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· Mơמkƹ͛ƴ∆ґ&#4
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I don't see what the big deal is. "Urban life" is for everyone living within that urban area, kids included. Them being excluded is either a problem on the part of the parents (over-protectionism) or a problem with the surrounding environment (unsafe). Which unfortunately, is largely the case in much of the world. I'm certainly quite thankful my parents gave me enough independence as a child and could go to school myself, and explore the neighbourhood and even the city from a relatively young age, and was sent on errands, etc.


The Anglo-Saxon world...UK, USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand
Only one of these countries could be described as "Anglo-Saxon" (UK). It is an ethnic group, not a language.
 

· Mơמkƹ͛ƴ∆ґ&#4
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5,785 Posts
Obviously you didn't read what was said in that quote properly. Are you just so desperate to attempt to prove someone wrong that you have lost the ability to read? Rightly or wrongly, Anglo-Saxon can be used to refer to the USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.
Sure, it can be used incorrectly to describe them, just as this can incorrectly be described as pink:



Doesn't actually make it the case.
 

· Mơמkƹ͛ƴ∆ґ&#4
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5,785 Posts
Also, my personal experience is the opposite. My parents allowed me to walk outside by myself in both big-city Toronto and Brisbane with no problems. Many of my friends can attest to the same...
This is generally true for us inner-city kids throughout the "Anglosphere", however, the problem is that we're simply outnumbered by suburbanites to such a large extent. Thus leading me to believe the overbearing parent is largely a learned behavior brought about primarily through urban design, rather than a cultural trait of English-speaking countries.


As for your comment about Canada being an "Anglo-Saxon" nation, I doubt many Brits in the street would consider the UK "Anglo-Saxon" given the ethnic diversity present in the UK these days, but that doesn't mean it doesn't have Anglo-Saxon roots that have strongly influenced the culture, laws, literature and history of that country. But I digress.
Its not merely a question of ethnic diversity (and even if it were, Anglo-Saxons constitute the majority of the UK's population, which is not the case in the other 4 countries), but that in the case of Canada at least, it has much more than "Anglo-Saxon roots" - it was neither initially settled nor colonized by Britain, merely taken possession of at a later time by them. Which of course has influenced its laws, culture, etc. but again, we could say the same of India, which I certainly wouldn't call an Anglo-Saxon nation.


I only continued this line of discussion because of your fellow Canadian making such a song and dance about the use of a term which, in my mind (as well as others) was perfectly acceptable to use in a bid to score "one-up" on me.
No, its not about you, actually, but rather an inaccurate (and quite chauvinistic and patriarchal) description of 4 countries. Don't know what they teach you in the UK, but its not the only country or people that has played a role in the history and formation of these 4 (particularly Canada & the US).
 
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