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Discussion Starter #1
What are some cities/neighborhoods that are so decayed that they're actually reverting back to the way they were before urbanization?

- Cairo, Illinois
- Parts of Detroit
- Parts of St. Louis

Not trying to single out the midwest with my list at all, it's just that the top 3 examples I can think of happen to be there.
 

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While you can argue 3,000 ppsm is "rural", that would mean that many suburbs and even urban neighborhoods in many cities are "rural". BTW, the very definition of "ghetto" implies the opposite of "rural". A "rural ghetto" is an oxymoron...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
^^
While you can argue 3,000 ppsm is "rural", that would mean that many suburbs and even urban neighborhoods in many cities are "rural". BTW, the very definition of "ghetto" implies the opposite of "rural". A "rural ghetto" is an oxymoron...
There are definetly rural ghettos and there can be rural neighborhoods in cities.
 

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Dude, it's called an "Urban Prairie" and planners all over the country are grappling with their implications. Communities have experimented with urban farming, returning the land to nature entirely, and landbanking and de-mapping utilities and infrastructure to "shrink to greatness".
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Dude, it's called an "Urban Prairie" and planners all over the country are grappling with their implications. Communities have experimented with urban farming, returning the land to nature entirely, and landbanking and de-mapping utilities and infrastructure to "shrink to greatness".
This is exactly what I was talking about, thank you.
 

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"Parts of St Louis"? Exactly what parts are you referring to? The fields and woods of Forest Park? The community gardens? I am puzzled by your statement because I know of absolutely NO rural area in St Louis. I live here, and I guarantee it's 100% urban.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
"Parts of St Louis"? Exactly what parts are you referring to? The fields and woods of Forest Park? The community gardens? I am puzzled by your statement because I know of absolutely NO rural area in St Louis. I live here, and I guarantee it's 100% urban.
St. Louis has no urban praries or areas that are so decayed that vegetation is taking over?
 

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The Jive is Alive.
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St. Louis has no urban praries or areas that are so decayed that vegetation is taking over?
Maybe only in small pockets, but by no means is the vacant land in Saint Louis nearly as widespread as say, in Detroit. The City of Saint Louis is highly urbanized, even in areas that have suffered decline. Sure, there are some neighborhoods with a lot of vacant lots, but they are peppered into the otherwise built-up landscape. Urban prairies exist in East St. Louis and some inner-ring suburbs moreso than in the City.
 

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Even in Detroit, the emptiest neighborhoods have densities in the 3,000-5,000 ppsm range. While they were originally built for much higher densities, the fact remains that they aren't as prairie-like as some imagine.
 

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It depends on how large or small of an area you are referring to. You can find a few blocks here and there with a population density of zero, but the more blocks you add on to those, the denser the area becomes. Once you start talking about square miles, the emptiest residential areas of Detroit have densities in the 3,000-5,000 ppsm range. The only exception is neighborhoods that the city has been clearing and rezoning for industry.
 

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To give you an example, Poletown is often noted as being ground zero for Detroit's "urban prairies". The neighborhood is basically bounded by I-94 to the north, Mount Elliott to the east, Gratiot to the south, and the railroad tracks to the west. As of 2000, the total area of the neighborhood was 1.56 sq. mi. while the population was 6,966. The population density was 4,463.0 people per square mile.

Here's a map:


To the south of that is the McDougall-Hunt neighborhood, home to Detroit's "famous" Heidelberg Project. In 2000, the neighborhood had a population of 1,832 in 0.38 sq. mi. for a density of 4,839.7 people per square mile. Again, these are the neighborhoods that people site when talking about Detroit's urban prairies. To the east is a neighborhood I'll call Kettering, though I don't know if it has an official name. Kettering (bounded by I-94 to the north, Van Dyke to the east, Gratiot to the south, and Mt. Elliott to the west) is home to Detroit's most famous industrial ruin, the nearly 3/4 mile long Packard Plant. The population of the neighborhood was 2,661 in an area of 0.77 sq. mi. While the density is only 3,443.9 ppsm, that is largely due to the fact that about 1/3 of the neighborhood is taken up by the Packard Plant as well as a large cemetary and high school.
 

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Northwest Photo King
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It's not that hard to figure out guys. All he is saying is can you think of more towns and cities that are beginning, or have decayed, and now have grass and nature consuming them. Vacant lots, untended homes and buildings now sprouting with weeds, etc.

Sheesh, you make it so complcated. ;)

Newark has some, so does Buffalo, Chicago, even parts of Jacksonville. . . . even New York.

You can see a lot, and learn a lot about this topic from this site.

http://www.jamesgriffioen.net/index.php?/prairies/lost-neighborhoods/
 

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^^Wow...those photos are both captivating and beautiful. Some of those abandoned streets make it seem as if humanity has disappeared from the earth completely.
 

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My guess is that the vast majority of those images were taken in the old St. Cyril's neighborhood. It was actively cleared out by the city of Detroit and rezoned for industry. While much of the land is still empty, it has seen a decent amount of industrial development. The ironic thing about those pictures is that they could only take them at certain angles or else they'd see large new factories in the background...




Here's the overhead view. You can see where the newer factories have replaced the old residential streets:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
My guess is that the vast majority of those images were taken in the old St. Cyril's neighborhood. It was actively cleared out by the city of Detroit and rezoned for industry. While much of the land is still empty, it has seen a decent amount of industrial development. The ironic thing about those pictures is that they could only take them at certain angles or else they'd see large new factories in the background...




Here's the overhead view. You can see where the newer factories have replaced the old residential streets:
Thank you for the pictures, I wasn't trying to insult Detroit, or any of these cities for that matter, by the way.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Are there any areas in the south like that? Obviously industry wasn't as a major industry unlike the north and midwest but I'd still think that there are some areas that were once industrial that are now decaying.

Parts of Jacksonville were mentioned.
 
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