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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There are relatively few US cities which are not located on a river, ocean, bay, inlet, large or mid-size lake, or other body of water. (Excluded from this observation are ponds, small lakes, streams, ditches and canals.)
Among the top 100 US cities, I've identified the following dozen "dry land" cities:
Atlanta, Charlotte, Las Vegas, Henderson, Birmingham, Fresno, Tucson, Plano, Chandler, Lexington, Greensboro, and Durham.
Are there others?
 

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Those cities also tend to suffer less from traffic congestion.

Cities like New York or Los Angeles have nearly no beltways around the city, and many bridges which are major bottlenecks (especially in NY where they are tolled too).

How about Indianapolis and Columbus?
 

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Those cities also tend to suffer less from traffic congestion.

Cities like New York or Los Angeles have nearly no beltways around the city, and many bridges which are major bottlenecks (especially in NY where they are tolled too).

How about Indianapolis and Columbus?
rivers; I know Indy's is not navitagable but I'm not sure about Columbus.

Atlanta has a river, but it is at the outskirts. I'd have to include Houston, Dallas, and Denver among the major cities that have smaller rivers (be they called that or bayou or creek) that abut their downtowns, but whose width doesn't allow for any shipping need. San Antonio, for all the River Walk fame, seems to belong in that category, too.
 

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Las Vegas is tougher than it might seem. Obviously, Hoover Dam didn't exist in 1906 when it was founded. So Las Vegas got it's water from a local spring. The spring was a little distance away from the original town site, but the land surrounding the town site was fertile and used to grow crops; Las Vegas was a farming community before it was officially set up by the railroads.

It fits into this thread inasmuch that the spring was not right next to the town. But what if irrigation brought the water to the site before the town was there?
 

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If you count Tucson as not being on a body of water, then you should count Phoenix as well. Both are built on rivers that now flow only when it rains: the Salt River in Phoenix and the Santa Cruz River in Tucson. Both rivers flowed year-round at the time of each city's founding, and indeed are the reason each city exists. But both rivers lost their year-round flow to diversion of the water for agriculture and excessive groundwater pumping.
 

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rivers; I know Indy's is not navitagable but I'm not sure about Columbus.

Columbus has nothing navigable. It's not built on water by any means, just like Indy. Almost all cities will have a couple creeks, ditches, and things they call "rivers". They still aren't really built on water, because they lack a real river (meaning navigable), Great Lake, ocean, bay, etc.

Everything besides the coastal cities (East, West, Great Lakes, Gulf), major river cities (Mississippi, Ohio, etc., etc.), and major bay cities are not built on water. That certainly would include Columbus, Dayton, and Akron in Ohio. Ohio only has three major cities with navigable water- Toledo, Cleveland, Cincinnati. The rest are not built on water in the sense that water is a tool of trade and significant natural resource.
 

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uh...plano? chandler? what's a plano? is it a city?
 

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thanks. I googled ...

I was only trying to figure out why someone would put suburbs into a list of cities
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Maybe because some suburbs (like Mesa) are larger than well known cities like Miami or St Louis. (city proper ofcourse).
Exactly. Plano, Arlington, Garland, Mesa, Chandler, Scottsdale, Henderson, Long Beach, Jersey City, etc.... they all rank in the top 100 most populated cities of America, and they're all suburbs of a more populous city.
 

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In Florida, Orlando is the largest city not on a river, bay or ocean.
 

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In Lexington there's no question, our city limits are 8 miles from the Kentucky River at it's closest point.
 
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