'plebeians' must accept it as some kind of ultimate truth. While no one would disagree that Canada has certain Anglo-Saxon roots, it is debatable whether you can still call it so. Many Canadians would disagree to their country being labeled as essentially 'Anglo-Saxon'.
It's more that those in academia are quite likely to use a "correct" term otherwise they'll be bombarded with letters from fellow academics who love to point out that they might be wrong. ;)

As for your comment about Canada being an "Anglo-Saxon" nation, I doubt many Brits in the street would consider the UK "Anglo-Saxon" given the ethnic diversity present in the UK these days, but that doesn't mean it doesn't have Anglo-Saxon roots that have strongly influenced the culture, laws, literature and history of that country. But I digress.

I only continued this line of discussion because of your fellow Canadian making such a song and dance about the use of a term which, in my mind (as well as others) was perfectly acceptable to use in a bid to score "one-up" on me.
 

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In Vienna public transport and the streets are full with pupils during the week. Its surprising that in the English speaking world people would not allow their children such a nice and important step of early emancipation. I think its an important thing to learn for children to navigate on their own and also to come home when they are supposed to on their own.
I agree with you 100%. I was quite lucky in as much as I was expected to walk home from school at an early age. From the age of middle school onwards I had to take public transport home on my own - good for survival skills indeed!
 

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No, its not about you, actually, but rather an inaccurate (and quite chauvinistic and patriarchal) description of 4 countries. Don't know what they teach you in the UK, but its not the only country or people that has played a role in the history and formation of these 4 (particularly Canada & the US).
Chauvinism? Since when is referring to something as "Anglo-Saxon" chauvinistic? It reflects no national pride to state that your culture, laws and what not have been greatly influenced by Anglo-Saxon values. It isn't just my blind assertion that this is the case either, academics can draw far more parallels between your culture (both in the US and Canada) and the British culture than they can between your cultures and other European or indigenous cultures. I see little of First Nation or American Indian culture present in the fundamentals of your society.

If you also understood NZ and Australian history you'd know that there were indigenous people present here too. In NZ, the Maoris have had a profound influence on society here, however, that doesn't mean that our society isn't also founded on Anglo-Saxon values primarily evident in laws, the Parliamentary system and what not. To deny this is utter tripe.

Anyway, if you want to continue this discussion, PM me and I'm more than happy to discuss this with you, however, we're currently polluting this thread and dragging it off-topic so we should take this elsewhere. :)
 
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